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Alden shoes for men in their 20s?

post #1 of 49
Thread Starter 
What is the general consensus on fairly young people wearing Alden shoes? Do Alden shoes on the feet of a guy in his 20s seem out of place? What about the classic Alden Tassel loafer?
post #2 of 49
No to the first, yes to the second (I just don't like tassled loafers period, though).
post #3 of 49
I prefer something with a little more modern look, but there's certainly nothing wrong with a guy in his twenties wearing Alden. I definitely agree with johnny about the second point though - I don't like tasseled loafers on anybody but on younger guys they are especially jarring.
post #4 of 49
I have actually been thinking about this same question. What I decided was it depends on the shoe. A more conservative style will be conservative whether its Alden, Allen Edmonds or some European brand. If you want a more stylish shoe then you might need to look at the brands. For me, I'm more conservative so I guess it comes to comfort. But, style is personal and you need to decide on a shoe style not a brand.
post #5 of 49
Good, classic fashion is not limited to any age bracket. I wish everyone in his 20s wore Alden and its ilk.
post #6 of 49
Quote:
What is the general consensus on fairly young people wearing Alden shoes? Do Alden shoes on the feet of a guy in his 20s seem out of place? What about the classic Alden Tassel loafer?
I fit the demographic you're describing and see nothing wrong with a younger gentleman wearing Alden shoes. All of their designs are very conservative, timeless pieces that will never look dated or completely out of style. That being said, the tassel loafers are a definite no go for most twenty-somethings.
post #7 of 49
Quote:
What is the general consensus on fairly young people wearing Alden shoes? Do Alden shoes on the feet of a guy in his 20s seem out of place? What about the classic Alden Tassel loafer?
The Alden Fan shoes would look fine on the 20-something set - especially the chukkas or the square toed blucher. A generic cap-toe or plain-toe looks acceptable on everybody.  I think the bulky double sole blucher plaintoe would be a good shoe for the younger set in burgundy or black.   Tassel loafers, on the other hand, don't look too good on the 20-something set.  I think high vamp plain loafer would be better. On the other hand, I wore a tassled wing-tip loafer (by Dexter) throughout college as my black "dress" shoe.  this was back when i had 5 shoes - and 3 of them were sports shoes or sneakers. (My brown dress shoe was a timberland boat shoe - a dress shoe only in my mind.)
post #8 of 49
I recommend the split toe Norwegians.  I was in on Saturday to be fitted for Aldens (first time) and had thought I would purchase a cap toe or medallion toe, but after trying on the Norwegians, I was struck by their pleasing design.  I hadn't really even considered that model before seeing it. That said, I also tried on the tassel loafers, which I had previously considered a shoe for elderly gentlemen.  I was surprised to find that it too is quite a beautiful shoe, which I will definitely pick up if all goes well with my first order.  Either that, or the explanation is that I am getting older myself.  I can see, though, that it really would be suitable for someone with a traditional wardrobe, whereas the oxfords would be more versatile.
post #9 of 49
Keep in mind the traditional Alden penny loafer gained currency as a campus shoe worn by the younger set. Alden classic dress shoes are, well, classic dress shoes, suitable for all ages. I do quite like their Norwegians, and want to get a pair. I particularly admire the Alden Fan Shoe version.
post #10 of 49
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Alden classic dress shoes are, well, classic dress shoes, suitable for all ages.
Some people here might disagree but the classic shoes are basically the same no matter were you get them, from a design. The Allen Edmonds Park Avenue, which I am wearing right now, is no different from thw C&J Whitehall or whatever the equivelant Alden shoe is from an asthetic point of view. Obviously, quality is another story.
post #11 of 49
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Some people here might disagree but the classic shoes are basically the same no matter were you get them, from a design. The Allen Edmonds Park Avenue, which I am wearing right now, is no different from thw C&J Whitehall or whatever the equivelant Alden shoe is from an asthetic point of view. Obviously, quality is another story
As a shoe aficionado, I strongly disagree. Ironically, I find that the characteristics in build quality that separate Aldens or the Allen Edmonds Park Ave. from a Lobb or Green is less bothersome than the difference in aesthetics. For example, let's examine captoe oxfords--a quinessential staple in a man's wardrobe. The first example I recalled was the John Lobb Phillip II from the Classics collections, but I can't find a pictures. So here is a close approximation from an A Harris auction: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws....27&rd=1 Note the bootmaker sole and toe shape among other details. Now compare the previous shoe with a similar model from Alden: http://www.aldenshoe.com/cat_ane2_c906.htm I had the opportunity not long ago to buy the black version of this shoe, brand new, for just a tad under $100 + tax. Although the Aldens were really comfortable, I'd rather pay a tad more for an English shoe that's leagues ahead of the Alden in terms of aesthetics.
post #12 of 49
Quote:
Keep in mind the traditional Alden penny loafer gained currency as a campus shoe worn by the younger set.
Note that nobody talks about "the younger set" these days. Certainly, tassled loafers are still accpetable for those who wore them and were in fact part of "the younger set" when "the younger set" was described as such - examples include George Bush Sr., Gore Vidal, older Congressmen.
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Alden classic dress shoes are, well, classic dress shoes, suitable for all ages.
I would qualify this as suitable for staid men of all ages. Alden shoes, while undoubtedly well made, are never, have never been, stylish.
post #13 of 49
Phoey, the monkstrap and chukka boot aren't necessarily staid. Not as cool as a pair of Ludwig Reiter trainers or Berluti wholecuts, but they can still look cool with jeans and a distressed cord blazer.
post #14 of 49
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Not as cool as a pair of Ludwig Reiter trainers or Berluti wholecuts, but they can still look cool with jeans and a distressed cord blazer.
Yeah, okay, I'll give you that. *Some* guys can pull it off. The monkstrap is a tough one though, especially. The Chukka is much easier.
post #15 of 49
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Alden shoes, while undoubtedly well made, are never, have never been, stylish.
Tassel shoes were stylish as part of the full Brooks Brothers natural shoulder "uniform" of the '50s and '60s for college-aged men. Almost universal in some circles (see Ken Pollock's posts on "Ask Andy" and look at Cary Grant's cordovan tassel shoes in "To Catch a Thief"). But I agree that this is history. I don't see these shoes ever worn by men in their 20's and, if it's not worn at all, it's not stylish. Not to offend the entire American Trad wing of these forums, I was sitting at an outdoor restaurant this September on the east side of New York and saw a young man in his '20's walk right by in white bucks, blue seersucker suit, white buttondown shirt, bow tie, and  straw boater hat with grosgrain ribbon. He stood out. My wife asked me if men still wore these clothes. I had to say no (I thought it would have been stylish 40 years ago, before the hippies). P.S. All you guys complain about "American Trad" on "Ask Andy"-but everyone's posting on Alden on this forum too.
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