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Veuve Cliquot

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Real quick, I have heard two different pronunciations: "Vove Click-o" and "Vee-vay Cleeck-o".
post #2 of 12
There is not sound in French approaching the "eu" of veuve, but the closest might be the o of of when pronounced "ov", if that makes sense. The final e of veuve is silent. Second word: click is not bad. And the o sound is one sound, not diphtongated. It is a deep o, not an open o. Like when you say: Ohhh.
post #3 of 12
Of course, if you are from the south of France, you do pronounce the final e of veuve.
post #4 of 12
Quote:
There is not sound in French approaching the "eu" of veuve, but the closest might be the o of of when pronounced "ov", if that makes sense.  The final e of veuve is silent.   Second word: click is not bad.  And the o sound is one sound, not diphtongated.  It is a deep o, not an open o.  Like when you say: Ohhh.
Ummm... "eux" = them in French, so there is a very basic sound for "eu" in french. Veuve cliquot is pronounced "vuh-ve cli-co"
post #5 of 12
[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne,27 Dec. 2004, 07:50
There is not sound in French approaching the "eu" of veuve, but the closest might be the o of of when pronounced "ov", if that makes sense.  The final e of veuve is silent.   Second word: click is not bad.  And the o sound is one sound, not diphtongated.  It is a deep o, not an open o.  Like when you say: Ohhh.
Ummm... "eux" = them in French, so there is a very basic sound for "eu" in french. Veuve cliquot is pronounced "vuh-ve cli-co"[/quote from above message from PHV ] Ooops, I meant, of course: there is no equivalent of that French eu sound in English.   Eux in French is a different eu from the one in veuve.  The lips are open when pronouncing veuve, more closed and rounded when pronouncing eux. I would discourage the pronouncing of the final e of veuve. It should end in a "v" sound.  Unless, again, you want to sound like you are from Marseille or Toulouse.
post #6 of 12
And for those who are interested, veuve means widow.  The name is actually spelled Clicquot.   Philippe Clicquot founded a wine trading business in Reims in the XVIII century, died prematurely, so his widow, Barbe Nicole Ponsardin became the owner.  Under her management, the "Maison" became famous.  For over 60 years, she remained the main decision maker. This institution now belongs to LVMH (Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy) and is still one of the biggest producers of great champagnes (grands champagnes).
post #7 of 12
Also, because of its proximity to a k sound, the second v is pronounced like an f. Think "veu-fklee-koh."
post #8 of 12
I am pretty confident you pronounce it like this: Vooove Cleek-ot
post #9 of 12
Quote:
I am pretty confident you pronounce it like this: Vooove Cleek-ot
ooo is not the right sound. It isn't the same sound as "vous".
post #10 of 12
Listen to Alain or Juliette say "veuve clicquot" (or anything for that matter) at the following site: http://www.research.att.com/projects/tts/demo.html
post #11 of 12
Quote:
I am pretty confident you pronounce it like this: Vooove Cleek-ot
Why are you wasting your time debating French pronunciation with a native French speaker?
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by csfbguy,30 Dec. 2004, 08:12
I am pretty confident you pronounce it like this: Vooove Cleek-ot
Why are you wasting your time debating French pronunciation with a native French speaker?
That's what I don't understand. Americans always have a very funny pronunciation of French words, then again so do I compared to a french first language person, but compared to most I only sound like half an idiot.
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