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Getting a Close Shave - Page 2

post #16 of 27
I just started using the turbo, very nice
post #17 of 27
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All the previous tips are good. However, I would bin the shave gel - awful stuff. I use Geo F Trumper products, which I find exceptionally good; similar to Taylor's but I think they have the edge (pun intended.). I used to have terrible trouble shaving, and always ended up with sore skin and cuts. Now I use a badger brush, Trumper's skin food, Trumper's shaving soap (or cream, if travelling), and a Mach 3 razor - I find the Turbo version dreadful, but it's a matter of experimenting. The best recommendation I can give is that for almost 4 months I shaved daily in cold water, outdoors, whilst on a military 'adventure' in the desert. Trumpers shaving cream proved equal to the task. It made a real difference. It is also economic - 1 tub of shaving soap lasts many months, and is cheaper than gel in the long run. Trumpers They ship internationally.
Viro Bono, Do you use the skin food before or after shaving - I've heard of many people who use it in the place of a pre-shave oil. I'm a Trumper's user myself - their Violet cream in particular - but have never used their skin food.
post #18 of 27
I use the skin food before shaving. My favourite is West Indian Limes. We all agree that badger brushes are the best; how many store them properly - upside down? I have a Penhaligons razor and brush stand, which looks nice as well as keeping the brush inverted.
post #19 of 27
I agree with the brush users. I've been a fan for years. And yes, it is vital to the longevity of yorbrush to hang it upside down. The travel brush comes with its own canister handle in which it is stored whenpacked away. It can be perched on top of the handle/case to dry. On to the shaving routine. I have the worst of all possible skin/beard combinationsas far as I'm concerned: sensitive fair skin and a heavy beard. Think three o'clock shadow... But the following works for me for the most part. Shave after a shower whenever possible. Otherwise the hot washcloth on the face for five minutes routine is necessary. Leave the water on your beard or splash on some extra. Use pre-shave oil. I use The Art of Shaving Lavender (www.artofshaving.com) and have used King of Shaves (cheaper and just fine.) I found KOS oil at the drug store. I've also used olive oil, canola oil and vegetable oil. All work fine. Several years ago, the head barber at Trumpers in London told me to "use the tube" when I enquired about soap to replace my cup and cake combo for trips. He then told me to look for products containing lots of moisturizing ingredients-- whether cake or tube. Caswell & Massey, Art of Shaving, Kiehls, and of course, Trumpers all fit the bill. The purpose of the oil and the lather is to trap water against your beard and moisturize the skin so that your razor glides smoothly.Lather up, using your fingers or a brush, and shave with the grain. Splash with water again and relather and repeat across the grain if necessary. I am a blade shaver. I use the Mach III Power and find it superior to anything else on the market. My father-in-law just gave me a couple of those old nickle-plated safety razors thattake the double-edged razor blades. This is a much cheaper alternative and I like the feel of the very heavy razor and adjustability of the blade (1-9)for very close shaves. In both cases, DON'T press. Let the design of the blade do the work. Anda word of caution about the double-edge safety razor... that was the generation that won the War boys.... yikes, it can tear you up. Anyone who can shave using a setting above 3 is practicing for a straight razor. Use a styptic pencil/alum block/direct pressure as necessary to control bleeding. Spray 'n Wash gets blood out of collars. Moisturize with an afteshave balm. Again, avoid anyting with alcohol as the primary ingredient. It will dry you out instead of moisturize. And it stings. In winter, you can use heavier lotions. I use Art of Shaving Lavender, but any of the brands mentioned will have good stuff. Use unscented if you have even more senstive skin. Finally, do your face a favor and skip a day every once and a while. On that day exfoliate with a scrub of some sort. It'll help with potential ingrown hairs. Yes, this takes longer than 5 minutes. But I can spend 45 minutes picking out my clothes for the day, too. I shave almost every day and figure I might as well enjoy the experience as much as possible. Think I'll look into that skin food... Good luck, ROT
post #20 of 27
ROT's useful post has reminded me that Trumper's (and Taylor's of Bond Street), offer shaving lessons. A friend of mine who found shaving such a painful experience that he grew a beard, went for a lesson (after he was obliged to shave - he's a naval officer and in the Gulf the possibility of NBC attack required him to be clean-shaven). He found the lesson most effective, and now has no qualms about shaving. Whilst I use a Mach 3 at present, Trumper's advised me to try the old-fashioned blade razor if my skin became sore. i am looking to order one of their travel variety for when my turn in the sandpit comes around. ROT's point about missing a day is good - I try to do this about once a fortnight, and the next shave always seems particularly close. I also use an exfoliating face scrub several times a week, prior to shaving; I use Clinique, but many others are available.
