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Beretta sale in nyc

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
don't they do leather goods? if not i don't know what they do: june 2-4 9-630 560 Seventh Ave.
post #2 of 16
I believe they also produce sporting type clothing in the manner of Barbour.
post #3 of 16
Don't they make a nice 9mm semi-automatic? ....in Texas that does qualify as a fashion accesory.
post #4 of 16
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Don't they make a nice 9mm semi-automatic? ....in Texas that does qualify as a fashion accesory.
Also some damn fine shotguns...
post #5 of 16
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Also some damn fine shotguns...
Seemingly though Beretta is known mostly for their handguns. Purdey, and Holland & Holland creates a mean shotgun/rifle.
post #6 of 16
Check these out: http://www.berettausa.com/product/pr..._guns_main.htm I wouldn't mind having one... Does anybody else here shoot clays? It's lots of fun.
post #7 of 16
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Also some damn fine shotguns...
Seemingly though Beretta is known mostly for their handguns. Purdey, and Holland & Holland creates a mean shotgun/rifle.
Don't you watch The Sopranos? I'm no gun expert, but the Beretta 20 gauge over-under that I shot was the most beautiful and best shotgun I've ever seen. I've no doubt that the big-name British makers have a much better product, but Beretta makes some wonderful guns.
post #8 of 16
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Does anybody else here shoot clays? It's lots of fun.
Sporting clays, skeet, or trap? I shoot at skeet, but I can't say that I'm very successful. If you're any good at sporting clays, you have my unabashed respect. I'm thinking of getting a shotgun (12 gauge over-under, probably Baikal -- nothing special, but I'm not good enough to justify anything better) so that I can stop bumming off of my friend and his father-in-law.
post #9 of 16
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I shoot at skeet, but I can't say that I'm very successful.
It's a lot harder than it looks, isn't it. Nothing so formal - I go out with friends, we take turns throwing and shooting. Although these guys can be pretty tricky - If I'm shooting well they will do everything in their power to mess up my groove. I'd love to try sporting clays someday.   I'm still using my trusty Remington 870, but I too am looking to get a decent over-under. Done much research on what's a good deal??
post #10 of 16
Oh, and another thing - are you sure you want the 12 gauge? I'm going to go with a 20 gauge for my next gun. So I can shoot all afternoon and then wake up the next day without feeling like I've been beat up.
post #11 of 16
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I'm still using my trusty Remington 870, but I too am looking to get a decent over-under. Done much research on what's a good deal??
I've shot a grand total of three different kinds of shotguns: a Beretta Silverwing 12 gauge, a Beretta Silverwing 20 gauge, and a Baikal IZH27 12 gauge. The first two retail for north of $1200, I think, while the Baikal (AKA The Russian) retails for around $500. The Berettas are obviously better guns -- prettier and better-made -- and the Baikal is a bit stiff, but everyone I talk to who actually knows about guns tells me that it's by far the best over/under for the money. When I decide that I just have to have one, I'll probably be able to get it near wholesale from my friend's father-in-law's buddy, who's a gun dealer.
post #12 of 16
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Oh, and another thing - are you sure you want the 12 gauge? I'm going to go with a 20 gauge for my next gun. So I can shoot all afternoon and then wake up the next day without feeling like I've been beat up.
That's a valid point, but I'm more likely to hit something with a 12 gauge than a 20 gauge. I can live with a bruised shoulder if I can break more birds.
post #13 of 16
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Oh, and another thing - are you sure you want the 12 gauge? I'm going to go with a 20 gauge for my next gun. So I can shoot all afternoon and then wake up the next day without feeling like I've been beat up.
That's a valid point, but I'm more likely to hit something with a 12 gauge than a 20 gauge. I can live with a bruised shoulder if I can break more birds.
You'd be better off w/a 20 guage for the sport shooting you're talking about. 12's and 10's are usually reserved for duck and geese hunting because they can kill at a higher altitude. At the same distance, there isn't much difference between a 20's and 12's shot spread. With a heavier shotgun, you'll also lose a lot of the agility and quickness needed to shoot chuckers/pheasant/hens. I still use what amounts to be a beginner's Smith and Wesson over & under that my old man bought for me at a gun show 11 years ago, and I can still kill anything in the air with it. Gun shows are definitely the outlet malls of the firearm community. Check them out first.
post #14 of 16
My dad-in-law to be is a lifelong quail hunter and never misses on skeet.... I pretty much suck at it but I'm persistent - if I miss I'll run after the damned thing and beat it with a club til it breaks. ...daughter is 8 now so I guess it's time to practice. Jcusey - somehow I'm picturing you driving a Lexus or a jag with a shotgun rack in the back window. Gotta love Texas, where else can you have a loaded gun and an open beverage container in the car with you simultaneously?
post #15 of 16
As a previous poster mentioned, the spread may not be that different, to a point. I think the issue may be less what you are able to hit than what you are able to drop dead. I'm by no means a ballistics expert, but, if I remember correctly, Michael McIntosh wrote an article in Field & Stream arguing that 12's may actually be more sporting than 20's, 28's, and, especially, 410's because you kill more and wound less. As far as kick, I don't notice a significant difference between a 12 and a 20. Weight is another issue. If I'm dead wrong (pun intended) about this, please let me know. This is interesting to me.
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