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Spectator question

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Black and off-white spectators - lace-up. Other than a seersucker suit, what would make a good match? Thanks.
post #2 of 10
You can get some ideas from Astaire. By the way, Michel Perry had designed a new pair of Spectator shoe, available also in a balmoral model. It's in tan and dark brown.
post #3 of 10
I'm not familiar with the term seersucker, but how about a nice thick chalkstripe?
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
You can get some ideas from Astaire.
Thank you. If I only had 1% of his inate sense of style or his ability to move.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I'm not familiar with the term seersucker, but how about a nice thick chalkstripe?
A light thin fabric, generally cotton or rayon, with a crinkled surface and a usually striped pattern. see http://cgi.ebay.com/ws....me=WDVW
post #6 of 10
Quote:
I'm not familiar with the term seersucker...
Oh, dear. (Sorry for the J.A. Banks image. Only one I could find quickly.) Bruce Boyer writes about the seersucker suit:
Quote:
American seersucker is a cotton version of the silk seersucker worn in the nineteenth century by the British in India. The word itself seems to be a Hindi corruption of a Persian phrase, shir shakkar, which translates as "milk and sugar." This etymology refers to the alternating smooth and rough textures of the stripes, the distinctive feature of the cloth, which is achieved by what is called slack-tension weaving: alternating fibers are held under normal tension, while intervening ones are kept slack to create a pattern of puckered and flat stripes. Seersucker's most distinguishing characteristic is its greatest stylistic virtue as well: it flaunts its rumpled state with aplomb. It became popular as the perfect cloth for hot, humid climes. In the South, men began to wear seersucker suits in the summer around the turn of the century as a more comfortable alternative to flannel and linen, but they were considered a rather cheap approach to dressing and had little fashion allure until university men began wearing them after the First World War. They were seen at tony country clubs in the '30s and '40s but didn't really catch on with businessmen in the North until the end of the Second World War...
I very badly want a J Press seersucker suit. In answer to your question, how about linen or poplin? The more often you wear Spectators the better.
post #7 of 10
Thanks for the explanation
post #8 of 10
Quote:
I'm not familiar with the term seersucker, but how about a nice thick chalkstripe?
For a real life view, albeit with polyester mixed in, saunter into Steppin' Out during the spring/summer. If you dare... . They tend to have seersucker trousers in white/blue and white/pink. On occasion also jackets in the same colours. MtB
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Quote:
(Roy @ 23 Dec. 2004, 07:22) I'm not familiar with the term seersucker, but how about a nice thick chalkstripe?
For a real life view, albeit with polyester mixed in, saunter into Steppin' Out in the spring summer. If you dare... . They tend to have seersucker trousers in white/blue and white/pink. On occasion also jackets in the same colours. MtB
Hmmm, If I want to create a nice 'Corpsballen' look I will definitely keep this in mind
post #10 of 10
Linen would be great with your spectators.
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