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Bourbon. - Page 5

post #61 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by mljones99 View Post
I always have Maker's Mark on hand for whiskey sours (my favorite drink) and then will have some Blantons to drink on the rocks.

God, I love Blanton's. I hand wrote the distiller a letter a few years ago to express my appreciation. He responded by sending me a pretty cool "Blanton's" embroidered button up and a standing invitation to come down whenever so he could give me a tour. I thought that was pretty neat.
post #62 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
Not trying to convert you, just spreading the love -- try Dalwhinnie sometimes.




Ah! I must buy -- it's the last of the Schaefferstown, PA whisky. Once it's gone, it's gone...

Better buy quick. I bought five bottles of the 20 year about 10 years ago for $120 each. The last time I found a bottle on Ebay it sold for $500. That's assuming you can find any.
post #63 of 2100
sorry for the crappy iPhone pic...picked up some Blanton's this afternoon on the way back from the office.

post #64 of 2100
I also agree with several of the other posters here that Maker's is terrible. The cool bottle IMO is the only reason it sells. I have two bottles up front on my bar (they were gifts) that are placed where they are so that HOPEFULLY someone else that is at my place drinks those up before they try to get into my good stuff.
post #65 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by KBW View Post
I also agree with several of the other posters here that Maker's is terrible. The cool bottle IMO is the only reason it sells. I have two bottles up front on my bar (they were gifts) that are placed where they are so that HOPEFULLY someone else that is at my place drinks those up before they try to get into my good stuff.

I like Maker's. It's not Blanton's, but it doesn't cost as much either.
post #66 of 2100
Gotta chime in. I love bourbon with a couple of ice cubes, especially during the summer.

My ranking:

1) Knob Creek (obviously)
2) Woodford Reserve
3) Basil Hayden
4) Jim Beam Black label, which is remarkably good for the price

Not a Maker's fan.
post #67 of 2100
I like Woodford and I buy bulliett (sp?) when I'm mixing it with something. Other than that I drink more of the high end single barrels more often than I drink the cheaper stuff. At work we drink Jim Beam black (I don't buy it).
post #68 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by borderline View Post
Not a Maker's fan.
+1. My ranking: 1) Woodford Reserve 2) Basil Hayden
post #69 of 2100
I'm drinking Evan Williams Single Barrel Vintage 1998 right now. I'd never had it before. Believe it or not, it's very good.
post #70 of 2100
i'm drinking evan williams too but this ain't no fancy single barrel crap
post #71 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman View Post
i'm drinking evan williams too but this ain't no fancy single barrel crap

I only paid $24.50 for the fancy single barrel. Not that expensive, but seriously good.
post #72 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
I only paid $24.50 for the fancy single barrel. Not that expensive, but seriously good.

Early night for a wedding, eh?
post #73 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Early night for a wedding, eh?

Yep.
post #74 of 2100
Knobb is def my go-to bourbon. It's so fucking ballsy and rough but at the same time the flavours are clear and easy to find. Woodford is good, but I find it a little too "soft" and cinnamon-y. Rip Van winkle is like drinking butterscotch; sweet enough to be desert. Evan Williams single barrel is a great drink and mostly a steal at its price. Old charter is my recent favorite, has an almost scotchy brine to it.
post #75 of 2100
Thread Starter 
Given the topic of this thread, my interview with Fred Noe seems relevant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeEpicurean.com
Appropriately enough, we begin our Bourbon Barons series with Frederick B. Noe III, seventh generation distiller of Jim Beam Brands Co. For many, Jim Beam was their introduction into the world of bourbon - from drinking it straight, to its mixibility in shots and cocktails. Many of us can recall in our young and formidable college years when Jim Beam served as a reliable standby to take our minds off the stresses of academia, and just the stresses of life in general. Simple, sweet, and palatable.

As we grow older and our tastes mature, Jim Beam Brands too grows with us offering a wide selection of bourbons. Going down their product line, the bourbon drinker can progress from Jim Beam, to Jim Beam Black, aged 8 years at 86 proof, to Jim Beam Choice, their only charcoal filtered Bourbon, to finally Jim Beam's Small Batch Collection, boasting four of the finest and most sophisticated Bourbons on the market. I, for one, can say that Booker's and Basil Hayden's, both part of Jim Beam's Small Batch Collection, are two of my absolute favorite Bourbons. If you are not yet privy, please, go out and do yourself the favor of partaking of either one of these fine, fine selections.

Currently at the reigns, and keeper of the family flame, sits Fred Noe, great grandson of the brand's namesake. He was instrumental in the creation of the Small Batch Collection in the 1990s, largely helping with promotion and selecting the batches ready for bottling. Since the retirement of his father, Booker Noe, Fred has taken over the much-venerated title Ambassador of The Small Batch Bourbon Collection. He has also gone on to become master distiller and, most recently in late 2007, was honored with the placement of his photo on the Jim Beam label alongside the six family distillers who have preceded him. With his exceptional knowledge and inheritated legacy, Fred continues to expand and reshape the brand, as well as Bourbon as a whole, into a well respected spirit the world wide.

Mr. Noe was kind enough to answer some questions we had sent him, as well as a few other well-respected Bourbon distillers, in hopes of better understanding these great men who produce great Bourbon:

CONTINUE READING FOR THE INTERVIEW
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