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Is there a difference between style & well-dressed - Page 2

post #16 of 39
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Am I making sense here?  I guess my end conclusion is that you can dress stylishly in a conservative office setting only if (1) you are in a position of power, or (2) you only do it a certain percentage of the time, like 25%.
another option - you are not in a "line" position - you are in business intellegence, or IT, or the office manager.
post #17 of 39
eric and acole, very good anwers (not that everybody else isn't special in their own way, mond you, but I liked their answers)
post #18 of 39
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I dont get why people are so concerned with how they are viewed in their offices with respect to their clothing.  I get the sense most people walk around on eggshells because they dont want to offend the boss, offend the coworkers, offend the clients.  It seems a bit silly to me.  We arent in 3rd grade anymore.   Well, maybe Ernest is, but thats a different subject.  
Sorry, but I never took care of what was wearing my boss.   One was sticking rubber soles on his Church's. I didn't do the same. I told him it was silly to do that. He should stop.
post #19 of 39
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dark brown Grenson captoes, I am "dressing well"
How can one be dressed well with brown shoes in a city?
post #20 of 39
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 Its like we all want to make sure we are wearing the same crap so no one feels separated from the group. As grown men, we should all be entitled to dress in whatever manner we choose at work (within reason ofcourse) - if the dress code is suit/tie, by all means wear suit and tie.   Part of what makes dressing well and being stylish fun is having both the balls to wear what you want, and knowing you look damn good doing it.  
Hear hear. (OK, I'm a woman, but still.) I surprise people at work. I don't dress like everyone else, all of the time. It hasn't hurt my career yet. In fact, I could argue for the contrary. I wish men in the company were bolder. So I could at least have the pleasure of telling my husband about interesting choices. But no. It is black suits, white shirts, boring ties, pants that are too short. I could go on, but it is too depressing.
post #21 of 39
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(OK, I'm a woman, but still.)
I'm asking myself : 1) " why does a woman want to talk about men's clothes on a forum" ? 2) " How did she arrived here " ?
post #22 of 39
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(Phil @ 22 Dec. 2004, 2:26) I dont get why people are so concerned with how they are viewed in their offices with respect to their clothing.  I get the sense most people walk around on eggshells because they dont want to offend the boss, offend the coworkers, offend the clients.  It seems a bit silly to me.
I agree with you to a certain extent, but I think at least in the legal field (and from my perspective) what people think IS important- it is very much a part of your business and your profession.  You sound like you dress quite conservatively, so I imagine it's rarely of any issue to you anyways in your business.
it is pretty simple - you need to decide if you are comfortable doing business with somebody you don't know. "doing business" might be buying a paaper from him, or it might mean letting him plan your families estate. if you are buying a paper, the trust doesn't have to be that great. if it is something very high in importance, you are going to want to understand a little bit about him, and if you can trust him. you don't have that much info, so how he dresses gives you hints. in theory, anyway. so, to a large extent, people are dressing to fit the stereotype of what their potential business partners or mates might be looking for. and think about it, if you are talking to a banker about your mortgage, and he is wearing a hell's angels jacket and fishnet stockings, you would be totally freaked out. that is an exageration of the normal situation - people are looking for subtle clues like ties, shoes, cut of suit, to understand if they can really trust people that they don't know very well.
post #23 of 39
I agree with that assesment Globetrotter. I think you are right, people look for subtle clues when assessing someone, from business to the dating scene. However, dressing stylishly or well shouldnt be held against you in the trust dept. In fact, it should be the other way around. The lawyer our company works with is so deplorably dressed that I have a hard time taking him seriously. In his case, "dressing like a lawyer" hasnt helped his business at all. I have been told dozens of times over the years that I have gotten business because of the way I dress. This is what some of my clients have said: 1. I remembered you over other sales people because you were dressed so nicely. 2. Seeing how you are dressed makes me think you have a greater attention to detail because of of effort and detail you put into your dress. Concerning the legal profession specifically, some of the most successful lawyers could be considered stylish in their own right (although certainly not MY style) - Johnny Cochran and Jerry Spence come to mind.
post #24 of 39
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I agree with that assesment Globetrotter. I think you are right, people look for subtle clues when assessing someone, from business to the dating scene.  However, dressing stylishly or well shouldnt be held against you in the trust dept.  In fact, it should be the other way around.  The lawyer our company works with is so deplorably dressed that I have a hard time taking him seriously.  In his case, "dressing like a lawyer" hasnt helped his business at all. I have been told dozens of times over the years that I have gotten business because of the way I dress.  This is what some of my clients have said: 1. I remembered you over other sales people because you were dressed so nicely. 2. Seeing how you are dressed makes me think you have a greater attention to detail because of of effort and detail you put into your dress. Concerning the legal profession specifically, some of the most successful lawyers could be considered stylish in their own right (although certainly not MY style)  - Johnny Cochran and Jerry Spence come to mind.
phil, I agree, I have actually used this argument many times to justify why people should dress well for work, but I think that it also can be used to understand why too much personal style might not be such a good idea. I think that one of the first bond books mentions not trusting anybody who wears a Windsor knot (and bear with me if I am making a mistake, I read them about 20 years ago) - the infurance being that anybody who took so much time and effort to tie his tie, and did it differently from the rest of his class, was not to be trusted. this is a real borderline issue. I would expect a bow tie, for instance, on somebody who was in a staff position. I would feel unsure about a line manager in a bow tie. I (myself, personally) would be uncomfortable about trusting somebody, for instance, in a 5 botton single breasted suit, or a purple suit, or in a white suit in winter, etc. some people might think that those are perfectly acceptable personal style statments, in the same way that I wear contrast collar shirts and double breasted suits and some people might not trust that.
post #25 of 39
Fair points, but in reality, I would wager an awfully large amount of money that 99.99999999% of american men have no idea what a windsor knot is, much less be able to recognize someone else wearing one.
post #26 of 39
agreed, but I bet if you came into a meeting in kansas with a matching bow tie and pocket square, and a double breasted suit and spectator shoes, people might not know what it was, but they would know it was unusal.
post #27 of 39
well said. But the question is, would that person be treated worse as a result? I dont know that answer. But I sure as hell know I ever have to go to Kansas, I am not wearing white socks and a short sleeve dress shirt just because I might fit in better.
post #28 of 39
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well said. But the question is, would that person be treated worse as a result?  I dont know that answer.  But I sure as hell know I ever have to go to Kansas, I am not wearing white socks and a short sleeve dress shirt just because I might fit in better.
I really think sometimes we overestimate the importance of apperance. People form opinions of others based on more than just apperances. Two different people could get completely different reactions when wearing the same outfit. Eric
post #29 of 39
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Sorry, but I never took care of what was wearing my boss.   One was sticking rubber soles on his Church's. I didn't do the same. I told him it was silly to do that. He should stop.
With tact like that - to think I ever wondered why Ernest is unemployed   Bradford
post #30 of 39
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(Phil @ 23 Dec. 2004, 08:13) well said. But the question is, would that person be treated worse as a result?  I dont know that answer.  But I sure as hell know I ever have to go to Kansas, I am not wearing white socks and a short sleeve dress shirt just because I might fit in better.
I really think sometimes we overestimate the importance of apperance.  People form opinions of others based on more than just apperances. Two different people could get completely different reactions when wearing the same outfit. Eric
Eric, maybe you are right. but in many situations where we have a short time to create an impression, apperence is the only form of comunication that we have. it also seems, according to many studies, that first impressions are very difficult to change. and yes, 2 people could get very different reactions while wearing the same outfit - look at danny divito and Arnald wearing the same outfit in the movie "twins".
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