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The Hanger Project: Affiliate thread - Page 44

post #646 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post


I Colori di Antonio is shot just as beautifully as O'Mast, but, as the title suggests, really focuses on the personal story of Antonio Liverano. It is much less about tailoring as it is about a tailor. I'd give it three out of five stars. O'Mast is a classic that I will re-watch. I Colori di Antonio is something I'll only watch once... shog[1].gif

However, on this note, what I was very surprised by was I am Dandy by Rose Callahan. Based on the cover, I was expecting an esoteric book profiling impossible-to-relate-to weird dandies. These guys are certainly in the book, but it also contains profiles of many normal, but incredibly well-dressed men. I especially am enjoying the glimpses into these men's homes and personal lives.

I am Dandy
Bruce Boyer
Nick Sullivan

That's good to know as I had totally dismissed it for the same reasons you were skeptical. Maybe I'll have to reconsider.

post #647 of 1267
apillai, sent me a pair of shoes that had a bad water stain on the inside upper. He asked if the Hiver-Winter Salt Stain Remover could help remove the water stains. I was able to use some Saphir Shoe Polish products to help reduce the appearance of the water stain, and then thoroughly polished and then antiqued the shoe to further conceal the dark water stains. After spending about an hour on the shoes, I'm pretty happy with the results.

These are the steps I followed:
1. Use Saphir Reno'Mat to remove any residual polish (there was none) and reduce the appearance of the water stains.
2. Condition with Saphir Renovateur (two coats)
3. Apply three coats light brown Saphir Cream Polish
4. Antiqued the toe box and vamp with a medium brown polish

Before and After Photograph


I was able to reduce the appearance of the water stains by using Saphir Reno'Mat Cleaner (the Hiver-Winter didn't have much of an effect). But it did not eliminate them. Apillai purchased these Allen Edmond shoes on eBay, so they desperately needed to be polished. I conditioned the shoe using the Saphir Renovateur and then polished the shoe using a matching cream polish (light brown). Because these shoes have never been polished, they required between three and five coats of polish to really smooth the finish.

The light brown cream polish worked wonders for smoothing the finish, but it did not do much to conceal the darker water stains. This is where the antiquing came in, and it worked fantastically. By applying several (three) coats of the next darker polish, a medium brown, I was able to add some antiquing to the toe box and side vamps. The darkened leather almost totally concealed the water stains while adding an additional patina to the shoe that I think goes well.

Take a look at these before and after pictures of the water stain:


Moral: a little Saphir goes a long way! And don't be afraid of experimenting with different colors of shoe polish.

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post #648 of 1267
We just took delivery of our latest obscure shoeshine product for those crazy about their shoes: a High-Shine Water Dispenser (also known to chemists as a "solvent dispenser.")

A proper high-gloss shoeshine is the elusive quest of many shoe shine aficionados. Requiring untold layers of wax polish to be applied with tiny amounts of water, a mirror finish can take hours to produce. With the gentle tap of your chamois, our new "High-Shine Water Dispenser" efficiently dispenses a small amount of water, thereby readying your chamois for the next microscopic coat of wax polish.

I've had trouble creating a proper tutorial on how to produce a high-gloss mirror shine because of how nuanced the technique can be. How much water? How much pressure? How many coats? Etc. etc. I'm experimenting with some short videos on the process. Take a look and let me know what you think.

Edited by kirbya - 10/8/13 at 2:21pm

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post #649 of 1267
Nice videos.
post #650 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post

apillai, sent me a pair of shoes that had a bad water stain on the inside upper. He asked if the Hiver-Winter Salt Stain Remover could help remove the water stains. I was able to use some Saphir Shoe Polish products to help reduce the appearance of the water stain, and then thoroughly polished and then antiqued the shoe to further conceal the dark water stains. After spending about an hour on the shoes, I'm pretty happy with the results.

These are the steps I followed:
1. Use Saphir Reno'Mat to remove any residual polish (there was none) and reduce the appearance of the water stains.
2. Condition with Saphir Renovateur (two coats)
3. Apply three coats light brown Saphir Cream Polish
4. Antiqued the toe box and vamp with a medium brown polish

Before and After Photograph


I was able to reduce the appearance of the water stains by using Saphir Reno'Mat Cleaner (the Hiver-Winter didn't have much of an effect). But it did not eliminate them. Apillai purchased these Allen Edmond shoes on eBay, so they desperately needed to be polished. I conditioned the shoe using the Saphir Renovateur and then polished the shoe using a matching cream polish (light brown). Because these shoes have never been polished, they required between three and five coats of polish to really smooth the finish.

The light brown cream polish worked wonders for smoothing the finish, but it did not do much to conceal the darker water stains. This is where the antiquing came in, and it worked fantastically. By applying several (three) coats of the next darker polish, a medium brown, I was able to add some antiquing to the toe box and side vamps. The darkened leather almost totally concealed the water stains while adding an additional patina to the shoe that I think goes well.

