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Newest watch Purchase - Page 2

post #16 of 31
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(drizzt3117 @ 06 Jan. 2005, 9:44) Rolex makes their own movements.
But very basic movements...
So?
post #17 of 31
I apologize, I mispoke slightly, Rolex makes their own movements, except for the movement in the Daytona Chronograph, which is made by Zenith. Yes they are very simple, but Rolexes are very simple watches, except for the Daytona Chronograph.
post #18 of 31
Thread Starter 
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I apologize, I mispoke slightly, Rolex makes their own movements, except for the movement in the Daytona Chronograph, which is made by Zenith.  Yes they are very simple, but Rolexes are very simple watches, except for the Daytona Chronograph.
Funny you should mention that. Though I mostly favour simple watches, the Daytona is the only Rolex I'd ever buy. However I don't really have a need for a sports watch, but you never know. I find it a very striking watch for some reason, yet for me all other Rolexes fall flat.
post #19 of 31
Yeah, I have a two-tone Daytona and want a SS one but it is almost impossible to get right now (waiting list) although a place in Laguna Beach has them, albeit at full retail. It's a nice watch although I almost never wear it because I think gold doesn't go well with my skin tone.
post #20 of 31
Thread Starter 
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Yeah, I have a two-tone Daytona and want a SS one but it is almost impossible to get right now (waiting list) although a place in Laguna Beach has them, albeit at full retail.  It's a nice watch although I almost never wear it because I think gold doesn't go well with my skin tone.
I normally also do not liek two tone, but something about that the Daytona is very appealing. Two tone, white face. In the summer I get quite tanned, but in the winter I think a Daytona against my complexion would look a little weird. Generally gold only looks good on South Americans, Southern Europeans, Africans (not the white variety like myself, unless we get really tanned, which goes for any caucasian), and Indians.
post #21 of 31
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(MilanoStyle @ 06 Jan. 2005, 07:27) Honestly, if I was to care about accuracy of time, I would wear quartz watch.
Or a Patek
My Patek windup which was set several days ago had the same time as the "atomic"--i.e., WWV radio controled--digital had. I've had it for 20 or so years, however, the drawback is that it is very delicate by design and most expensive (beyond belief) to repair. My automatic Rolex--30+ years old--is much more durable. I've a Piaget Polo automatic that several years old and it seems highly accurate also. Though, of course, my Ebel quartz is the most accurate but when it died I had to send it to the factory for an ouch of a repair bill.
post #22 of 31
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Oris Miles Tonneau I'm happy with the purchase. A good price, and the seller comes highly recommended. I saw one the other day in a store and can't wait to get mine. I thought instead of buying the Cartier Roadster at $5000, I could buy something with arguably better looks (definately more refined) at a lesser cost. I didn't mind the prospect of spending the $5000, but given that I want a watch for everyday wear to the gym and class, I am happy I didn't buy something that expensive.
I have a very similar watch. It sits on my wrist like a loaf of bread. I love it.
post #23 of 31
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(PHV @ 05 Jan. 2005, 10:43) Oris Miles Tonneau I'm happy with the purchase. A good price, and the seller comes highly recommended. I saw one the other day in a store and can't wait to get mine. I thought instead of buying the Cartier Roadster at $5000, I could buy something with arguably better looks (definately more refined) at a lesser cost. I didn't mind the prospect of spending the $5000, but given that I want a watch for everyday wear to the gym and class, I am happy I didn't buy something that expensive.
I have a very similar watch.  It sits on my wrist like a loaf of bread.  I love it.
The only reason i stayed away from that one, was because the chronograph dials cover way too much of the shave.
post #24 of 31
I have issues with automatic watches because I don't wear them that much of the day, and don't really like to go with a winder, I have to set them every couple days, so accuracy is really really really moot.
post #25 of 31
Thread Starter 
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I have issues with automatic watches because I don't wear them that much of the day, and don't really like to go with a winder, I have to set them every couple days, so accuracy is really really really moot.
How long do you have to wear an automatic for it to work properly?
post #26 of 31
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(PeterMetro @ 07 Jan. 2005, 4:01)
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Originally Posted by PHV,05 Jan. 2005, 10:43
Oris Miles Tonneau I'm happy with the purchase. A good price, and the seller comes highly recommended. I saw one the other day in a store and can't wait to get mine. I thought instead of buying the Cartier Roadster at $5000, I could buy something with arguably better looks (definately more refined) at a lesser cost. I didn't mind the prospect of spending the $5000, but given that I want a watch for everyday wear to the gym and class, I am happy I didn't buy something that expensive.
I have a very similar watch.  It sits on my wrist like a loaf of bread.  I love it.
The only reason i stayed away from that one, was because the chronograph dials cover way too much of the shave.
