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Is anyone else snowed in today?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Since a good part of North America got a big dump of snow, is there anyone else who's also snowed in and has nothing better to do but drink beer, eat chocolates, poke at Christmas gifts, and stare at the computer?
post #2 of 11
Not alot of snow here but it was -15 when i woke up this morning. I really got to get out of this state.
post #3 of 11
lt never snows where l live. What do all you guys do if your snowed in, how do you go to work? Doesn't a company miss all their employees when they are snowed in at home? How do you start your car in such freezing temperitures? How do you survive such cold temperitures? Tell me more about this. Does someone come and dig you out when you are snowed in? How long can you be snowed in for.
post #4 of 11
I was snowed in for a few hours last Wednesday night and Thursday morning, but risked a ticket driving to the airport on Thursday (we were under a "level 3 snow emergency"--no travel allowed). They put me on a plane to Cincinnati--where everything was completely SNAFU. Eventually got to LAX at 3 in the morning, instead of Orange County (scheduled arrival at 11 the PREVIOUS day). Return trip was uneventful, but there are still lots of people whose bags are sitting in airports around the midwest. Good luck on getting them back anytime soon. To answer Marc's questions (based on living in North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Maine for 30 of my 44 years): 1. If your boss requires your presence, you shovel out the driveway and do your best to get there. If you can't, you call in. Most of the time you can get there (even without an SUV). 2. If you have a garage, starting a car isn't really a problem. If you're outside, cars will start pretty easily down to zero. If it's routinely colder than that, you can have an engine-block heater attached to the engine that has an electric plug-in. In northern climates, this is standard with the car. And many apartment complexes, and even hotels, provide electrical outlets in the parking lots--just carry an extension cord. 3. You stay inside as much as possible. Houses tend to be pretty well insulated; you may burn more fuel oil/gas/electricity, and it may feel drafty, but you put on another sweater/sports coat/smoking jacket. If you do have to go out, you have to have cold weather gear. A good parka, gloves, a warm hat, boots, etc. 4. The someone who digs you out is generally yourself. I do live in a private community with a homeowners association that boasts you never have to shovel, because they handle all snowfalls of more than 2 inches. Well they plowed my driveway the other day, but they left a 2-inch layer on the driveway. So later today my job is to go out and clean it off. If I don't, it will turn into compacted ice which will make the slight slope of the driveway impassable. People are always recommending hiring neighborhood kids to shovel snow. After living in several "family" neighborhoods in the past 15 years, I can say without equivocation that kids don't shovel snow. Not for their parents. Not for their neighbors. Not for money. They're too busy playing gameboy. 5. It's possible to be snowed in for several days, but in recent times, the longest I've been unable to move is about a day and a half. Now I'm asking myself why I continue to put up with this. Well, here in Ohio it's generally milder than the other places I've lived, and winter is really only 2 months long (most years). Plus the job is good. I would like to relocate, but I need to put in a couple of years in my new position before I look again.
post #5 of 11
Johnw86: that is completely enlightening to me. l had no idea things were like that. WOW. Do you raelly risk fines for driving in icey weather?
post #6 of 11
Marc, yes, there is a fine for driving during a level 3 snow emergency (I read in the paper this morning that the maximum penalty is a $350 fine and 30 days in jail.). Last week, I heard they were pulling people over on a major state highway and giving out tickets, but in today's paper, the county sheriff said they didn't ticket anyone. The county I live in had the level 3 alert; the county 2 miles away (where the airport is located) was under a level 2 alert (only necessary travel). I figured if I could get to the other county, I could justify the trip as necessary to get out of here.
post #7 of 11
John, I was interested in your comment that neighborhood kids don't shovel for money. Are their allowances all too high?. Don't they want a new bike for the upcoming springtime? I ask because I grew up shoveling snow for money in my neighborhood (at the time (early 1980s, Georgetown, Washington, DC) -- I could easily make $100+ in several hours of shoveling.
post #8 of 11
In reality, I'm not sure why they don't shovel (mow lawns, etc.) as we did when we were kids. I think some of the younger kids (10-12) might be interested in doing it, but the parents think they're too young; the older ones (13-15) see it as "work" to be avoided; and the oldest teens (16-18) think it would be uncool if their friends saw them. I live in a fairly upscale community; most of the teens have their own cars (nothing particularly fancy) purchased by their parents. I suspect the allowance is large enough to cover gas and other expenses--so the concept of earning money isn't something they have to be familiar with. In some cases, I know parents actively discourage them from having jobs (even odd jobs)--they want them to remain children as long as possible (in itself a disheartening event--and sure to produce disastrous results).
post #9 of 11
Quote:
In reality, I'm not sure why they don't shovel (mow lawns, etc.) as we did when we were kids.  I think some of the younger kids (10-12) might be interested in doing it, but the parents think they're too young; the older ones (13-15) see it as "work" to be avoided; and the oldest teens (16-18) think it would be uncool if their friends saw them. I live in a fairly upscale community; most of the teens have their own cars (nothing particularly fancy) purchased by their parents.  I suspect the allowance is large enough to cover gas and other expenses--so the concept of earning money isn't something they have to be familiar with.   In some cases, I know parents actively discourage them from having jobs (even odd jobs)--they want them to remain children as long as possible (in itself a disheartening event--and sure to produce disastrous results).
If I could find a shovel small enough for my kid, believe me he'd be out there shoveling, and as soon as he is older he will be doing odd jobs in the nieghborhood. i grew up doing odd jobs and my kids will too, or they will get used to not having any money in their pockets.
post #10 of 11
I shoveled snow. Lots of it. Usually alongside the other slave-er-siblings. You mean some people were actually paid? However, when my dad was in town, he was right there beside us...
post #11 of 11
Quote:
I shoveled snow. Lots of it. Usually alongside the other slave-er-siblings. You mean some people were actually paid? However, when my dad was in town, he was right there beside us...
you probrably thought you had gotten away from snow, didn't you? looks like it caught up with you, even in texas.
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