Take a look at these before and after pictures of the water stain:


Moral: a little Saphir goes a long way! And don't be afraid of experimenting with different colors of shoe polish.

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
This is fantastic.  Really appreciate the work.  Picking up some Saphir today.  Thanks Kirby. 
post #651 of 1267
I wanted to provide The Hanger Project some proper feedback:

I ordered about $85 worth of leather cleaning products on September 28th- Usually they ship items within a few days. About seven days later I sent an email to find out the ETA on the order as some of the items were for a gift. I received their automated email right away and then an email later the following day that said the warehouse has dealt with moving issues and will be shipping that day. I then received an email with tracking- so I decided to track the item and it said label created. A couple days later after the tracking information never changed, I decided to once again call them. I was told that the items were shipping that day and should have them in a couple days. A couple days later I called and actually spoke with Kirby who told me the items shipped the day before. I told him thank you- but before I hung up he checked with his warehouse and the items were still there and had not shipped.

Kirby told me due to the issues I had he would ship the order for free- I thought that was a good customer service move and thanked him. Well guess what,......he never shipped them.

Terrible service with a owner that over promises and under delivers.
post #652 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsherman02 View Post

I wanted to provide The Hanger Project some proper feedback:

I ordered about $85 worth of leather cleaning products on September 28th- Usually they ship items within a few days. About seven days later I sent an email to find out the ETA on the order as some of the items were for a gift. I received their automated email right away and then an email later the following day that said the warehouse has dealt with moving issues and will be shipping that day. I then received an email with tracking- so I decided to track the item and it said label created. A couple days later after the tracking information never changed, I decided to once again call them. I was told that the items were shipping that day and should have them in a couple days. A couple days later I called and actually spoke with Kirby who told me the items shipped the day before. I told him thank you- but before I hung up he checked with his warehouse and the items were still there and had not shipped.

Kirby told me due to the issues I had he would ship the order for free- I thought that was a good customer service move and thanked him. Well guess what,......he never shipped them.

Terrible service with a owner that over promises and under delivers.

Jeffrey -

I apologize for this breakdown. Yes, we are certainly working through some growing pains in the warehouse that resulted in about a two week disruption to service. When you called, we pulled your order, refunded it, per your request, and have been waiting for a resolution within the warehouse before shipping it out to you (for free - on us - because of our mistakes).

You will be receiving your polish, and it will be sent totally free, because of this. Again - apologize to your friend for us. This week most things have totally returned to normal, save a few orders lost in the cracks, yours being one.

My sincerest apologies,

Kirby

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post #653 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherGuido View Post

RE: Trouser hangers

If closet configuration is not a concern (i.e. one's closet can accommodate either the folding or the clip/clamp), is there a "matrix" of suggested trouser hanger for each type of pant (i.e. is one type of hanger better for a cuffed dress flannel while another might be better for an uncuffed casual poplin?  My sole priority is preserving the best appearance when the trouser comes off the hanger - good drape, no clamp marks, no thigh crease/curve.

Thanks!

FatherGuido -

If your sole concern is preserving the best appearance when the trouser comes off of the hanger and you have no space constraints, I would recommend the Clamping Trouser Hanger. By hanging the trousers upside-down, the weight of the seat provides a "soft press" and since there is no fold, there is also no level surface on which dust can settle.

I use a combination in my closet, but primarily out of personal preference and space constraints. Items that need the "soft press," such as my denim and linen, are hung on the Clamping Trouser Hanger. All other items, aka. my suiting trousers, are hung on a Felted Trouser Bar.

We are out of the Clamping Trouser Hangers at the moment, but should have some in stock within two weeks.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Kirby

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post #654 of 1267



Gentlemen -

Excited to announce the launch of our inaugural collection of Inis Meain Knitwear. Hand knitted off of the western coast of Ireland in iconic Aran Island designs, these sweaters have their heritage steeped deeply in the traditions of old fishing villages and have warmed generations of fisherman in the wet and windy climate of Galaway Bay.

I know that many of you are already familiar with Inis Meain - several other StyleForum vendors carry them. Their knitwear is comes with a fantastic story. The company was founded in 1976 by Tarlach de Blacam and his wife Aine, an islander, to bring back to life the island's traditional fisherman knitwear that had disappeared over time. Drawing on the island’s long heritage, Inis Meain draws on a huge repertoire of local hand-knitters, sometimes using old photographs of island knits for inspiration, even reproducing them in some cases.

For centuries, the fishermen’s garments were knitted by the women of the island. Knitting was just one of a number of skills that islanders had to learn and to master, to create a way of living in a very inhospitable place. Their sweaters represent the best of pre-globalized micro-cultures that produced clothing not for fashion but out of necessity. The harsh wet, windy climate fisherman endured in the Galway Bay required hardy, warm knitewear that could withstand the climate. Over the centuries, a rich style emerged that gave way to the iconic "Aran Cable."

Take a look and enjoy...

