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Bourbon. - Page 59

post #871 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by ama View Post
Willet is interesting, they are finishing, or just finished their own distillery, but in the meantime they have been buying great barrels. How old is the one you got? Do you have any more information the Copper Pick Rye? Also, which BT Experimental did you get?

The Calypso was aged for 12 years in white oak, the label says distilled on March 26, 1996, it must have been floating around the warehouse of my Bourbon guy for a couple of extra years. It's 115.6 proof, non-chill filtered, really looking forward to cracking this open, but I've got a few other bottles that I've got to get to first.

It's Copper Fox Rye, not Copper Pick, sorry for the crappy photos. Distilled by the Copper Fox Distillery in Sperryville VA the makers of Wasmund's Single Malt Whisky. Mashbill is 2/3 rye and 1/3 hand malted barely, the same barley they use in the Wasmund's. Double pot stilled then aged 14 months in used bourbon barrels using the same applewood and oak chips that were used to malt the barley. This particular batch was aged using 60% applewood chips and 40% oak. Non-chill filtered but it's only 90 proof. I wasn't expecting much from it when I picked it up, but all the reviews I've read indicate that it is actually quite nice. We'll see, I'm thinking about opening it tonight. If its any good I'll probably take a day trip down to the distillery for a visit.

http://www.copperfox.biz/index/

As for the BT Experimental it's the 1993 Double Barreled.
http://www.greatbourbon.com/experimentalcollection.aspx
post #872 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Invicta View Post
Few new additions to the collection:





Look like some good picks, let me know how you like them.
post #873 of 2004
Ok as I have far too many bottles of whiskey laying around I'm going to start aggressively working my way through some of these and hopefully figure out best buys along the way.

Four Roses Small Batch


Nose: Light citrus and rye spice is immediately apparent followed by wood char and caramel. Lingering sweetness is the strongest impression.

Taste(neat): Spice is confirmed by an intense brief flash on the tongue, but quickly overpowered by charred oak and caramel. Oak char acts as a balancing agent, preventing the bourbon from becoming too sweet a la Makers Mark.

Taste (watered): After adding an eyedropper full of water, both oak char and caramel take a back seat to the spice, which is mellowed in intensity but extended in duration. Spice becomes the predominate flavor, pleasantly so.

Finish: Long and sweet, yet dry, likely due to the charred oak.

Final Impressions: This is definitely one of those bourbons that benefits from a little water. If you find most CA Cabernet Sauvingion over-oaked, you won't like this bourbon. I think it would make a mean Manhattan, sweet, without the cloying sweetness of Maker's. Not bad but probably will not buy again. Retails for ~$30.
post #874 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Invicta View Post
Nose: Light citrus and rye spice is immediately apparent followed by wood char and caramel. Lingering sweetness is the strongest impression.

Taste(neat): Spice is confirmed by an intense brief flash on the tongue, but quickly overpowered by charred oak and caramel. Oak char acts as a balancing agent, preventing the bourbon from becoming too sweet a la Makers Mark.

Taste (watered): After adding an eyedropper full of water, both oak char and caramel take a back seat to the spice, which is mellowed in intensity but extended in duration. Spice becomes the predominate flavor, pleasantly so.

Finish: Long and sweet, yet dry, likely due to the charred oak.

Final Impressions: This is definitely one of those bourbons that benefits from a little water. If you find most CA Cabernet Sauvingion over-oaked, you won't like this bourbon. I think it would make a mean Manhattan, sweet, without the cloying sweetness of Maker's. Not bad but probably will not buy again. Retails for ~$30.


Thanks for the review. This is one of those bourbons I am always thinking about trying, but just never do. I don't think I'll do so based on the above.
post #875 of 2004
Hi all,

So im fairly new to bourbon, but it's increasingly growing on me.

Anyways, while travelling I happened to pick up a bottle of 'The Macallan, 1824 Reserve Oak Edition' Single Malt Bourbon Whisky for about 50 USD. (hasn't been opened)

However, I have had macallan before but usually stick to Woodford Reserve or Knob Creek, but I have never heard of nor seen a bottle of this before?

