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Steamers are worth their weight in gold - Page 2

post #16 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Harris View Post
To the OP - I agree, with a caveat. Some fabrics do NOT react well to steam. They shrivel up to a degree that is hard to restore by pressing. So use with care.
I will keep this in mind. So far I have been lucky and nothing has been damaged. And no, no LV steamer here. I really need to change my name. LOL.
post #17 of 31
I really tend to use my steamer only when I get a new garment from W.W. Chan. For the rest, I just let the jacket or suit (on the rare occasions when I wear a suit) hang in my bathroom for a day so the steam from my shower can affect it.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from Plano View Post
Here's a quiz: What are these threads about?

Men's Clothing: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Social Life, Food and Drink: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Body Consciousness: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Dumb Threads: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Anne Hathaway.
post #19 of 31
Please please please do not steam a suit!

Wool is a hair like the stuff on top of your head; when a suit has been finished, about an hour is spent pressing it, molding that hair into a shape, much like when a woman puts her hair in curlers. Pressing is an art form in itself which, when badly done, can destroy a suit. Likewise, steam in the hands of the inexperienced can ruin the careful shaping that the pressing has given it. Think of how women squeal about their hair when it is humid or rainy out; that's what steaming is going to do to your suit.

I hesitate to even suggest you take your suit to the cleaners for a pressing as most of them will do a poor job as well; find a reputable tailor and ask him who does his pressing, as the chances are very good that he sends his work out to be done on specialized equipment. Failing that, find the best cleaners in town and have them give it a pressing. A good suit will recover between wearings, and little creases in the elbow, knee and back can be gently removed with an iron and a little steam (use a rolled up towel in the sleeve).

Your suit will love you for it.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from Plano View Post
Here's a quiz: What are these threads about?

Men's Clothing: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Social Life, Food and Drink: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Body Consciousness: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Dumb Threads: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

And we were still able to take it in a whole other direction with steamer trunks. Sometimes our tangents are good!
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from Plano View Post
Here's a quiz: What are these threads about?

Men's Clothing: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Social Life, Food and Drink: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Body Consciousness: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

Dumb Threads: Steamers are worth their weight in gold.

That one is especially disturbing.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
Please please please do not steam a suit!

Wool is a hair like the stuff on top of your head; when a suit has been finished, about an hour is spent pressing it, molding that hair into a shape, much like when a woman puts her hair in curlers. Pressing is an art form in itself which, when badly done, can destroy a suit. Likewise, steam in the hands of the inexperienced can ruin the careful shaping that the pressing has given it. Think of how women squeal about their hair when it is humid or rainy out; that's what steaming is going to do to your suit.

I hesitate to even suggest you take your suit to the cleaners for a pressing as most of them will do a poor job as well; find a reputable tailor and ask him who does his pressing, as the chances are very good that he sends his work out to be done on specialized equipment. Failing that, find the best cleaners in town and have them give it a pressing. A good suit will recover between wearings, and little creases in the elbow, knee and back can be gently removed with an iron and a little steam (use a rolled up towel in the sleeve).

Your suit will love you for it.

no
post #23 of 31
Puffy man says "hello" to this thread:




- B
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Puffy man says "hello" to this thread:




- B

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
Please please please do not steam a suit!

Wool is a hair like the stuff on top of your head; when a suit has been finished, about an hour is spent pressing it, molding that hair into a shape, much like when a woman puts her hair in curlers. Pressing is an art form in itself which, when badly done, can destroy a suit. Likewise, steam in the hands of the inexperienced can ruin the careful shaping that the pressing has given it. Think of how women squeal about their hair when it is humid or rainy out; that's what steaming is going to do to your suit.

I hesitate to even suggest you take your suit to the cleaners for a pressing as most of them will do a poor job as well; find a reputable tailor and ask him who does his pressing, as the chances are very good that he sends his work out to be done on specialized equipment. Failing that, find the best cleaners in town and have them give it a pressing. A good suit will recover between wearings, and little creases in the elbow, knee and back can be gently removed with an iron and a little steam (use a rolled up towel in the sleeve).

Your suit will love you for it.

I don't think anyone is recommending steaming lapels, but for backs and pants??? come on...
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceaton View Post
I don't think anyone is recommending steaming lapels
I do. I steam the lapels of my suits and coats to give them back their roll after travel or if they've been compressed flat in my (narrow) closet. Works like a charm
post #27 of 31
what kind of steamer do you have?
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceaton View Post
I don't think anyone is recommending steaming lapels, but for backs and pants??? come on...

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=77413
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!




- B
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post



- B

You have no power here- begone before somebody drops her house on you!
-Glinda
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