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My new jantzen shirt...photos. - Page 2

post #16 of 50
Tom:  Don't despair.  It takes a few orders to tweak the Jantzen process.  I think the shirt looks good, but might benefit from a few modifications.   I'm a proponent of collar points being as long as facial structure will permit, so I'd suggest adding just a bit of collar point length. Posted by BGW:
Quote:
Your shirt's shoulders are too broad, it's sleeves too long, and body too wide.
The shouder width, as BGW has noted, is a bit wide and should be reduced; and you might do well to request a slimmer cut.   Sleeve length for a dress shirt which is meant to be worn under a jacket must be sufficiently long for a proper display of linen, as well as to facilitate elevation or extension of the arms without retraction of the cuff into the jacket sleeve.  I would say, then, that the sleeve length is okay: an abundance of sleeve material is the price we must pay; but under the jacket, it's never seen. Were I to order an oxford style shirt intended purely for casual wear without a jacket, I would hasten to shorten the sleeve length for a more fitted and sharper look.
post #17 of 50
I think the sleeve length rule is outdated for the vast majority of the population. Most men wear their shirts without a jacket all the time now. I sense the original poster may be the same way (he was wearing the shirt with jeans). Bottom line: if you wear your shirt without a jacket (or take your jacket off a reasonable amount, a slightly shorter sleeve will probably look best. I would advise that the sleeve should be visible 1/2 to 1/8 inch 90% of the time you are wearing a shirt. I promise your arms will not be bent as far as possible for much of the day.
post #18 of 50
I'm hoping that asking Jantzen for higher armholes and perhaps a smaller sleeve circumference will solve part of the problem -- what's your opinion?
post #19 of 50
Quote:
Bottom line: if you wear your shirt without a jacket (or take your jacket off a reasonable amount, a slightly shorter sleeve will probably look best. I would advise that the sleeve should be visible 1/2 to 1/8 inch 90% of the time you are wearing a shirt. I promise your arms will not be bent as far as possible for much of the day.
Really? Most of the time during the day, I'm seated with my arms bent. When I'm not seated, I'm walking to or from someplace else, with my arms either swinging or grasping a pad and paper. They're very rarely hanging straight down. The sleeves are just fine.
post #20 of 50
The age old solution for dress shirts worn casually: roll up the sleeves.
post #21 of 50
I think the shirt looks great. It's the white exposed undershirt that I think makes your look look tired. Go for a v-neck undershirt so that only your skin shows at the neck, not a cotton whitey.
post #22 of 50
Quote:
I think the shirt looks great. It's the white exposed undershirt that I think makes your look look tired. Go for a v-neck undershirt so that only your skin shows at the neck, not a cotton whitey.
Good call. I noticed as well but couldn't put my finger on it.
post #23 of 50
Nice fabrics (no too long sleeves at all) needs some alteration to be perfect ugly color of jacket or bad camera .... Green? awfull jean's and belt.
post #24 of 50
dots with strips.... a joke?
post #25 of 50
Posted by dug:
Quote:
dots with strips.... a joke?
I think that the combination of small dots with stripes is perfectly acceptable.  The mixing of patterns can be tricky, but the one caveat is to not mix patterns that are too similar and competitive.  Tom's dotted tie and striped shirt look fine together.
post #26 of 50
Quote:
Posted by dug:
Quote:
dots with strips.... a joke?
I think that the combination of small dots with stripes is perfectly acceptable.  The mixing of patterns can be tricky, but the one caveat is to not mix patterns that are too similar and competitive.  Tom's dotted tie and striped shirt look fine together.
you are free to think that stockings on your head will look great but It would not mean you are right... dots and strips do not match together this is obvious. why triying to justify when you can wear a plain tie? how can dot be similar to stips? small dots? these are small for you? what is big then?
post #27 of 50
I propose that we ignore Mr. Dug's comments until he learns to behave like a gentleman. There is no place for this kind of immaturity on this forum.
post #28 of 50
? saying dots do not match with strips is immature? saying "we should ignore" must be a great exemple of maturity... do you think seriously that talking about pics of a shirt on a forum is very mature? I do not think but I do not car beeing immature.
post #29 of 50
The polka dots work nicely with the striped shirt. There is certainly no prohibition against playing different patterns off each other. In this case, it works. However, even assuming it does not work, the value of criticism is not enhanced when the message is communicated in a way that offers nothing constructive and that serves to belittle. It is not the fact that is being communicated that others find objectionable, but the manner in which it is being communicated. Saying that something is "ugly" or a "joke" fails to inform the listener/reader of WHY you believe the choice of colors/patterns/fabrics is in error and constitutes bad manners. A gentleman insure that all persons leave a social interaction feeling good whenever possible and expresses regret, as I will now, when that is not possible. Moreover, here the wearer wanted the viewer to focus on the shirt. The jeans and jacket were merely to place the shirt in a context, not to comprise a particular fashion statement.
post #30 of 50
Dug:  You obviously have a personal dislike for the combination of stripes and dots, and I believe that I speak for many when I assure you that your opinions are both welcome and respected here; however, the method by which you've demonstrated disagreement with the opinions of others leaves much to be desired. There are many schools of style, one not necessarily superior to another.  I'd be interested to know what you think are the most appealing styles, and what you find not to your liking, and why. I may not agree with all that you say, but you can be assured that I won't resort to personal attack because I disagree with you.  Please extend that courtesy to the rest of us. Here are a couple of photos showing a combination of stripes and dots that I feel look terrific.  Jack Buchanan and Robert Gieve were just two who subscribed to the idea that multiple patterns could be tastefully and stylishly paired.
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