or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Hanger Project: Affiliate thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Hanger Project: Affiliate thread - Page 91

post #1351 of 1363

@RedDevil10 Just what we were all wondering at some point. Thank You.

post #1352 of 1363
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedDevil10 View Post

The Mirror Q&A Edition

Over the past year I've received quite a few questions, the overwhelming majority of which relate to the "mirror shine."  So, in lieu of a full-blown polish routine I'm addressing a few of the most common "mirror shine" questions, as I work on refinishing the toes on a pair of my Saint Crispin's jodhpurs.  Join me by posting before and after photos here of your own polish job today!
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Remember to also cross-post to InstagramTwitterFacebook or Tumblr (using the hashtag #shoeshinesunday)!

Without further ado, let's get to it...

Q.  How do I prepare my shoes for a "mirror shine?"

A.  Preparation of course depends on the condition of the shoes, where a brand-new pair likely doesn't require much preparation at all, but a well-worn pair would likely require a thorough cleaning with the appropriate agent (e.g., Renovateur, Neutral Cream Polish, Reno'mat, etc.).  Ideally, the surface would then be prepared with some initial coats of wax, which have been applied, dried, and then brushed, à la:
DSC_0809_DxO
Prepared


Q.  Do I use a cloth, a t-shirt, a chamois, or what?  And how much polish do I use?

A.  I like using cotton pads or cotton balls because I am able to get a better feel for the amount of pressure I'm using when applying the wax polish to the shoe.  However, you can use whatever you feel most comfortable with.  As for the amount of wax polish per layer:
DSC_0811_DxO
That's It, Really


Q.  Speaking of pressure, how much pressure do I use?

A.  The amount of pressure you use when applying the wax polish will vary throughout the process, as the more wax you apply to the shoe, the less pressure you need to work in the wax polish.  By way of example, for each layer I usually apply the wax polish gently at first, increase pressure while I'm working the wax polish from hazy to clear, and then back pressure off to finish each layer with a buff.  
DSC_0812_DxO
Wax Haze


Q.  What about using water?  Or should I use alcohol?  If either, how much?

A.  I recommend using both water and rubbing alcohol (90%+), in a 3:1 or 4:1 water:alcohol mixture.  Alternatively, you can just use water or, depending on the consistency of the wax polish you're using, you may not need water or a water:alcohol mixture at all.  If you do, then this is really all you need per layer of wax polish:
DSC_0813_DxO
A Drop Will Do

As you work the wax polish from hazy to clear your cloth/pad/chamois should move freely across the surface of the leather, i.e., you should feel like you are "pushing" the wax polish around easily.  If the cloth/pad/chamois feels "sticky" or is dragging on the leather, you either used too much wax polish or you need to add a bit more water or water:alcohol mixture (or both).  

Q.  I've heard "heat and friction" are key...but my hands can't move like an orbital waxer (yet)?

A.  True, heat and friction play a significant role, but you don't need to and shouldn't rub wax polish into your shoes with wild abandon.  You should be able to achieve a "mirror shine" with moderate effort.  Again, if the wax polish layer you're applying isn't turning from hazy to clear, your cloth/pad/chamois will most likely feel "sticky" or drag on the leather...so...see above.

After a few layers of wax polish properly applied with moderate effort, your shoes should start to gloss up:
 DSC_0814_DxO
Getting There
DSC_0816_DxO
Getting Closer
 DSC_0818_DxO
Even Closer


Q.  How do I know when I'm finished?

A.  As with many subjective matters, "you'll know when you see it."  
  DSC_0821_DxO
Terminé, au moins sur la droite...


Remember to post photographs here today of you shining/polishing your shoes (before and after, please) and also to cross-post your photos on InstagramTwitterFacebook or Tumblr (using the hashtag #shoeshinesunday).

I'll be checking back in on this thread throughout the day, so feel free to include any questions you might have along with your posts — who knows, the answer(s) may even be the subject of a future Shoe Shine Sunday!  

Thanks for taking the time to document your mirror shine technique.

How long does it take to rub the wax/water combination from hazy to clear?

Once you've achieved clarity how long do you wait to apply the next wax/water combination?
post #1353 of 1363

What I got after about 30 min of work on a pair of AE:

 

post #1354 of 1363

General Q&A Edition

 

Last week I answered a few questions relating to the "mirror shine."  However, I often receive other shoe shine related questions and thought that those who have posed questions in the past, or perhaps those who have only thought of asking questions, might appreciate a question and answer session today.  So, please ask any shoe shine related questions you might have today in this thread and they will be answered.  In addition, feel free to join in by posting before and after photos here of your own polish job!

 

Remember to also cross-post to InstagramTwitterFacebook or Tumblr (using the hashtag #shoeshinesunday)!