Anyways my question is, any one here have any experience with this before or heard of it?

And also what you think of it.


Thanks
post #876 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto34 View Post
Hi all,

So im fairly new to bourbon, but it's increasingly growing on me.

Anyways, while travelling I happened to pick up a bottle of 'The Macallan, 1824 Reserve Oak Edition' Single Malt Bourbon Whisky for about 50 USD. (hasn't been opened)

However, I have had macallan before but usually stick to Woodford Reserve or Knob Creek, but I have never heard of nor seen a bottle of this before?

Anyways my question is, any one here have any experience with this before or heard of it?

And also what you think of it.


Thanks

You know, I have a couple of bottles of The Macallan - not this particular one you mention, but a couple of others around that price point - and my take on The Macallan is that they tend to produce a rather malty, peaty...you know, Scotch-y, type of whiskey, a sweet dusty dry tang that only comes from certain spots in the Scottish highlands or lowlands or gorse or heathers. They do make a fine single-malt, but I'd never before heard of them making a single-malt bourbon whiskey. in Scotland, no less. Stranger things have happened, though.
post #877 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post
You know, I have a couple of bottles of The Macallan - not this particular one you mention, but a couple of others around that price point - and my take on The Macallan is that they tend to produce a rather malty, peaty...you know, Scotch-y, type of whiskey, a sweet dusty dry tang that only comes from certain spots in the Scottish highlands or lowlands or gorse or heathers. They do make a fine single-malt, but I'd never before heard of them making a single-malt bourbon whiskey. in Scotland, no less. Stranger things have happened, though.

I don't think they do, I think Toronto is confused. As per their website, the 1824 collection contains a "Select Oak," a "Whisky Maker's Edition," and an "Estate Reserve" - no "Reserve Oak" and certainly no bourbons among them.
post #878 of 2004
Yeah, it was the "select oak", my mistake, was at work and couldn't quite remember.

Any ideas on the quality?
post #879 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto34 View Post
Yeah, it was the "select oak", my mistake, was at work and couldn't quite remember.

Any ideas on the quality?

Well I'd guess it's a pretty shitty bourbon. But as a scotch, it seems to have decent reviews online.
post #880 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto34 View Post
Yeah, it was the "select oak", my mistake, was at work and couldn't quite remember.

Any ideas on the quality?

Well, if you've alread bought it then I'd say it's a moot issue unless you're considering gifting it away.

If you've only drunk bourbon and have never before tried scotch, you might very well hate it. If you're familiar with scotch and like it, then I'd guess you've got a keeper on your hands. I don't remember ever hating a Macallan, but scotch and bourbon are different animals - you can like both, but it's by no means assured that liking one -> liking the other.

If you've never tried scotch and want to give it a shot, there are far, far worse places to start.
post #881 of 2004
Ok, corn-lovers, kindly rank for me: Noah's Rowan BMH (Limited) Michter's Eagle Rare Stagg Pappy (the youngest) Thanks. ~ H
post #882 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
Ok, corn-lovers, kindly rank for me:

Noah's
Rowan
BMH (Limited)
Michter's
Eagle Rare
Stagg
Pappy (the youngest)

Thanks.

~ H

Stagg
Pappy (the youngest) (assuming its the 15)
Rowan
Michter's (assuming its the 10)
Noah's
Eagle Rare
BMH (Limited)
post #883 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
Ok, corn-lovers, kindly rank for me:

Noah's
Rowan
BMH (Limited)
Michter's
Eagle Rare
Stagg
Pappy (the youngest)

Thanks.

~ H

Recognizing this is all about individual taste, for me, it is:

Pappy Van Winkle
Stagg
Noah's
Michter's
BMH
Eagle Rare
Rowan

If, on the other hand, the Eagle Rare you are referring to is the 17, I would place is after Stagg.
post #884 of 2004
Thanks, guys. IOW, Pappy and Stagg is where it is at. ~ H
post #885 of 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
Thanks, guys. IOW, Pappy and Stagg is where it is at. ~ H
I'll agree to that. Also, not on your list, but worth it if you can find it are William Larue Weller (wheater) and Thomas H. Handy (rye).
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