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Longevity/durability of Loro Piana Storm System

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I've seen several different members highly recommend LP's Storm System fabrics for foul weather overcoats.  Can anyone speak to the durability of this material? Also, is a zip-out liner typical on these types of coats?  The LP SS coats I've seen at Brooks Brothers and Neiman Marcus all had zip-out liners, presumably so the coat could serve in both cool and cold conditions. Thanks, dan
post #2 of 14
I have two Brooks Brothers coats with the LP Storm System. I am very pleased with the material. One of them is the full-length Towncoat and the other is the Car Coat. I have had the Towncoat for about three years and it is still in excellent condition. I am not sure about the liner.
post #3 of 14
I just checked and (as I was quite sure) the liners on these coats do not zip out. I am guessing that there are probably some that do, though.
post #4 of 14
I have a Faconnable and am happy with it. The fabric is soft and woolen, but the water beads on it.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies so far. Has anyone had an LPSS coat in which the waterproofing treatment wore off and had to be reapplied? dan
post #6 of 14
I have different Loro Piana Storm System coats in cashmere, wool/cashmere and wool. All have perfectly through the years retained the water proof and all still look great. According their literature the water/wind hitech barrier is below the nap and is a backing. Also, I've a "Horsey" polyester jacket which is like typical waterproof coats (without the insult of low price). "An exclusive waterproof, windproof and perfectly breathable membrane is applied to the back of the fabric whilst the surface repels water with its special rain system treatment."
post #7 of 14
I've never seen this coat. Are they made of bonded cotton like Macintosh coats? Those are really waterproof, like a duck. Bonded cotton IMO is the best foul weather material.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
I've never seen this coat. Are they made of bonded cotton like Macintosh coats? Those are really waterproof, like a duck. Bonded cotton IMO is the best foul weather material.
The membrane is on the back and not visible. It looks like normal cashmere or wool.
post #9 of 14
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(Mike C. @ Jan. 17 2005,20:06) I've never seen this coat. Are they made of bonded cotton like Macintosh coats?   Those are really waterproof, like a duck. Bonded cotton IMO is the best foul weather material.
The membrane is on the back and not visible.  It looks like normal cashmere or wool.
I bought one of these in black cashmere a few years back. Wore the heck out of it in London... still looks good, though. Highly recommended. JV
post #10 of 14
I've got one in dark brown cashmere (Horsey model) that my wife bought for me 5 years ago as a bday gift -- I wear it constantly this time of year (probably too much), in all weather. Really super coat; still looks brand new. Highly recommended. You won't regret it.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies.  It sounds like it's a worthwhile investment although I still think it looks a little odd to be wearing a cashmere overcoat on a rainy day.   dan
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Thanks for the replies.  It sounds like it's a worthwhile investment although I still think it looks a little odd to be wearing a cashmere overcoat on a rainy day.   dan
How does the cashmere stand up to such brutal weather? I imagine the material is soft and comfortable? How does it fare in cold weather?
post #13 of 14
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(dah328 @ Jan. 18 2005,10:05) Thanks for the replies. It sounds like it's a worthwhile investment although I still think it looks a little odd to be wearing a cashmere overcoat on a rainy day. dan
How does the cashmere stand up to such brutal weather? I imagine the material is soft and comfortable? How does it fare in cold weather?
My storm system coat is not cashmere but wool. I am not bold enough to test it in the rain but it is the only coat I wear when it is snowing. It holds up just fine.
post #14 of 14
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(dah328 @ Jan. 18 2005,10:05) Thanks for the replies.  It sounds like it's a worthwhile investment although I still think it looks a little odd to be wearing a cashmere overcoat on a rainy day.   dan
How does the cashmere stand up to such brutal weather? I imagine the material is soft and comfortable? How does it fare in cold weather?
The cashmere Storm System is pretty much true to its word --water-resistant in even the worst down-pours. Sure, if it's really coming down hard, the material will get a little damp on the outside; still, in my experience, it's never soaked through to the clothes I was wearing underneath. As for its warmth, I think the cashmere SS is -- given it's relative thinness -- surprisingly warm. I tend to run "hot" and therefore prefer the thinner material. It's only on days like today in DC where I grab for one of my thicker cashmere overcoats (today, blue, full-length DB). :-/ JV
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