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Bourbon. - Page 8

post #106 of 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky7 View Post
Sorry to hear you are not a fan.

Normally I hate Will Ferrell and the air he breathes.

However, Stranger than Fiction showed a different side to teh Willster. A...talented side.

Haven't seen it since
post #107 of 2008
BTW - I may be knocking back a bit of bourbon this evening.
post #108 of 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Wayfarer View Post
I've been meaning to invest in a better Rye. Right now I'm working on a bottle of Old Overholt.

I like Old Overholt. Just okay, but it has its charm.
post #109 of 2008
In celebration of finals ending today I had an Elmer T Lee, A buffalo Trace, and and Eagle rare at the cigar bar. Yum, yum, yum.
post #110 of 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by life_interrupts View Post
How do y'all feel about Rye whiskey? They're making a comeback of late (the past two years). I've had Sazerac and the Jim Beam lately. Canadian Club is probably the best known one -- not a ringing endorsement.
Well, when people talk about whiskies being an acquired taste, they usually mean Scotch. I think of rye -- that is, an American rye. Canadian ryes are much more mellow, and commonly a little sweeter. American ryes can be very peppery, spicy, and almost astringent. Old Portero is an excellent example, and my favorite rye, though it is quite hard to find. Rittenhouse 23 is probably the best out there (but it is very dear!). Wild Turkey rye is an excellent value for money, and is my 'everyday' cocktail grade of rye. For Canadian rye, you should probably listen to Piobaire. It's a classic spirit and deserves space on any bar shelf. It also can makes some excellent cocktails, such as the original Manhattan. ~ Huntsman
post #111 of 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by life_interrupts View Post
How do y'all feel about Rye whiskey? They're making a comeback of late (the past two years). I've had Sazerac and the Jim Beam lately. Canadian Club is probably the best known one -- not a ringing endorsement.

One thing to keep in mind is that people mean two different things when talking about rye. First there are American "straight rye" whiskies. In order to be called a straight rye, the whiskey must follow all the same requirements as bourbon, with the only difference being that the mashbill must be > 51% rye, as opposed to > 51% corn for bourbon. It must still be aged in charred new barrels for at least 2 years, and be distilled at not greater than 160 proof (and barreled at not more than 125 proof).

When referring to Canadian whiskey, people also call it rye. It used to be a straight rye similar to the American variation, although it was never required to be aged in new, charred barrels. It has now, for the most part, become a very bland, tasteless whiskey, in no small part due to the fact that it is now a 'blended' whiskey similar to blended scotch; a very small amount of real 'rye' spirit is blended in with a more neutral grain spirit. This causes a very mild, and IMHO a rather bland and boring spirit. While there are a decent Canadian whiskies, I haven't found very many that I want to drink on a regular basis.

Not sure if it's been mentioned, but Wild Turkey Rye is actually a very fine example of a traditional American Straight Rye. Sazerac 6 year old from Buffalo Trace is also pretty good, while the 18 year old version of Sazerac (part of Buffalo Trace's Antique Collection) is outstanding.

Cheers!
post #112 of 2008
So, I have had my fair share of Elijah Craig over the past week. I found it to be extremely smooth compared to knob creek, eagle rare, and woodford reserve and is probably my new favorite bourbon.
post #113 of 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post
So, I have had my fair share of Elijah Craig over the past week. I found it to be extremely smooth compared to knob creek, eagle rare, and woodford reserve and is probably my new favorite bourbon.

hmm might try that next
post #114 of 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post
So, I have had my fair share of Elijah Craig over the past week. I found it to be extremely smooth compared to knob creek, eagle rare, and woodford reserve and is probably my new favorite bourbon.

Elijah Craig 12 yr is impossible to beat for the money. I can get a bottle for $15 here, and I would pick it over many bourbons that cost twice that amount, and over scotches that cost upwards of 5x that amount. It's an outstanding product at an amazing price point.

That said, I'm not always in the mood for it, and I drink many other bourbons and scotches as well; but as a 'go-to' bottle, it fits all the classic requirements, both in quality and price.
post #115 of 2008
I don't want to hijack the thread, but American Straight Rye Whiskey is my favorite drink. Nothing I've tasted (albiet a limited experience) has even come close to the Rittenhouse 23. Black Maple Hill 23 is close, but not the same. Rye runs the whole gamut from terribly undrinkable to some of the best and most complex tastes I have experienced. I've talked myself into buying up 4-5 bottles of BMH 23 and Rittenhouse 23 before the prices get any worse.
post #116 of 2008
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_5 View Post
So, I have had my fair share of Elijah Craig over the past week. I found it to be extremely smooth compared to knob creek, eagle rare, and woodford reserve and is probably my new favorite bourbon.

12 or 18 year?
post #117 of 2008
I'm no expert on the subject (gin is my preferred booze), but I've recently taken quite a liking to Jim Beam black label. For it's price, it does deliver. <3 EDIT: the availabilty of premium bourbons is absolutely atrocious here.
post #118 of 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Wayfarer View Post
12 or 18 year?

12 year
post #119 of 2008
I picked up the Jim Beam Black label 8 year last night. Pretty decent for $18 (on sale). Well worth the $3 extra from normal Jim beam
post #120 of 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by IUtoSLU View Post
I don't want to hijack the thread, but American Straight Rye Whiskey is my favorite drink.
Interesting! I really want to taste the Rittenhouse now.
Quote:
Nothing I've tasted (albiet a limited experience) has even come close to the Rittenhouse 23. Black Maple Hill 23 is close, but not the same. Rye runs the whole gamut from terribly undrinkable to some of the best and most complex tastes I have experienced. I've talked myself into buying up 4-5 bottles of BMH 23 and Rittenhouse 23 before the prices get any worse.
Whoa, that's some serious smack right there! ~ H
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