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Champagne - Page 3

post #31 of 45
Quote:
On Saturday evening I had This menu which consisted of a palet clensing dish of lentils followed by seared Foie Gras, followed by scallops, followed by Venison, followed by Red Mullet, followed by Prune and Amarac soufle, finishing with a cheese board. We began with Martini dry at a nearby bar, followed by a bottle of Dom Perignon 95, and then a Krug Grand Curvee 88, and then Alain Thienot NV, and then Paradis Cognac. What are the views? Perhaps too heavy a meal for just Champagne (Similar style dishes)
By the way, Styleman, you might find it funny to know that, in my teens, I was infatuated with everything British. For the degree called the baccalaureat (taken at age 17/18), one has the possibility, in France, of adding two subjects to gain points. I chose Russian and cooking. For the cooking class, we were to prepare a dossier for the end of the year, choose a thesis of sorts. And of course, I decided to enlighten the French in the arts of British cookery. I constituted a beautiful folder with photos of my creations (when my mother saw me making Scotch eggs, she left the kitchen very quietly). For the practice section of the final exam, taken at a different Lycee in Paris: I was handed a piece of paper, with these simple instructions: make a lemon meringue pie, all the ingredients are in the fridge.
post #32 of 45
British cooking.......... yeah. There's good japanese and indian food in London.
post #33 of 45
Hey, I got five additional points thanks to british cooking. My mother was the most skeptical. My father would eat anything.
post #34 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
(Styleman @ Jan. 17 2005,17:58) On Saturday evening I had This menu which consisted of a palet clensing dish of lentils followed by seared Foie Gras, followed by scallops, followed by Venison, followed by Red Mullet, followed by Prune and Amarac soufle, finishing with a cheese board. We began with Martini dry at a nearby bar, followed by a bottle of Dom Perignon 95, and then a Krug Grand Curvee 88, and then Alain Thienot NV, and then Paradis Cognac. What are the views? Perhaps too heavy a meal for just Champagne (Similar style dishes)
By the way, Styleman, you might find it funny to know that, in my teens, I was infatuated with everything British.  For the degree called the baccalaureat (taken at age 17/18), one has the possibility, in France, of adding two subjects to gain points.  I chose Russian and cooking.  For the cooking class, we were to prepare a dossier for the end of the year, choose a thesis of sorts.  And of course, I decided to enlighten the French in the arts of British cookery.  I constituted a beautiful folder with photos of my creations (when my mother saw me making Scotch eggs, she left the kitchen very quietly).  For the practice section of the final exam, taken at a different Lycee in Paris: I was handed a piece of paper, with these simple instructions: make a lemon meringue pie, all the ingredients are in the fridge.
Scotch eggs, I can see why she left Tradtional British food is really something I would not like to eat, though Modern British is slowly living up to the Frech standards.
post #35 of 45
Not to hijack but I had a quick champagne question... I am in charge of decisions regarding wine and champagne for my wedding reception in a few months. I've thrown myself into learning about wine and don't feel I'll have a problem with the courses and a good wine to pair with. However I'd like to have a couple of bottles of good champagne on hand before we dine (for toasting and the like). Very light fare, if anything, will be consumed along with the champagne so I'm not worried about pairing- I'm concerned only with taste. I have never had (and probably will not until that day) any high end champagne so I'm not sure what to get. I would say we should lean towards something lighter, like Dom or Krug, but would love suggestions on a higher end champagne for this purpose ($150ish being about the limit per bottle, and they need to be relatively easy to acquire).
post #36 of 45
That's easy, go to Costco or Beverages & More and pick up all the 96 Dom you can get, it's $90-95 and 98 point rated champagne, one of the best you can get at any price, it should be good for drinking within 6 months w/ no issues.
post #37 of 45
I'd go with a brut, a dry champagne, especially if you will have tidbits with ham, cheese or seafood as amuse-gueule. I don't know what's available in your area. Perhaps you can find a brut PIPER-HEIDSIECK? That shouldn't be over 50 dollars (it's about 20 euros in France). If it were me, I'd avoid the high concentration of Chardonnay grapes, and lean towards Pinot Noir grapes. That's only my taste. But in the end, who among all your guests will truly appreciate the champagne? Is it worth getting a high end champagne if people can't tell the difference? I remember serving foie gras to a friend here, and he said: "Hmm, tastes just like Braunschweiger". I could have strangled him.
