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The Hanger Project: Affiliate thread - Page 57

post #841 of 1338
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddiemczee View Post
 

So I pulled my Saphir Renovateur out to condition my shoes, but noticed that the lid wasn't screwed on very tight. When I took off the lid, I noticed that the Renovateur was now more of a paste than a cream. When I tried applying it to my shoes, it was really hard to spread around. Is there something I can do or should I just look to get another bottle of renovatuer?


My science brain is telling me to tell you to try heating it up somehow and then mixing it around, but I'm not sure that would work.   You could try though.  Do you have home insurance? :fonz:

post #842 of 1338
Heating it up and mixing it would return things to a mixture if they've separated. However, what it sounds like is that some amount of solvent - whatever that may be for the renovateur - has evaporated. In that case then I suppose if you knew what it was you could buy and try to add some more, but that seems like a losing proposition.

How much was left in the jar?
post #843 of 1338

Actually, it turns out I've fooled myself. I accidentally grabbed a buddy of mine's neutral Saphir cream polish, which explains the sudden change in consistency. Thanks for the suggestions though!

post #844 of 1338
That would make quite a difference.
post #845 of 1338

That makes sense.

 

If it indeed was dehydrated Renovateur, I believe it would've been caused by the turpentine solvent evaporating.

post #846 of 1338
Quote:
Originally Posted by kentyman View Post

That makes sense.

If it indeed was dehydrated Renovateur, I believe it would've been caused by the turpentine solvent evaporating.

The Renovateur actually doesn't contain Turpentine -- it is water based. Regardless, leaving the lid open clearly caused it to dehydrate. Happy to replace eddiemczee if you pay for shipping, but looks like it wasn't the Renovateur after all.

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post #847 of 1338
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post

what ever happened to lorenzi of milan?

G. Lorenzi is officially over. Apparently Dunhill sent someonen with a blank check that bought out all, if not most, of their inventory. Mauro Lorenzi with CEDES, whom we carry, will carry on the torch. G. Lorenzi had a fantastic name, but was super rigid. Mauro is much more creative, has a fantastic aesthetic, and, honestly, I think will do more interesting things going forward with the same level of craftsmanship (after all - he was the guy originally producing everything for G. Lorenzi).

Few things he does for us:

Our Crocodile Collar Stay Holders:
CEDES Navy Crocodile Collar Stay Case CEDES Navy Crocodile Collar Stay Case
CEDES Crocodile Collar Stay Case CEDES Lambskin Collar Stay Case

I absolutely love this collar stay case. Beautiful, vibrant, and indulgent crocodile. Can accommodate up to three pairs of collar stays depending on the thickness. Fantastic for travel and preventing the loss of collar stays. It's these small indulgences that help define style and its peripheral essence. Available in four colors of crocodile and black lambskin.

Coming Soon: Lambskin & Shearling Travel Shoe Case



Totally indulgent lambskin travel shoe bag that is lined with lamb shearling. I mean, come on. Going to be expensive, but totally, absolutely fantastic. I've always wanted something like -- an evolution of the dream of having a Rolls Royce (or any car for that matter, given a RR is a total long-shot) with the footwell of the drivers side lined in supple lamb shearling so that I never have to worry about damaging my shoes getting in and out of the vehicle. Let me know what you guys think about this.

Got to run for lunch... will post more CEDES when I return.

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post #848 of 1338
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post

The Renovateur actually doesn't contain Turpentine -- it is water based.

I have strong doubts about this. The consistency alone is suspect without some sort of solvent to keep all of the oils mixed and in a liquid state. Also people who are sensitive to turpentine can't stand the stuff. I believe Ron Rider as mentioned how Saphir products are based on turpentine and the only product without solvents is the Nappa conditioner.
post #849 of 1338
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I have strong doubts about this. The consistency alone is suspect without some sort of solvent to keep all of the oils mixed and in a liquid state. Also people who are sensitive to turpentine can't stand the stuff. I believe Ron Rider as mentioned how Saphir products are based on turpentine and the only product without solvents is the Nappa conditioner.

Well, this is coming straight from the owner of Saphir, with whom I've spent considerable time personally. However, I'll be back at their factory in March and will be sure to specifically ask (again). It's on my list of questions. If you have any other specific questions, let me know -- I'll be sure to add them to my list and report back.

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Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

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post #850 of 1338
The Medaille D'Or version of Renovateur is Mink Oil based......no turpentine.

FDS-1123-RENOVATEURPOMMADIERHUILEDEVISON-GB-20101124.pdf 32k .pdf file
post #851 of 1338
What keeps it in such a liquid state? Doesn't make sense to me without a solvent. Mink oil at room temperature is near hard and water isn't going to keep it like that. Also, there needs to be something in it to keep it mixed if it is water based because otherwise there would be separation. Curious to hear what he has to say Kirby.

Ron, your boots have saved my life the past week. Thank you.
post #852 of 1338
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post

The Medaille D'Or version of Renovateur is Mink Oil based......no turpentine.

FDS-1123-RENOVATEURPOMMADIERHUILEDEVISON-GB-20101124.pdf 32k .pdf file

Well it does state it contains METHOXYMETHYLETHOXYPROPANOL, which I am guessing answers my question. It is use as a solvent. I am curious as to why they would use this rather than turpentine.
post #853 of 1338
@kirbya, would you recommend against "doubling up" two lightweight soft-shoulder jackets on your sportcoat hangers? I realize they weren't really designed for that, but I need to conserve some closet space.

I have four navy blazers and thought I could cut the number of hangers used from 4 to 2.
post #854 of 1338
The Return of Shoe Shine Sunday!

