or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Do you wear perfume?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Do you wear perfume? - Page 2

post #16 of 30
It seems a lot of places of work have become "fragrance free". I suppose it's to prevent liability for allergic reactions etc. in other people. It is for this reason that I don't wear fragrances during the day.
post #17 of 30
Quote:
I wasn't sure which category to place this in, but since for me, it completes an outfit, here I am in Men's Clothing.  Warning: please spare me the BO jokes.  it gets old.  Very fast.  My serious question is the following: Do you wear perfume?  If not, why?  If so, can you talk about how it is viewed where you live?
Never. Why : - I do not like to smell perfume - It is expensive - It makes too much if you are well dressed and tacky if you are in jeans and sweater
post #18 of 30
I think that scent is slowly going out of style, especially for men. I wear it once in a blue moon for a special occasion.
post #19 of 30
I wear creed himalian, which I use very sparingly. everything else is unscented, and the plan is to use the same scent from now on, for good.
post #20 of 30
I apply a small bit of fragrance most mornings (and some evenings). Just a few dabs on each wrist, which I enjoy catching a whiff of occasionally throughout the day. I have spent the past couple of years sampling fragrances, narrowing down from many hundreds about 20 or so, and from those 20, less than a dozen that I keep in more or less constant rotation. Among these (some of which crossover w/ drizz): Villoresi Vetiver Villoresi Spezie MPG Santal Noble L'Artisan L'eau du Navigateur (no longer available in US) L'Artisan Dzing. Serge Lutens Fumerie Turque (Paris only)
post #21 of 30
Quote:
I think the majority of stylish men use scent and you probably do not realize it simply because they do so quite sparingly.
I agree.
post #22 of 30
Fragrances can last quite awhile depending on the quality. Mass market stuff at EDC/EDT strength may only last 3-5 years, millesimes by Creed can last many decades. If you visit Creed's boutique in Paris, they have some vintage Creeds from the 19th century that are still quite nice. Fragrances, like wines, last longer if stored in the dark and in cool temperatures. All of my stuff is more or less 1-2 years old or newer as I keep rotating fragrances in and out of my collection and sell quite a few as well (on ebay and in other places)
post #23 of 30
I am a firm believer in the daily application of cologne...except for those rare occasions when I go hunting and don't want to spook the game. Among the many movements of crusading cranks and obnoxious activists, there are few if any that I despise more absolutely than the "anti-fragrance" movement. If some people are allergic, tough stuff. No few people are allergic to the sun, pollens and whatnot. Should we try to snuff the sun or eradicate flowering plants for their benefit?
post #24 of 30
i use perfume/cologne/fragrances regularly.  i am one for moderation - a dab on the wrists or the neck is enough.  the idea is not to knock out everybody who passes by. also, i dont like cologne on clothes - it's meant to be applied to the skin. on clothes, it will get stale quickly and the stale smell will remain forever.
post #25 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Fragrances can last quite awhile depending on the quality.  Mass market stuff at EDC/EDT strength may only last 3-5 years, millesimes by Creed can last many decades.  If you visit Creed's boutique in Paris, they have some vintage Creeds from the 19th century that are still quite nice.  Fragrances, like wines, last longer if stored in the dark and in cool temperatures.  All of my stuff is more or less 1-2 years old or newer as I keep rotating fragrances in and out of my collection and sell quite a few as well (on ebay and in other places)
Given that you mentionned having several hundreds of fragrances, and that there are only 350 days in a year, I was just a little worried for your collection. I spent a few days in Grasse, and yes, I have smelled perfumes that were several decades old with still quite a kick. However, some years ago, I found a forgotten bottle of Magie Noire in a drawer. I would estimate it was 15-20 years old. It was no longer wearable. So what do you think of this trend in Paris that has people designing their own perfume? Strikes me as Disneyland-y. But then again, when you smell some of the "creations" on the market, it makes you ponder.
post #26 of 30
for some, designing one's own perfume is a natural extension of a trend of moving to bespoke/customization in everything personal to ourselves...suits, shirts, hats, shoes: the desire to have our personal items special-made and personally designed by ourselves; to abandon mass commercialism and develop a personal, unique style through custom made.... but learning to make an individual fragrance , or at least direct the nose to do so, would be daunting and require a whole new field of study, even though it would be a very interesting endeavour. so the best that i could do would be to seek out the unusual, though commercial, perfumes. I haven't been able to find the serge lutens line yet , for example.....
post #27 of 30
If I was going to do so, I'd definitely go to Villoresi in Florence, I believe it costs about E600 for him to custom make a fragrance for you, pretty cool IMO (and only about E500 more than buying one of his off the shelf fragrances)
post #28 of 30
Thread Starter 
What does that mean: "custom-make a fragrance for you"? Does that mean you have input? Does it mean he reads your personality, then creates? I don't think I would trust anyone to custom create a perfume for me, unless that person knew me. Et encore. Now, if the process involved some kind of learning process in the art of marrying scents, maybe. But only for the sake of the illusion.
post #29 of 30
Here is an outline of the process. Lorenzo Villoresi is one of the most respected perfumers in the world. http://www.basenotes.net/articles/lorenzo.html
post #30 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Here is an outline of the process.  Lorenzo Villoresi is one of the most respected perfumers in the world. http://www.basenotes.net/articles/lorenzo.html
Thank you for the article. That is the most logical and practical manner of handling the whole thing, indeed. I'd still be too scared.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Do you wear perfume?