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How does one work 50+ hours a week? - Page 3

post #31 of 387
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyliu52 View Post
seriously did you go through all that college just to realize you don't wanna be an accountant?

No, visiting the CPA firm made me not want to be an accountant . I need to intern somewhere before I totally write it off.
post #32 of 387
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpmac7 View Post
Thats sums it up right there, if you actually want to get somewhere with your life then you will work your tail off, if you dont and you want a bunch of free time then go work at McDonalds and live pay check to pay check.

You don't suppose there's a middle ground? Making comfortable money, with comfortable hours?
post #33 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post
Fuck that ignorant B.S.

Unions: The Folks That Brought You The Weekend.

War Unions!!

Ah yes - the union. Protecting the meek and uneducated since its inception.
post #34 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by longskate88 View Post
In for the list of interesting and rewarding jobs

I enjoy clothes, watches, and furniture..cars and big houses hold no interest for me. I think my 3 vices can be obtained on less than a CEO's salary.

Who knows though, I may end up liking the CPA work, stranger things have happened.

lol - on a forum where members consistently post about $2k shoes, $5k suits, and $10k watches - I'd say you'd need MORE than an average CEO's salary.
post #35 of 387
The only person I know with zero complaints about their job is a fly fishing guide in Montana. He makes enough to get by, but goddamn the work is good. This guy actually changed my very successful CEO father's conception of work and earning, which is incredible to me. Floating the Stillwater a few days a week or putting in tons of hours in an office making someone else a fortune?
post #36 of 387
50 hours a week doesnt seem bad at all. I would love to work with different clients and have as much human interaction as possible. However, I can't imagine populating excel spread sheets or writing up reports all day.
post #37 of 387
Accounting (and even audit) can be highly conceptual and very interesting. You do need the mindset for it though.
post #38 of 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by longskate88 View Post
You don't suppose there's a middle ground? Making comfortable money, with comfortable hours?
Seems like most of these positions become available after you put in your 5-10 years... Also, I'm pretty sure the definitions of comfortable money probably vary pretty widely on this forum. For some it might be $50k, for others it is probably $500k.
post #39 of 387
As someone who works in a large CPA firm in the audit department and regularly works more than 50 hours a week, it's pretty simple. Right now I usually work from 9-6 with a real quick lunch. Then work a few hours from home usually 9-12 or 10-12 at night. Adds up pretty quickly. That gives me enough time to eat dinner, workout, and relax.

The work isn't interesting until you make senior. Once you make senior usually in 2-3 years, the grunt work grind decreases dramatically. You just assign that stuff to your staff and worry about the larger issues which is more interesting but 10x more stressful.
post #40 of 387
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelF View Post
Accounting (and even audit) can be highly conceptual and very interesting. You do need the mindset for it though.


Thanks Joel. Can you describe the mindset of someone who might enjoy accounting? I've heard the "you must like numbers" line enough, which is like saying "you must like the color blue" as if that somehow qualifies you to work in a sweatshop making blue t-shirts all day, LOL.
post #41 of 387
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasmade View Post
As someone who works in a large CPA firm in the audit department and regularly works more than 50 hours a week, it's pretty simple. Right now I usually work from 9-6 with a real quick lunch. Then work a few hours from home usually 9-12 or 10-12 at night. Adds up pretty quickly. That gives me enough time to eat dinner, workout, and relax.

The work isn't interesting until you make senior. Once you make senior usually in 2-3 years, the grunt work grind decreases dramatically. You just assign that stuff to your staff and worry about the larger issues which is more interesting but 10x more stressful.

Thanks!

1)Do you enjoy the work you're doing, apparently 'til midnight?

2)How's the pay?

3) Once you make senior, do the hours reduce? What position are you in, and how long have you been in the field?

It's nice to get some real input. Also, say you got burnt out one day, are there positions available that you could work fewer hours, but still make enough $ to live on?
post #42 of 387
Thread Starter 
Doing the math at ~56 hours a week, I guess that still gives you 1/3 of your time as "free time." 8 hours a day for work (that's 7 days a week, of course it's distributed unevenly) and 8 hours a day for sleep, you've still got 8 hours left a day. I guess it could be worse?
post #43 of 387
It doesn't apply to an accountant or assebly line worker, but at some point in your progess up the ladder, the distinction between what's work and not begins to blur. I say I work 60-70 hours per week, but that includes long business lunches, a few hours on the golf course with clients, business trips combined with vacation, etc. For me, the key to professional success has been not counting hours and not trying to isolate work from the rest of my life. Even when I'm not at the office, I spend time with friends and associates discussing the same topics.
post #44 of 387
I don't know what it's like in the accounting world, but still, what the hell is going on in this thread? You can't be successful without working more than 50 hours a week? I guess if you don't consider yourself a success until you are driving a Benz, then yeah. But what about those people whose idea of success is maximizing the amount of time they get to spend with their families while still providing a decent living for them? "Only it takes time to be happy. A lot of time. Happiness, too, is a long patience. And in almost every case, we use up our lives making money, when we should be using our money to gain time." - Camus
post #45 of 387
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taxler View Post
It doesn't apply to an accountant or assebly line worker, but at some point in your progess up the ladder, the distinction between what's work and not begins to blur. I say I work 60-70 hours per week, but that includes long business lunches, a few hours on the golf course with clients, business trips combined with vacation, etc. For me, the key to professional success has been not counting hours and not trying to isolate work from the rest of my life. Even when I'm not at the office, I spend time with friends and associates discussing the same topics.

And what do you do for a living?
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