or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Hercule Poirot Series.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hercule Poirot Series.

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
I note the exceptional costumes for the Hercule Poirot series with David Suchet.

Not only is everything period-correct, but all the items fit the individuals extremely well. The accessories are also top-notch--walking sticks, Goyard and alligator luggage, etc.

post #2 of 33
Thats one of the things I love about Poirot. He is very particular about his appearance.

A great show.

K
post #3 of 33
Good observation, LK. I love that show and have been thinking about buying the complete boxed set of DVDs. It's amazing how the production company has been able to create the art deco design feel of the 30s. David Suchet is, of course, a very fine actor and really looks the way we'd imagine Poirot from the books, and Hugh Fraser nails Capt. Hastings.
post #4 of 33
Poirot and Hastings are always very well turned out. I especially love all the period buildings. I wish it were still on so I guess I'll have to order the set also.
post #5 of 33
I love Poirot. Great show, really good cast and a great set that genuinely gave you the feel for the time in which it was set. They have made television series out of PG Wodehouse and Agatha Christie's works. Now if only someone made a (good) show out of Enid Blyton's books, my childhood dreams would be complete. =)
post #6 of 33
Thread Starter 
They now have a new Miss Marple, which I feel is slightly camp. Perhaps it's the high definition coloration, but everything feels slightly artificial.
post #7 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
They now have a new Miss Marple, which I feel is slightly camp. Perhaps it's the high definition coloration, but everything feels slightly artificial.

Agreed on all counts. The Suchet Poirots are amazing, as are Jeeves and Wooster.
post #8 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
I note the exceptional costumes for the Hercule Poirot series with David Suchet.

You have much more a Fedora Lounge leaning than you'd like to think.
post #9 of 33
and the women dress nice too.

Of course, all the men have nice fit, but I like the attention to detail in the way women dressed back in the older days.
post #10 of 33
I really love this show. As the others mentioned, the costumes are great and the rest of the production values are very high. I like the machinery too. They had Captain Hastings in a Bugatti Type 34 in one episode and in another there was a swell flying boat I had never seen before. I have never read the stories but I have always wondered about how Poirot is portrayed as being somewhat reticent with regards to physical risk. He was a police officer in Belgium before the Great War -- he had to have been on the street and cracked some heads sometime...
post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post

It is not without problems. Notice how Poirot wears his boutonnière vase holder on the outside of the lapel of a humble lounge coat. The more ostentatious display outside would have been better with a morning coat, but not with a garment that was considered rather casual in its time.
post #12 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
It is not without problems. Notice how Poirot wears his boutonnière vase holder on the outside of the lapel of a humble lounge coat. The more ostentatious display outside would have been better with a morning coat, but not with a garment that was considered rather casual in its time.
Do you think it could have been reflective of his dandyism? Certainly, his predilection for patent button boots is also somewhat idiosyncratic.
post #13 of 33
Period texts mention that better dressers tried to raise their game up above the average dresser in lounge suits by wearing morning coats. I don't necessarily mean a black SB one or two button model, but also more informal three button models with notched lapels made of worsted in lighter colours, pinstripes or even window pane checks:





Patent leather button boots would have only worked if Poirot tended to go around in morning full dress and top hat.

If they had consulted me about period appropriate dandified dress however, I would have probably blown their wardrobe budget with one or two bespoke Savile Row garments! I suspect the dress chosen for Poirot was limited by their bottom line.
post #14 of 33
Thread Starter 
Would such garments have been worn frequently in the Deco period?

It seems rather old-fashioned even for that time.
post #15 of 33
1915 to 20's - yes. 1930's less so.

Notice here how even Churchill is wearing an old fashioned coat with a single button closure of the top button:



Here is another example from 1916:



Nr 728

Not as much changed between the 1910-20s as you would think. Why would you throw out an expensive bespoke garment so soon just to keep up with fashion after all?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Hercule Poirot Series.