 

Ready...set...

post #1355 of 1363

When I was working some wax into the toe of my shoes, a few times it felt almost like the cloth started to drag and mess up a small area of shine that started to develop.  Almost like a scraping effect.  Too much wax? Rubbing to hard? 

post #1356 of 1363
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradp View Post

When I was working some wax into the toe of my shoes, a few times it felt almost like the cloth started to drag and mess up a small area of shine that started to develop.  Almost like a scraping effect.  Too much wax? Rubbing to hard? 

Hard to say. You definitely want to first slightly wet your chamois and then use a TINY amount of wax. You can have a wet rag and tap it your chamois our use our High Shine Water Dispenser. Then, as you are massaging the wax into the shoe, you want to use light pressure.

I know that RedDevil10 mixes a little bit of alcohol with his water to accelerate the evaporation of water and speed up the process of creating a high-gloss mirror shine. It can take forever.

Don't forget to post your pictures!

Cheers,

Kirby

Saphir Shoe Polish  -  Shoe Shine Guides

Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

Reply

Saphir Shoe Polish  -  Shoe Shine Guides

Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

Reply
post #1357 of 1363

Thanks, kirby.  Makes sense--I strongly suspect I used too much wax.  Other thing I was wondering is, how long do you continue rubbing in a given coat of wax after it's completely absorbed (ie, no longer hazy and actually looks shiny).  Does it accomplish anything to continue working it once it's already shiny or should you just move on to another coat.  

 

Posted my results upthread, it turned out decently well but I was winging it and can do better.  

post #1358 of 1363
@bradp Once the polish clears up, stop and allow it to dry before continuing onto the next coat. @RedDevil10 and I are actually planning to work on an extensive Mirror Shine Tutorial. We're trying to figure out how to best approach because so much of the technique is nuance.

Saphir Shoe Polish  -  Shoe Shine Guides

Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

Reply

Saphir Shoe Polish  -  Shoe Shine Guides

Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

Reply
post #1359 of 1363

thanks, looking forward to the tutorial.  and pardon the glare on my HP trees up there ^^ :slayer:

post #1360 of 1363
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradp View Post

When I was working some wax into the toe of my shoes, a few times it felt almost like the cloth started to drag and mess up a small area of shine that started to develop.  Almost like a scraping effect.  Too much wax? Rubbing to hard? 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bradp View Post

Thanks, kirby.  Makes sense--I strongly suspect I used too much wax.  Other thing I was wondering is, how long do you continue rubbing in a given coat of wax after it's completely absorbed (ie, no longer hazy and actually looks shiny).  Does it accomplish anything to continue working it once it's already shiny or should you just move on to another coat.  

Posted my results upthread, it turned out decently well but I was winging it and can do better.  

It's more likely that you didn't have enough water involved. Too much wax will often create a "sticky" feeling, whereas lack of water will usually create the "scraping" feeling you describe.

As Kirby mentioned, once you have worked the wax from hazy to clear/shiny, move on to the next coat.
post #1361 of 1363
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post

@bradp Once the polish clears up, stop and allow it to dry before continuing onto the next coat. @RedDevil10 and I are actually planning to work on an extensive Mirror Shine Tutorial. We're trying to figure out how to best approach because so much of the technique is nuance.

How long does it take to rub the wax/water combination from hazy to clear? And if you can't achieve clarity should you add more water? More wax?

Once you've achieved clarity how long do you wait to apply the next wax/water combination? How do you know when it's dry and ready for the next coat? How many coats on average do you need?
post #1362 of 1363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odd I/O View Post

How long does it take to rub the wax/water combination from hazy to clear? And if you can't achieve clarity should you add more water? More wax?

Once you've achieved clarity how long do you wait to apply the next wax/water combination? How do you know when it's dry and ready for the next coat? How many coats on average do you need?

Generally not very long, in the neighborhood of 20-30 seconds. More wax is usually never the answer, as only a minute amount of wax is necessary to begin with, so usually a bit more water is needed if the wax isn't working in well (also dial back on the amount of wax being used).

I let the first 5 or so coats dry for 5-10 minutes, respectively. Thereafter, you can usually proceed without letting each layer sit to dry. You know it is ready for the next coat when the wax has turned from hazy to glossy, almost clear.

As for the number of layers, I often lose count but I'll make a point of counting the next time I polish.

- RD
post #1363 of 1363
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedDevil10 View Post

Generally not very long, in the neighborhood of 20-30 seconds. More wax is usually never the answer, as only a minute amount of wax is necessary to begin with, so usually a bit more water is needed if the wax isn't working in well (also dial back on the amount of wax being used).

I let the first 5 or so coats dry for 5-10 minutes, respectively. Thereafter, you can usually proceed without letting each layer sit to dry. You know it is ready for the next coat when the wax has turned from hazy to glossy, almost clear.

As for the number of layers, I often lose count but I'll make a point of counting the next time I polish.

- RD

Thank you!

I'm going to give your techniques a try the next time I polish my shoes.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Hanger Project: Affiliate thread