post #38 of 45
Thread Starter 
Personal favorites for drinking by themselves for me are: Dom Perignon 42 Veuve Clicqout Grand Dam NV Krug Grand Cuvee NV But as Fabienne said
Quote:
But in the end, who among all your guests will truly appreciate the champagne? Is it worth getting a high end champagne if people can't tell the difference? I remember serving foie gras to a friend here, and he said: "Hmm, tastes just like Braunschweiger". I could have strangled him.
There really is no point, you are better off going for something like a Moet or Alain Thienot.
post #39 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
(Styleman @ Jan. 17 2005,17:58) On Saturday evening I had This menu which consisted of a palet clensing dish of lentils followed by seared Foie Gras, followed by scallops, followed by Venison, followed by Red Mullet, followed by Prune and Amarac soufle, finishing with a cheese board. We began with Martini dry at a nearby bar, followed by a bottle of Dom Perignon 95, and then a Krug Grand Curvee 88, and then Alain Thienot NV, and then Paradis Cognac. What are the views? Perhaps too heavy a meal for just Champagne (Similar style dishes)
By the way, Styleman, you might find it funny to know that, in my teens, I was infatuated with everything British.  For the degree called the baccalaureat (taken at age 17/18), one has the possibility, in France, of adding two subjects to gain points.  I chose Russian and cooking.  For the cooking class, we were to prepare a dossier for the end of the year, choose a thesis of sorts.  And of course, I decided to enlighten the French in the arts of British cookery.  I constituted a beautiful folder with photos of my creations (when my mother saw me making Scotch eggs, she left the kitchen very quietly).  For the practice section of the final exam, taken at a different Lycee in Paris: I was handed a piece of paper, with these simple instructions: make a lemon meringue pie, all the ingredients are in the fridge.
Did you get any further qualification in cooking?
post #40 of 45
I tend to serve high-end wines, meals, etc. regardless of the recipient's experience with such products because sometimes the recipient may not have much experience with these luxuries but gains interest after exposure. I know this has happened on some cases for me, and I have gotten some good wine/food buddies out of it too.
post #41 of 45
Quote:
I tend to serve high-end wines, meals, etc. regardless of the recipient's experience with such products because sometimes the recipient may not have much experience with these luxuries but gains interest after exposure.  I know this has happened on some cases for me, and I have gotten some good wine/food buddies out of it too.
Yeah, I do tend to spoil my guests as well, and a few have been grateful for the exposure to something other than Budweiser and hot dogs, but if this is a large wedding, I don't know that it is the place to be spending 100 dollars on a bottle of champagne. Unless you have that kind of money to spend. But the meal had better live up to it.
post #42 of 45
Quote:
Did you get any further qualification in cooking?
No degrees, no.  I was a judge in a few cooking contests, but it was only for fun.  I experiment and let my husband taste.  He's not harsh enough, though.  Nobody around is harsh enough.  I want someone to tell me there isn't enough lemon juice, that the shallots were slightly burnt, or that my Mornay sauce is too thick.  It's always the same scenario: I'll be unhappy with most of the courses I will have cooked for a dinner, but not a single person will apparently notice.  Pfff... Edit to add that I am not trying to get compliments. I truly wish I could get honest criticism of my dishes.
post #43 of 45
Well he said he wanted to spend up to $150 and mentioned that it would only be a few bottles. It's not like you get married that often anyways (unless you're Britney Spears )
post #44 of 45
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Well he said he wanted to spend up to $150 and mentioned that it would only be a few bottles.  It's not like you get married that often anyways (unless you're Britney Spears )
True
post #45 of 45
I think that you are driving yourselves nuts for no reason at all.  Over the last 20 years or so I have drunk more champagne than everything else combined.  It is clear to me that champagne is a wine to be drunk (guzzled) at any time, with anything, or nothing.  I have enjoyed champagne with classic french, chinese, pizza, and potato chips and dip.  There are few I have not drunk; some are better than others.  Stop parsing this and grab whatever you like out of the fridge.
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