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How to recognize nationalities through clothes? - Page 2

post #16 of 86
Italians almost never wear french or double cuff shirts. They considern them appropriate only on white or perhaps pale blue shirts, for weddings and formal events. Another dead give away of an Italian shirt: button cuff, the button is as big as an Altoid, and it is placed almost at the base of the cuff.
post #17 of 86
Also: low rise trousers, worn at the hips, with reverse pleats, slim legs, and short enough so that there is no break, and socks show when a guy moves = classic Italian look.
post #18 of 86
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A male in either cords or moleskins in some never before seen colour such as purple, pink, scarlet or bright yellow- Brit. You again ViroBono?
Currently in my wardrobe: Cords - Scarlet, orange, electric blue, navy blue, corn yellow, gold and rust Moleskins: Dark red and dark green Worn with country shoes with double or even triple soles, preferably with Blakeys, or loafers. Socks to be in a contrasting but equally sudden colour, naturally. 100% Polyester RTW uniform, 17 rows of medals but 2 years service, many, many badges, patent shoes, hands in pockets, smoking and saluting indoors - US military officer Polo shirt with collar up, jumper over shoulders, trousers slightly too tight, hair slightly too long and greasy, too much cologne failing to disguise smell of BO and garlic - Johnny Frenchman Expensive but casual designer clothes with many labels on display, iPod, digital camera x 2, latest mobile phone - Japanese
post #19 of 86
Quote:
Dark DB suit with stripes so loud they're practically neon, super wide-spread collar shirt whose collar points curl under at the ends, fraying woven silk tie = Brit.
You left out the pair of black half brogue shoes (usually Church's) that are falling apart, with a completely worn down sole and heel, and that look as if they were polished with a block of concrete.
Quote:
100% Polyester RTW uniform, 17 rows of medals but 2 years service, many, many badges, patent shoes, hands in pockets, smoking and saluting indoors - US military officer
Not true of the US Marines, who are always smartly turned out, even if they may fall short of the standards of the Household Division.
post #20 of 86
Quote:
Quote:
100% Polyester RTW uniform, 17 rows of medals but 2 years service, many, many badges, patent shoes, hands in pockets, smoking and saluting indoors - US military officer
Not true of the US Marines, who are always smartly turned out, even if they may fall short of the standards of the Household Division.
I have worked with the US Marines several times and comparing them with British soldiers is rather like comparing apples and oranges. The doctrine and ethos is entirely different.
post #21 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
(Nonk @ 18 Dec. 2004, 05:14) A male in either cords or moleskins in some never before seen colour such as purple, pink, scarlet or bright yellow- Brit. You again ViroBono?
Currently in my wardrobe: Cords - Scarlet, orange, electric blue, navy blue, corn yellow, gold and rust Moleskins: Dark red and dark green Worn with country shoes with double or even triple soles, preferably with Blakeys, or loafers.  Socks to be in a contrasting but equally sudden colour, naturally. 100% Polyester RTW uniform, 17 rows of medals but 2 years service, many, many badges, patent shoes, hands in pockets, smoking and saluting indoors - US military officer Polo shirt with collar up, jumper over shoulders, trousers slightly too tight, hair slightly too long and greasy, too much cologne failing to disguise smell of BO and garlic - Johnny Frenchman Expensive but casual designer clothes with many labels on display, iPod, digital camera x 2, latest mobile phone - Japanese
Hey, Ernest, are you going to let that go unchallenged? Seriously, my countrymen are somewhat disappointing, but less so than most Americans. US members of this forum excluded, I'm sure. I am impressed by your collection of cords, ViroBono. My husband (American) has a pair of orange cords (French designer) and they are my favorites out of all his wardrobe.
post #22 of 86
ViroBono used to be in the Royal Flying Corps, they had a uniform so smart it had a Phd from Cambridge. (Apologies to Ben Elton and Richard Curtis)
post #23 of 86
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Not all of us...U.S. Navy Officer with 100% Wool bespoke uniforms.
Splendid. I am sure they look much better than the issue variety. Gieves still make the Nelson-style boatcloaks, if you have a couple of thousand pounds to spare. Nonk - how well I remember the twenty-minuters.
post #24 of 86
Quote:
I have worked with the US Marines several times and comparing them with British soldiers is rather like comparing apples and oranges. The doctrine and ethos is entirely different.
Interesting. The US and British forces are obviously very different creatures, but I have heard several people say that the Marines are the part of the US military that is most similar to the British forces. The structure of the Marines and their distinct traditions and history separate from the rest of the US forces create something akin to the British regimental system. John Keegan has written thoughtfully on this, and friends in the British army have made similar comments. Obviously your experiences may differ. Anyway, I'm impressed by your collection of cords and moleskins. I have a few pairs of very loud moleskins, but my cords are more subdued in comparison. I need to see if I can improve my collection in the January sales.
post #25 of 86
I see what you are getting at, Trilby. Some of the differences are that the USMC will often have a commissioned officer doing a job done by a sergeant in our forces; whilst our soldiers often join a particular 'family' regiment based in their home area, this doesn't appear to happen in the USMC, though there's no doubt that the USMC are as fiercely loyal to the Corps as we are to regiments. Another difference is that the USMC are well-equipped and are respected by their government, in stark contrast to our own forces. I should add that we don't go in for all this shouting ('hooah.', or whatever it is), and the group hugs and backslappping that seems to go with it, and which is viewed with both amusement and a little suspicion by our guys, which is odd whn you consider that whilst on ex at MCAS Cherry Point 40 of our Paras went swimming at Myrtle Beach and then queued up to be seated at a local Red Lobster - naked, and thought nothing of it....
post #26 of 86
Quote:
Some of the differences are that the USMC will often have a commissioned officer doing a job done by a sergeant in our forces
Some things are too important to be left in the hands of a British officer. Nonk, former Sergeant.
post #27 of 86
Well, in my experience...safari/cargo-type shorts + DARK socks + athletic shoes or sandals = German, Danish, Dutch, etc. (I normally expect white crew socks (or NO socks) with this kind of garb here in the States.)
post #28 of 86
Quote:
Another difference is that the USMC are well-equipped and are respected by their government, in stark contrast to our own forces.
Sadly true. After the huge political row about sending the Black Watch to Falluja, I'm staggered that this government is now proposing to consolidate the regiment out of existence.
post #29 of 86
Quote:
Hey, Ernest, are you going to let that go unchallenged?  
What?
post #30 of 86
Thread Starter 
Euh... the unpleasant description of the Frenchman above. I can't look at it again, it is too painful.
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