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Scarves in your wardrobe

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
In honor of ernest's cashmere scarf search and the FIH scarf clearance sale, I thought it might be well to discuss the issue more generally. I've not been a frequent scarf wearer but this season have acquired two nicer ones, a Donegal herringbone tweed and a Drake's multicolored plaid lambswool from Ben Silver. Both are great and really add an amazing amount of visual interest for the outlay. (Will try to post a pic of them later.) What strategy (or 'strategery' ) do you prefer on scarf wearing--colors, tying methods, etc.? How many do y'all generally have in your wardrobe. I've probably added enough for this season, but next year I may be on the cashmere scarf hunt, too. I wonder if H&K carries any...
post #2 of 20
I have a few plain cashmere scarves that I wear on occasion, but to be honest I find myself going back to the old "school-boy" scarves from J.Press (although usually not with a suit and overcoat). I like the way they look, and they're hard wearing. Of course I still wear a duffle coat, and have had two hairstyles since birth.
post #3 of 20
I tend to go through phases with my scarves, but I always go back to the cashmere. I have a few vintage ones, and pick up a couple of wool ones every year, always looking for that 'perfect' scarf lol.
post #4 of 20
I have many opportunities to wear scarves (or mufflers, as we sometimes call them) as here in New England winter is a long season. I believe in making a virtue of necessity, however, and have come to regard scarves as the neckties of outerwear, adding a touch of richness or whimsy to one's seasonal armor. Although I haven't nearly as many scarves as ties (which is a mighty good thing, as they'd be much bulkier to store), I have a couple dozen in various colors and patterns, weights, widths, lengths, etc., and enjoy coordinating them both with my coat or jacket and whatever I may be wearing underneath. (How I tie them depends on the length of the scarf and the weather itself.) Some are more formal (solid cashmeres or jacquard paisleys), others casual in feeling (stripes, plaids or other bold motifs). Sometimes I favor a low-contrast approach in which texture predominates; at other times I crave an unexpected note of color to brighten an otherwise dreary day. Naturally hats and gloves enter into the equation as well. Today, for example, we have snow in Boston that's expected to change over to rain, and so, rather than exposing a more dressy coat to this slop, I decided to wear my 20-year-old knee-length navy-blue down-filled storm coat with red wool plaid lining, which I reserve for such days. I relieved this garment from dullness by adding a red cashmere scarf, fringed idiosyncratically on the long sides rather than the ends, a red wool cap (from J. Crew) and red suede Portolano gloves. But it's the scarf that pulls the whole snowy-day look together. As you can see, it's hard for me to imagine getting through the winter without a well-stocke scarf wardrobe. Surely other members who live in cold climates must feel the same.
post #5 of 20
I tend to favor silk, as cashmere may be slightly irritating against bare skin.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I believe in making a virtue of necessity, however, and have come to regard scarves as the neckties of outerwear, adding a touch of richness or whimsy to one's seasonal armor.
Yes--exactly the way I've been approaching it. Neckties for outerwear.
post #7 of 20
I don't have a large number of scarves -- may 5 or 6. It just doesn't get that cold here in DC. I also tend to favor a blue cashmere one I've had for years. On the issue of how to use them, while I normally just wear it around my neck underneath my coat, if it's colder than usual out and I have someplace to walk to, I like to tie the scarf in a simple overhand knot; once tied, I adjust and turn the knot so it wears a bit like a necktie. It's a more dressy, elegant way to wear a scarf IMO, though it seems to work best with wool or cashmere than thin silk scarves.
post #8 of 20
Quote:
I tend to favor silk, as cashmere may be slightly irritating against bare skin.
So I am wondering this... I have gotten requests for this kind of item, I have seen them around but usually with a very ugly printed silk. Is there a market or interest, for Silk on one side and a Cashmere on the other? Essentially two layers, one side a silk (smooth of course) and the other cashmere? If so a basic solid cashemre? I am seriousely considering this for the next winter season A/I 2005. JJF
post #9 of 20
How about woven silk scarves? You can make them as thick as you want. I am in San Francisco, and the only times that I wear scarf are trips to the right coast or ski slopes. I have a woven silk scarf with a front layer of silk sewed to a back layer. It is very pretty and thick.
post #10 of 20
So I am wondering this... I have gotten requests for this kind of item, I have seen them around but usually with a very ugly printed silk. Is there a market or interest, for Silk on one side and a Cashmere on the other? Essentially two layers, one side a silk (smooth of course) and the other cashmere? If so a basic solid cashemre? I am seriousely considering this for the next winter season A/I 2005. JJF These can be handsome, and are popular among smartly dressed businessmen here in Boston. Personally, I find it a bit aging for some reason, but at 46 I've decided I'm too young to adopt it.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Quote:
(Fabienne @ 06 Jan. 2005, 11:50) I tend to favor silk, as cashmere may be slightly irritating against bare skin.
So I am wondering this... I have gotten requests for this kind of item, I have seen them around but usually with a very ugly printed silk. Is there a market or interest, for Silk on one side and a Cashmere on the other?  Essentially two layers, one side a silk (smooth of course) and the other cashmere? If so a basic solid cashemre? I am seriousely considering this for the next winter season A/I 2005. JJF
I have one like this - thick blue silk with embroidered elephants on one side and blue cashmere on the other. this is my favorite scarf when I am wearing my topcoat. I love it. I also have a black cashere, a black pashmina (which I wear like a kafia, thrown around my neck and shoulders under a coat), a gray wool in a tartanish patern. I saw a while back a scarf made out of contraband goat wool - or more accurately, the underbelly of a mountain antelope from tibet and nepal. Illigal, they sell for several hundred bucks in india, but they are so soft and light you can't believe. Next time I get a chance I would like to add one to my wardrobe.
post #12 of 20
So what about H&K scarves? Sales price in Paris = 175 euros Sales price in London £45 I know that the ties in Paris are not the same as in London as they are "made in France" in a better silk. The scarves seem to be the same. The tags are the same, both are made in UK. Any explaination?
post #13 of 20
Personal Opinion: There is NO cashmere scarf, throw, or blanket that can equal Alex Begg of Scotland. FIH Ties: I have made a number of the silk/reverse/cash scarves you describe. Clients absolutely love them. They should sell quite well. You're less likely to get stuck with them in plain colors. Don't forget a few black & whites and white & whites.
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
On the other end of things I walked through Banana Republic today and they have all their scarves on sale, some as low as $14.99. Their cashmere scarves were at $29.99. Some nice designs and a decent hand. Made in China, of course. Likely you could catch them a touch cheaper in a couple of weeks.
post #15 of 20
Does Begg make scarves under various labels too? I thought the Hermes scarves are made by Begg, as well as a few others good ones that I have seen.
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