post #21 of 27
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Use a styptic pencil/alum block/direct pressure as necessary to control bleeding. Spray 'n Wash gets blood out of collars.
Another tip: to get blood out of clothing (preferably as soon as you notice it), rub or soak with cold water, never hot (it would set the stain). Or let the soiled garment soak in cold water as long as it takes if it has dried. You may also use soap, always in conjunction with cold water.
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
Incredibly helpful everyone, thanks for sharing the info.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Another tip: to get blood out of clothing (preferably as soon as you notice it), rub or soak with cold water, never hot (it would set the stain). Or let the soiled garment soak in cold water as long as it takes if it has dried. You may also use soap, always in conjunction with cold water.
Fabienne, that is very helpful. Can you elaborate next on how we can best dispose of the body? Do you prefer acid or feeding to pigs?
post #24 of 27
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Another tip: to get blood out of clothing (preferably as soon as you notice it), rub or soak with cold water, never hot (it would set the stain).  Or let the soiled garment soak in cold water as long as it takes if it has dried.  You may also use soap, always in conjunction with cold water.
Fabienne, that is very helpful. Can you elaborate next on how we can best dispose of the body? Do you prefer acid or feeding to pigs?
nonk, reminds me of a surialistic conversation I had a few years ago in a dinner in new york with a friend of a friend who is a "private investigator" and was talking about how he had a good connection with a "discount crematorium" and how he got a good rate because of the business he sent their way.
post #25 of 27
Hmmmm.... disturbing yet riveting. I did forget to add two things. 1) After scraping the beard off, splash with cold water before using the aftershave balm -- to close up the pores. 2) If the blade starts to drag on your face, change the blade. I get about 5 shaves from a fresh razor. Six if I shave only once per session/per day. I'm really interested in this "skin food." Can anyone fill me in? Thanks, ROT
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Hmmmm.... disturbing yet riveting. I did forget to add two things. 1) After scraping the beard off, splash with cold water before using the aftershave balm -- to close up the pores. 2) If the blade starts to drag on your face, change the blade. I get about 5 shaves from a fresh razor. Six if I shave only once per session/per day. I'm really interested in this "skin food." Can anyone fill me in? Thanks, ROT
Here is a link to Trumper's Skin food - many people use it as a pre-shave treatment. My first bottle is in the mail right now.
post #27 of 27
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The absolute best shave cream I've ever used is Musgo Real, made in Portugal and available on-line.  Just do a Google search.  I get the closest shave, smooth like a baby's butt.  It comes in a tube and only a small amount is required.  Sometimes I have to go over some of the rough spots, but the end result is terrific.  I use a Mach 3 or Mach 3 Turbo blade, both are excellent. Here's the best price I've found.   http://www.barclaycrocker.com/index.p....s_id=35 A tube lasts about 2-3 months and I buy 6 or more at a time.
Just as an FYI, based on Mano's recommendation I gave Musgo Real a try and this stuff is awesome - closet shave I've ever gotten.. I may have to give up my Philosophy Razor Sharp as a result (a product I've always loved). Panzer
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