Cheers,

Kirby

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Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

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post #655 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post


This is friggin' awesome. The donegal V-neck as well, but this.
post #656 of 1267
Also, I am annoyed by just how much I like the Dartmoor Polo. That thing went on with the right pair of trousers and just looked awesome.
post #657 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post

apillai, sent me a pair of shoes that had a bad water stain on the inside upper. He asked if the Hiver-Winter Salt Stain Remover could help remove the water stains. I was able to use some Saphir Shoe Polish products to help reduce the appearance of the water stain, and then thoroughly polished and then antiqued the shoe to further conceal the dark water stains. After spending about an hour on the shoes, I'm pretty happy with the results.

These are the steps I followed:
1. Use Saphir Reno'Mat to remove any residual polish (there was none) and reduce the appearance of the water stains.
2. Condition with Saphir Renovateur (two coats)
3. Apply three coats light brown Saphir Cream Polish
4. Antiqued the toe box and vamp with a medium brown polish

Before and After Photograph


I was able to reduce the appearance of the water stains by using Saphir Reno'Mat Cleaner (the Hiver-Winter didn't have much of an effect). But it did not eliminate them. Apillai purchased these Allen Edmond shoes on eBay, so they desperately needed to be polished. I conditioned the shoe using the Saphir Renovateur and then polished the shoe using a matching cream polish (light brown). Because these shoes have never been polished, they required between three and five coats of polish to really smooth the finish.

The light brown cream polish worked wonders for smoothing the finish, but it did not do much to conceal the darker water stains. This is where the antiquing came in, and it worked fantastically. By applying several (three) coats of the next darker polish, a medium brown, I was able to add some antiquing to the toe box and side vamps. The darkened leather almost totally concealed the water stains while adding an additional patina to the shoe that I think goes well.

Take a look at these before and after pictures of the water stain:


Moral: a little Saphir goes a long way! And don't be afraid of experimenting with different colors of shoe polish.

 

Can't see if the water stain is cleaned.  It is at best concealed by the new color...

post #658 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Can't see if the water stain is cleaned.  It is at best concealed by the new color...

You're right - and I believe that I even pointed that out, right? I wasn't able to get the water stain to disappear (if anyone knows how to do this, please let me know). But the antiquing and polishing did effectively conceal it. It would be unnoticed by anyone who didn't already know a water stain was there.

apillai should have his shoes by now and can chime in personally.

Saphir Shoe Polish  -  Shoe Shine Guides

Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

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post #659 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by mktitsworth View Post

Also, I am annoyed by just how much I like the Dartmoor Polo. That thing went on with the right pair of trousers and just looked awesome.

Fantastic knit polo. We've just got one left in each of the following sizes: small, medium, and extra-large




I apologize for the quality of the photographs. The navy is so dark that it's impossible to get any detail. It's such a dark navy that it really could be black... Fantastic item and especially great for Texas weather.

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post #660 of 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post


You're right - and I believe that I even pointed that out, right? I wasn't able to get the water stain to disappear (if anyone knows how to do this, please let me know). But the antiquing and polishing did effectively conceal it. It would be unnoticed by anyone who didn't already know a water stain was there.

apillai should have his shoes by now and can chime in personally.

 

I don't think the Avel product is for water stain but more for salt/snow stain.  Shoes in question appears to be soaked from the outsole.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I don't know if there is anything you can do...it often depends on the leather. Water stains tend to be pretty hard to get rid of especially on light coloured or poorly tanned leather. When shoes get that wet, residual tanning compounds, superfluous dye stuff, and even salts get deposited in greater concentrations in just the same way that the tide leaves a line of spin drift and detritus on the beach as it recedes. One thing you can try if you are game...get your shoes entirely wet again. Fill a bucket with warm water and chuck them in there and let them sit say, four hours, completely submerged. Pull them out, shake or towel off the excess water and cover them with a liberal wash of Lexol (in the tan container). If you have R.M. Williams Saddle Dressing or anything like it, coat the leather with that, as well. Both of these products will slow down the drying until the moisture can even itself out. The R.M. Williams is actually a little better at this than the Lexol but several coating of Lexol may compensate. Turn the shoes upside down and allow to dry slowly, applying more Lexol as necessary. You might even rotate the shoesupside down, on their sides, right-side up, etc.--if they seem to be drying too fast on one side of the shoe or the other. If the shoe has a chance to dry slowly and evenly, sometimes...sometimes...those residual chemicals and dye stuffs can be redistributed. When thoroughly dry, recoat everything, inside and out with Lexol and polish. Now for the disclaimer, if your shoes are gemmed or have paper insoles, etc., etc., they may be damaged by this treatment (if they are not already damaged). But if they are well made shoes, and you assiduously recondition them, you should not damage them and you may get them back to an even, or very nearly even, colour. Second discalimer...again with the tannage and the quality of the leather...this is not guaranteed to work and it may not be for the faint of heart. But when it works it's dern near a miracle.
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