That's right, gentlemen. After a extended hiatus, Shoe Shine Sunday is returning and is going to be hosted our very own @RedDevil10. Between me, him, and any other guest hosts, Shoe Shine Sunday should become a permanent fixture of Style Forum.

Here's how it works: every Sunday, The Hanger Project will post to this thread photographs of us shining a pair of shoes. Every week will be a different them; however, you're welcome to post photographs of you shining anything: calf, suede, cordovan, chromexcel, etc. etc. Everyone that participates will be eligible to receive or win whatever that week's promotion is. Every week it will be different.

The prize this week for everyone that participates will be a promotional code for free shipping with no minimum.

You can also engage with us through Instagram and Twitter using the hashtag #shoeshinesunday.

Look forward to seeing everyone!

Cheers,
Kirby

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post #855 of 1338

 

That's right ladies, gentlemen and other creatures of the intertubes, we're back!  As Kirby mentioned above, today I'm posting a little look-see into one of my shoe polishing regimens and, should you like to give us all some insight into your little polishing habits (PG-13 or less, please...) by posting a photograph today of you shining/polishing your shoes, you will receive a promotional code for free shipping with no minimum purchase from Kirby Allison's Hanger Project!

Without further ado, let's get to it...

 

Today, I'm looking after a new* pair of Carmina Uetam tassel loafers in Rustic Calf that have been caught in some unfortunate New York City salt slush over the past couple of weeks.  

* (Click to show)
I almost always polish brand new shoes that I know are going to get a lot of wear using this lengthy regimen, in order that I'm confident in the finish and to ease maintenance down the road - the exception being exceptionally finished shoes [fill in the brand blank here].  My normal maintenance routine is not this in-depth.

 

The "damage"

 

 

 

My set up for this adventure includes some products that most won't really need to use on a regular basis, including Saphir Leather Cleaning Soap (mine is in the older packaging).  Also pictured below is Saphir Medaille d'Or Renovateur, Saphir Medaille d'Or Pate de Luxe Glaçage Polish in dark brown and neutral, Saphir Medaille d'Or Pommadier Cream Polish in medium brown, a small spatula brush, a large polishing brush, a cotton chamois cloth, water, water/alcohol mix, and some cotton pads.  Not pictured (because I forgot to include in this snap): Saphir Medaille d'Or Nappa Balm.

 

 

 

 

First, I brushed the kicks vigorously and thoroughly with the large polishing brush to remove any surface adulterants.

 

 

Fun brushing time!

 

 

Then, given the amount of dirt and salt accumulated on these bad boys, I broke out the Saphir Leather Cleaning Soap.  After saturating the included sponge with water and loading it up with soap, I lightly worked up a lather all over the loafers...including the soles.  That removed some polish and finish from the shoes, so I only do that when absolutely necessary.

 

 

Rub a dub dub...

 

 

Then, I let the lather dry...which, as always, took some time...

 

 

Espresso numero uno

 

 

Once dry, I lightly brushed the lather off using the large polishing brush, immediately followed by a very, very light application of Saphir Medaille d'Or Renovateur to distribute some of the remaining polish around the shoes.

 

 

Not the renovating my wife had in mind

 

 

Then, I let the Renovateur dry...which took some more time.

 

Espresso numero dos

 

 

After another round of light brushing to remove the Renovateur and softly buffing the shoes up with a cotton chamois cloth, it was time to condition a bit with Saphir Medaille d'Or Nappa Balm.  Two applications, each followed by a light buff, later it was time to clean and protect the welts using the small spatula brush and neutral Saphir Medaille d'Or Pate de Luxe Glaçage Polish.  [You don't need to use a lot of the wax polish on the brush, but do make sure to really get into the welts with some light scrubbing action — think of it as brushing one's teeth (clean off the brush as needed with a towel).]

 

 

 

No flouride required

 

 

Then it was Saphir Medaille d'Or Pommadier Cream Polish time! I used medium brown here, even though the tassel loafs are dark brown, because I wanted to add a little warmth to the color and I was going to use dark brown Saphir Medaille d'Or Pate de Luxe Glaçage Polish later.  I prefer to the non-felted side of a cotton pad to apply four to five (in this case, since it was an intensive clean and polish job), sometimes more, somewhat thin layers of cream.  I let each layer dry thoroughly, then lightly brushed and buffed with a cotton chamois cloth before repeating.  One cotton pad lasted for two to three layers on each shoe.

 

 

 

Not what it looks like

 

 

Ready for wax action

 

 

Once I was satisfied with my cream polishing, it was time to move on to Saphir Medaille d'Or Pate de Luxe Glaçage Polish in dark brown.  Use very light amounts of wax polish to create a layer on each shoe (I prefer a cotton chamois cloth for this part), then brush lightly and buff as usual.

 

 

 

Just the tip...

 

 

Finally, I decided to apply a mirror finish to the toes of each loafer because I tend to destroy the toes of all of my shoes.  This, dear internet friends, is a story for another Shoe Shine Sunday!

 

One of these things is not like the others,
One of these things just doesn't belong,
Can you tell which thing is not like the others
By the time I finish my song?
 

 

That's it for today amigos — it's time for brunch and a bloody mary because, well, I'm still alive.  

 

Remember to post a photograph today of you shining/polishing your shoes here to receive your promotional code for free shipping with no minimum purchase from Kirby Allison's Hanger Project!  I'll be checking back in on this thread throughout the day, so feel free to include any questions you might have along with your posts — who knows, the answer(s) may even be the subject of a future Shoe Shine Sunday!  You can also engage through Instagram and Twitter using the hashtag #shoeshinesunday.

 

Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/Edited with LunaPic: http://lunapic.com/

 

 


Edited by RedDevil10 - 2/16/14 at 11:15am
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