or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › start of dropping out, downsizing, divesting
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

start of dropping out, downsizing, divesting - Page 2

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
With shirts and suits, I'll get rid of them not because it is worn out, but its because I am tired of wearing it. Shirt needs to be replaced every season I think.
Having grown up wearing hand-me-downs, old quality shirts have a character and feel that new shirts don't.
post #17 of 22
Still kind of doubtful about the whole "reoxygenization" thing. I mean, I understand that it's good to air out your shirt on a hanger (because if you don't, you'll get a wrinkled shirt) but I would think that cotton, once spun and woven into shirting, would be entirely neutral to this sort of thing, inert. I still have to find a good shirtmaker where I live. They're not easy to come by.
post #18 of 22
Alias
Quote:
I would think that cotton, once spun and woven into shirting, would be entirely neutral to this sort of thing, inert.
Nope, still ert. Alias
Quote:
I still have to find a good shirtmaker where I live. They're not easy to come by.
Yes, easy. You send jet. I come.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
My shirtmaker has a famous client and had told me that this client orders 75 new shirts per season (twice a year). I somewhat did not really believe it, thinking that it was somewhat outrageous, but the last time I was there to pick up my order, I noticed that client order was also ready, I did not count them but it was definetely in the 75 range. Knowing the fabric used and what my guy charges, I'll say that on average the guy paid $500 a shirt. G.
Doesn't surprise me, I recall reading that Karl Lagerfeld purchases at least 200 H&K shirts every year. And that Hilfiger is a regular customer at Domenico Vacca: "Tommy Hilfiger's Hidden Taste Baggy sweatshirts may be good enough for America's youth, but when it comes to his own body, Tommy Hilfiger prefers a decidedly slimmer silhouette. The designer and his partner Lawrence Stroll hit the East Sixties boutique Borrelli last week and dropped a cool $150,000 on shirts before they were through. Owner Domenico Vacca personally escorted the pair around the store after closing while they chose fabrics for 250 shirts, which will be custom-tailored in Naples. Vacca tells us Hilfiger's taste ran "very Italian" -- he chose mostly Pietro-style collars in Egyptian and Sea Island cotton, which is the same style Harrison Ford picked when Borrelli outfitted him for his last two projects. Robert Redford is scheduled to be fitted for some threads of his own in February -- which, we hope, will leave plenty of fabric for the rest of us." http://newyorkmetro.com/nymetro....300 Jon.
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Yes, easy. You send jet. I come.  
I'll go and push a makeshift raft of rubber balloons and tires out into the Han River. With any luck, they'll end up somewhere close to your geography. That, or the coast of Siberia.
post #21 of 22
Quote:
this actually is a philosophy that I have enbraced years ago, and have raised on this forum (I really hope that it doens't become mainstream - I am sick of things I like becoming fashinable for a year or two and then afterwords leaving me looking like I am a hanger on). I would love to have a closet of only 5 "designers" - one each for socks, undrewear, shirts, suits and coats, and shoes. with some stuff like ties, hats and scarfs aside. I would love to have all of my shirts of identical cut (actually, now I have a "work' shirt and a "dress" shirt, with the difference being that the "dress" shirts have contrasting collars and cuffs). I would love to have all of my suits of the same cut, in similar color scheme, and to only have a small number (actually, here I also am down to 2 cuts). I would love to be down to 5 perfect ties (here I have a long way to go). and, my intention is to have stuff that will last my whole life, more or less, adn will only be replaced when it falls appart. this is a process that is still developing, but I have no doubt that it will take hold in the next few years, as I weed out some of my existing stuff.
In college I had about a dozen white oxford bd's and 4 pairs of chinos. a few coats a few suits and black-tie and tailcoat. These days, I have a bit more, but as for ties, I wear about 5-8 consistently. 1 solid blue, 1 solid black, 1 maroon, 1 club tie, 1 school tie, and one or two Brooks stripes. Maybe one dotted tie. (white on blue).
post #22 of 22
Quote:
The client who orders 60 shirts is not as rare as you might think. If you head a multi-national business, you may have three or four homes in which you regularly reside. If your travels take you for 1-2 weeks per home, 15 shirts per home would be about right. We often take orders for a certain number of shirts and are asked to make 3 or 4 of each. These are then packaged one per fabric into separate shipping cartons. Each carton is then sent to a different address.
Perhaps we should ask our favorite British steel magnate if this is true . . .
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › start of dropping out, downsizing, divesting