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Upholstering an Eames lounge chair in tweed - Page 3

post #31 of 64
You know how confusing I can be when I talk fast.
post #32 of 64
Not an actual Eames but similar - here's what a Plycraft lounge chair and ottoman look like with orange hopsack or tweed upholstery: http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v5...ounge%20chair/ Here's a vintage Knoll chair with original grey tweed upholstery:
post #33 of 64
I think it would look great but I'm not sure it's a good idea for an articulated lounge chair (recliner) like the Eames. When you recline from sitting up to the lounging position, your body actually slides a little into the chair, so leather is ideal to allow this whereas a material with strong friction with your clothes would make it a bit uncomfortable. Purely theoretical point of view because I've never tried sitting or reclining in a tweed Eames
post #34 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I think it would look great but I'm not sure it's a good idea for an articulated lounge chair (recliner) like the Eames. When you recline from sitting up to the lounging position, your body actually slides a little into the chair, so leather is ideal to allow this whereas a material with strong friction with your clothes would make it a bit uncomfortable. Purely theoretical point of view because I've never tried sitting or reclining in a tweed Eames

Turns out it's a non-issue: Herman Miller wll not use fabric supplied by customers unless it's a contract sale.
post #35 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Turns out it's a non-issue: Herman Miller wll not use fabric supplied by customers unless it's a contract sale.
You could still get an Eames chair upholstered by someone else. I don't think it would be very uncomfortable but I do see gdl's point - you'd want a smooth finished fabric to keep from sticking to the chair as you shift around in it.
post #36 of 64
I dunno if it's tweed...but it sure makes an impression.


post #37 of 64
Thread Starter 
^^^ I would want a traditional-looking tweed that's less bold. But yes, that's the idea. I think a black and white glen plaid could look really nice.
post #38 of 64
Eames (alive) never allowed anything but black leather on his lounge chair, I think he was right.

!luc
post #39 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc-Emmanuel View Post
Eames (alive) never allowed anything but black leather on his lounge chair, I think he was right.

!luc
They, no?

So Mafoo, what are you going to roll in? I think a Jag sedan would be your style.
post #40 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
They, no?

So Mafoo, what are you going to roll in? I think a Jag sedan would be your style.

Well, Charles and Ray designed many things together, but Charles was a prominent designer in his own right before they got married. I don't know if the lounge chair was his or their design.

I'd pick a Benz over a Jag for a large sedan. If I were going mid-size, I'd still pick a Benz--at least until the BMW 5 gets a less ugly face. But it's all moot since I can neither afford nor use a car in NYC.
post #41 of 64
Quote:
Eames (alive) never allowed anything but black leather on his lounge chair, I think he was right.

In this particular case, I don't see any basis to cultivate a purist "black leather only" mantra. I don't think it's true anyway, as early versions were made with Herman Miller's premium tan hides.
post #42 of 64
Quote:
Well, Charles and Ray designed many things together, but Charles was a prominent designer in his own right before they got married. I don't know if the lounge chair was his or their design.

All the moulded plywood stuff was started and their joint venture during the war...long after they were married (how cool is it to have your wedding ring made by Harry Bertoia).

Previous to their marriage, he was a traditional modernist influenced by Mies, Gropius, Corbusier. They first started working together on the MOMA project in 1940, along with Bertoia and Saarinen. She was the painter/sculptor type. It was only after they married that they became the bohemian types...so maybe she was actually the main driving force behind their scultural style?
post #43 of 64
Those plycraft chairs are really cool. How difficult would it be to get someone to reupholster an older one? I mean-- ballpark how much might something like that cost?

I think Mafoofan's tweed idea is pretty interesting. I get what GDL says about the leather, but maybe a fabric upholstery would work alright.
post #44 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
They, no?
yes, my mistake.

!luc
post #45 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by freshcutgrass View Post
In this particular case, I don't see any basis to cultivate a purist "black leather only" mantra. I don't think it's true anyway, as early versions were made with Herman Miller's premium tan hides.
Either you stick with what the designer envisioned his design to look like, or you don't. Of course, in the end it doesn't really matter if for mercantilistic reasons, your piece is produced in several colours.

!luc
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