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Matching stripes on suits - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well going about this mathematically, if you were to take a particular striped pattern, lets use the one in the picture I posted as an example, starting from one point and move on from there; I'll explain. First figure out how to match the stripes at the lapels and collar at either side of the jacket. Then, since the lapels are part of the jacket, the cloth at either end would determine where the stripes would lay. Now that the front of the jacket, and the collar have been matched the next thing to do would be to calculate the back of the jacket, this should primarily match the front of the jacket where the front and back intersect and meet at the shoulder, stripes should match without any problems. If the pattern cannot match where the front and rear meet at the sides of jacket, that is OK, because the sleeves cover that area quite well. If the rear of the collar and back of the jacket does not match, that is unfortunate, but as I mentioned previously, it is the last item that should match; the front of the jacket is much more important. The last item that requires placing is the sleeves; which is the placing of a 3-dimensional object into a 2-dimensional socket, not an easy task, thus at least the front of the jacket where the sleeve meets the armhole, the stripes should match. I recall reading that the matching I described is what Savile Row tailors tend to do when matching patterns, the primary goal is to have the front of the jacket matching. Jon.
post #17 of 27
So if 1 stripe left Philadelphia at 12:15 on a train going 63 miles per hour and the stripe you wanted to match it to... Oh hell, I need some Bourbon to figure this one out.
post #18 of 27
As a Savile Row tailor of 33 years I can tell you that most tailors do not match the stripes where the collar and lapel meet. Again, it requires moving the collar into positions that it does not want, naturally, to go. Also, as said before, when someone has a low shouhlder then the distance from the back neck to the lapel is different each side. I had a new tailor make a stripe jacket for me last week and he matched the stripes from the collar to the lapel. I removed the collar, let the fabric lay where it wanted, and ten restitched it. they did not match. When asked to match stripe at this position I always tell my clients that I'll do it if they wish, but I do not recommend it. Personally, too, I think it looks ugly. I'm with the bourbon guy..
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
As a Savile Row tailor of 33 years I can tell you that most tailors do not match the stripes where the collar and lapel meet. Again, it requires moving the collar into positions that it does not want, naturally, to go. Also, as said before, when someone has a low shouhlder then the distance from the back neck to the lapel is different each side. I had a new tailor make a stripe jacket for me last week and he matched the stripes from the collar to the lapel. I removed the collar, let the fabric lay where it wanted, and ten restitched it. they did not match. When asked to match stripe at this position I always tell my clients that I'll do it if they wish, but I do not recommend it. Personally, too, I think it looks ugly. I'm with the bourbon guy..
Let me guess, stripes shouldn't match on shirts either, right? Writing of which, when H&K match the stripes on their shirts, they match them at the shoulder, the split yoke (of course), the sides of the shirt (where the front and back pieces meet at either end), and at either of the sleeve gauntlets. The area that does not usually get matched is the area of the yoke where it meets the back of the shirt; the stripes get close but are a few millimeters off. I know that there are computer programs out there, where a tailor / sartorial company can input the distance between stripes on a particular piece of fabric, and input the measurements of a client / standard size and the computer will automatically calculate the individual patterns needed to make a jacket / pants / waistcoat. The computer can also calculate the patterns to match the stripes at the indicated intervals of the garnment. Jon.
post #20 of 27
Shirts are a different animal so it would probably be easier to pattern match. On a suit, especially one that's tailored to fit you specifically above all else, I have a harder time seeing.
post #21 of 27
Okay guys, now tell me how you match a Glen plaid or a windowpane, where there is both a horizontal and a vertical component?
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Okay guys, now tell me how you match a Glen plaid or a windowpane, where there is both a horizontal and a vertical component?
That is a whole other ball of wax altogether. Checks are a lot more complex to match, I have only seen checks match at the sleeve / shoulder and sometimes part of the pattern from the lapel to the chest area is also matching. The lapel / collar matching would probably be to complex to match in a check patterned fabric. Jon.
post #23 of 27
ImageWIS, Matching stripes from collar to lapel is a personal choice. Just from a tailoring point of view it is not the best route. As far as computers are concerned, it is not only a mathematical calculation that has to be taken into account. what about the structure of the weave, the nature of the fibre, the twist of the fibre, the % of different types of yarn in the design of the fabric, and the different canvas or fusing used, if any, in the construction? All of these come to play when making a garment, not simply the math. That's really is taking away the art from of a suit. But it is, I have said, up to the individual. Some may like it, or even insist on it, most will listen to the tailor's advice, as biased as that may be.
post #24 of 27
I personally like the stripes on the lapels to sort of match. Not exactly, not precisely, but to give the general idea that, yes, the guy who made this jacket took some time. What's more important to me is if the stripes line up at the darts in the jacket's front: the dart is cut right along one stripe, and its brother stripes on each side are drawn together, lining up with the stripes on the pocket flaps. Also, the stripes on the besom pocket should match with the rest of the chest (although I haven't seen anyone mess this up yet.) The stripes should be lining up on the back of the jacket, converging at the center seam. The stripes at the back of the collar should match the stripes on the back. That's pretty much as far as I will go. The local cutter told me that he's able to match plaids horizontally where the sleeve meets the shoulder, and matches everything else like he matches stripes. I think that's really all that's possible to do.
post #25 of 27
Okay guys, now tell me how you match a Glen plaid or a windowpane, where there is both a horizontal and a vertical component?
post #26 of 27
Arms- Put 6 ice cubes and 4 Ounces of Blanton's Bourbon whiskey in a glass, swirl the glass, then drink it. If the pattern looks badly matched repeat as needed until it looks okay to you :-) ...pull up a seat with me and Len as we work through the math or pass out, whichever happens first.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
If you want all the stripes to match buy one of those pimp suits from Stacy Adams, Zanetti, or any other company that caters to that profession. All their stripes match up perfectly.  The point is, strips aren't supposed to match. As someone pointed out earlier, it looks tacky when they do, plus the geometry dosn't work out either.
I agree - only my Richard James of Savile Row suits have all over matching lines at the lapel and shoulder seam. I don't like it. My Kitons and Brioni's do not match and I like it that way.
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