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How do these shoes stack up? - Page 3

post #31 of 43
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Now I'm curious. What handwork goes into the Tramezza shoes?? I thought their claims were the normal marketing-speak...
In the Tramezza booklet, right in front of me, there are pictures of a man sewing welt and soles. There are also close-ups of the shoemaker using an awl and of two needles and thread connecting sole to welt. Although I have never closely inspected the Tramezza line (here in the UK Ferragamo is only available in EE and they don't fit me), I have no reason to assume the pictures are fake and do not show the actual process used to produce that range. I believe it's a truly handmade shoe made over a stock last.
post #32 of 43
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What handwork goes into the Tramezza shoes??
All the welting, including a carved feather, and the outsole work.  I used to have a half production sample, like the Vass ones you guys sent me, and the work was extensive.  Look at the insoles, they are very nice.  Basically, one of the upper workshops does the pattern cutting, skiving and stitching.  They then go to another private workshop where the lasting is done.  Finally, they are sent 'up the mountain', so to speak, where another group of people does all the handwork I refer to.  This is sort of standard operating procedure in Italy, and something Ferragamo himself standardized in regards to volume and exportation. The second shoe pictured in this thread is not one of the Tramezza shoes, btw.
For $600+ it better be. ;-) See http://ferragamo.neimanmarcus.com/store....&cmCat= JV
post #33 of 43
Oh well, got most of it right. I am curious though; usually for all the handwork and size of insole, a much thicker outsole is used. That is what I was looking at. As I said, I stopped carrying Ferragamo a few years ago, and don't really keep up with the line in total. Anyway, Bengal-Stripe, is the sole in the brochure much heavier than the pictured shoe?
post #34 of 43
brown suede captoe bal, 8.5D --$339 http://cgi.ebay.com/ws....13&rd=1
post #35 of 43
Very interesting. I'm amazed really, as at $600 they are quite a deal if hand welted. That would make them comparable to Santoni handmades for instance, at $1100+. Still a ways from a Vass shoe which is handmade from start to finish, but very impressive nonetheless. The Ferragamo guys need to get their story straight though. I went into the SF Ferragamo store to ask after their "new" handmade shoes, after reading a blurb about them in a magazine. The salesman, who seemed very knowledgeable, said that the reference must be to their new custom order program as they had not carried any truly handmade shoes for over two years. He described the last model they had (sort of a Norwegian) which I happen to own (it's one of my favorite shoes in fact.) If they are currently selling handmade shoes for $600, then they need to tell their employees about it, it's a selling point.. And you'll have to forgove my skepticism - I am so used to Italian companies touting their "handmade" shoes, even displaying obviously fake pictures on their websites, when their shoes are certainly not handmade, that I hardly expected Ferragamo to be the exception.
post #36 of 43
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they had not carried any truly handmade shoes for over two years
Well, my experience here goes back more than two years, so maybe something has changed? I am still curious about the second picture, as the details don't add up, to me anyway.
post #37 of 43
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 I'd probably not even attempt to ask around Indy.
John: As an Indiana native I can assure you that for must Hoosiers, proper attire is an Indiana Basketball T-shirt, goofy shorts & tennis shoes. And that's the outfit you wear to take the family to Olive Garden. Hence, I wouldn't even waste my time looking for such a shop there.
post #38 of 43
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All the welting, including a carved feather, and the outsole work. I used to have a half production sample, like the Vass ones you guys sent me, and the work was extensive.
I've seen the half sample that you're talking about, and it looked to me that it had a cut-and-turned feather a la JM Weston rather than a carved feather a la Vass. I could certainly be mistaken, but I am sure that the feather was an integral part of the insole and not glued on.
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I am curious though; usually for all the handwork and size of insole, a much thicker outsole is used.
Most of the Tramezza shoes that I've seen lately have had relatively thin outsoles -- maybe 1/4 " or 3/8". I don't know what that implies, but there it is.
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And you'll have to forgove my skepticism - I am so used to Italian companies touting their "handmade" shoes, even displaying obviously fake pictures on their websites, when their shoes are certainly not handmade, that I hardly expected Ferragamo to be the exception.
I'm skeptical, too, both for the reason that you mention and because I've never known Ferragamo to undercharge for their products. I could see a Gravati or a Martegani hand-welted shoe for $600 (I'm not saying that they make them, just speculating on price if they did), but not a Ferragamo.
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The salesman, who seemed very knowledgeable, said that the reference must be to their new custom order program as they had not carried any truly handmade shoes for over two years.
I went to Neiman Marcus a couple of months ago to hear the spiel about the custom order program, and the two real selling points were fit (they had a full range of widths, and they were willing to make adjustments to the lasts to fit your feet) and leather selection (they had a very nice selection of perhaps 40 different leathers and suedes). The Ferragamo guy left me with the impression that the construction was equivalent to the stock Tramezzas, which is why I was distinctly unimpressed with the price (they started at around $850, if I remember correctly). Of course, it could be that I just assumed that the construction was the same as with stock Tramezzas and the salesman just never said anything to disabuse me of my preconceived notions.
post #39 of 43
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That would make them comparable to Santoni handmades for instance, at $1100+.
What is the difference between the Santoni handmades and the Santoni Fatte a Mano shoes? Where do you buy Santoni handmades, l have never seen them on their website.
post #40 of 43
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What do folks think about the Bally Scribe collection (www.bally.com)?  I really like the styling of the "Alban," but they're also $600+.  Seem quite well made according to the description on the website.
I have a couple. For most years the most part the scribe have been "clunky". I bought two pairs of really nicely chiseled toes ones but had to sell them on ebay as they were not the same size as the clunkier scribes. They are amazingly well made. I have a pair of bright red wingtips that always get compliments. -
post #41 of 43
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(johnapril @ Jan. 20 2005,11:24)  I'd probably not even attempt to ask around Indy.
John: As an Indiana native I can assure you that for must Hoosiers, proper attire is an Indiana Basketball T-shirt, goofy shorts & tennis shoes. And that's the outfit you wear to take the family to Olive Garden. Hence, I wouldn't even waste my time looking for such a shop there.
With all due respect, I wouldn't be caught dead in in the clothes you describe, not even to mow my lawn. I might, however, be found dead were I ever to eat something at the Olive Garden.
post #42 of 43
[quote] [quote] (johnapril @ Jan. 24 2005,08:43)
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Originally Posted by Stu,Jan. 22 2005,06:30
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Originally Posted by johnapril,Jan. 20 2005,11:24
 I'd probably not even attempt to ask around Indy.
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...proper attire is an Indiana Basketball T-shirt...
With all due respect, I wouldn't be caught dead in in the clothes you describe, not even to mow my lawn....
Well, no one of good taste would be found in an Indiana basketball t-shirt... Go 'Cats.
post #43 of 43
[quote]
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Quote (johnapril @ Jan. 24 2005,08:43)
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Originally Posted by Stu,Jan. 22 2005,06:30
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Originally Posted by johnapril,Jan. 20 2005,11:24
 I'd probably not even attempt to ask around Indy.
Quote:
...proper attire is an Indiana Basketball T-shirt...
With all due respect, I wouldn't be caught dead in in the clothes you describe, not even to mow my lawn....
Well, no one of good taste would be found in an Indiana basketball t-shirt... Go 'Cats.
Absolutely agreed.
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