Is it really that big on you? I saw a couple and they didn't seem attrociously large. Around the size of a Baume&Mercier Capeland.
post #27 of 31
It depends what you are doing while wearing it, as your body's movement winds the watch, but I usually take it off when I am in my office and at home because I have plenty of clocks and if I'm using the computer I don't like to be wearing a watch (especially one as large as a Breitling Crosswind Special) I probably wear the watch a couple hours of the day at most (unless I am out and about all day, in which case the watch works perfectly) I would imagine that you'll be OK if you wore it for 8-10 hours a day.
post #28 of 31
For clarification: ETA and GP are two separate entities, thus each manufactures their own movements, and does not share them with one another, save for when they need to purchase spring components from Swatch-owned Nivarox (Swatch also owns ETA). Yes, Bvlgari uses movements manufactured by both companies, but that really is inconsequential, since GP cal. 3000-based / GP 220 movements really are incomparable to ETA's 2892 and / or 2824, different kinds of movements, designed for different purposes. It is not true that when "˜companies' modify ETA's movements they barely resemble the original. Alas, the only prominent complications that are / can be regularly added to a 2892 is either a perpetual calendar or a modular chronograph; granted more technically complexities can and have been added, i.e. alarm, but for the most part, other movements are more apt for the task. As well most watch "˜companies' don't modify anything. Only a handful actually have the technical skill to modify movements to the level of complexity you are describing. If modifications were so easy to perform, individual master watch makers such as the members of the AHCI and individual firms such as Renaud et Papi (now part of AP), Dubois-Depraz, and Kelek (now part of Breitling) would be out of a job. These match makers / specialty companies design and create individual complications for watch companies. The two most reworked movements used in wristwatches that I can recall are: 1) IWC "˜Il Destriero Scafusia': based movement Valjoux cal. 7760, modified to include Rattrapante, Tourbillon, Perpetual Calendar, Moon phases, and Minute Repeater. 2) Ulysse Nardin "˜Ludwig Perpetual (and variants)': Lemania cal. 1352, the integrated chronograph is completely removed and the main plate and subsequent bridges utterly reworked to fit the worlds only forward / backwards crown-settable perpetual calendar. Rolex's movements are basic in only that they do not have complications. Rolex's movements were designed for one purpose: to serve mid-to-heavy duty everyday working requirements. Thus, they are simple to fix, made of thick pieces and can take a beating. If I were to compare the Rolex cal. 3135 (as found in a Submariner) with another movement manufactured by another company, I would probably look first towards the ETA 2892. Rolex used to utilize the Zenith El Primero chronograph movement for the Daytona, but now utilizes their own in-house chronograph movement cal. 4130, which oddly is based more on the technical aspects used in the F. Piguet cal. 1185 than those used by Zenith. Rolex's are inheritably designed to be more durable than Patek's, such is their individual design. At the same time, a Submariner looks as good with a tuxedo as a hand wound perpetual calendar Patek can be used for diving, to each watch it's own. Yes, Ebel's repair dept. thinks that they are Patek with what they charge, especially to replace $10 ETA quartz movements. Jon.
post #29 of 31
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Have you ever looked and studied an ETA movement versus a Patek, JLC, or Rolex movement? I've posted detailed breakdown documents of the movements and what makes them tick, there isn't much (if any difference) between the materials and design used in an ETA versus a PP versus a AP or JLC movement.  There's a fancy cover piece, and they are rare, is that worth $10k to you?
I had promised myself not to "touch" a watch thread in the Style forum but I am terribly sorry yours I cannot pass up. The difference between a basic ETA and a JLC or even a Patek movement is huge. I will not go to technical explanations on the merit of free sprung escapement,the beauty of cotes de Geneve or chamfering but to give a Style members an analogy to what you just said, that if you compare a suit from the Man's warehouse and a Kiton bespoke 180's, that there is not much difference between the material and the design. They are both suit and both made of wool. I would say that the difference is as wide as a mountain  for the discerning eyes and cannot even compare. Sure, Mc donalds will sell you beef and so will Morton's. The one who knows just know, the one who does not know, does not need to know. and yes I have studied a few Patek, and a few ETA and even visited their respective Manufacture. William
post #30 of 31
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(drizzt3117 @ 06 Jan. 2005, 09:47) Have you ever looked and studied an ETA movement versus a Patek, JLC, or Rolex movement? I've posted detailed breakdown documents of the movements and what makes them tick, there isn't much (if any difference) between the materials and design used in an ETA versus a PP versus a AP or JLC movement. There's a fancy cover piece, and they are rare, is that worth $10k to you?
I had promised myself not to "touch" a watch thread in the SL forum but I am terribly sorry yours I cannot pass up. The difference between a basic ETA and a JLC or even a Patek movement is huge. I will not go to technical explanations on the merit of free sprung escapement, beauty of cote de Geneve or chamfering but to give a SL member an analogy what you just said is that if you compare a suit from the Man's warehouse and a Kiton bespoke 180's, that there is not much difference between the material and the design. They are both suit made of wool. I would say that the difference is as wide as a mountain for the discerning eyes and cannot even compare. Sure, Mc donalds will give you beef and so will Morton's. The one who knows just know, the one who does not know, does not need to know. and yes I have studies a few Patek, and a few ETA and even visited their respective Manufacture. William
Absolutely correct. (As stated by my fellow WIS are the same reasons I did not discuss technicalities such as gyromax vs. Etachron) William, I have not really delved into watches in a few months (gulp. perhaps 6?) but, what I wrote above, I did so from memory, did it serve me correct? Jon.
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