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Upholstering an Eames lounge chair in tweed

post #1 of 64
Thread Starter 
Would it be possible or practical to upholster an Eames lounge chair in tweed? I know Herman Miller (the manufacturer) will accept a customer's own material, but I worry about how tweed will hold up in that application. Will it wear out prematurely? When rubbed up against the clothes I'm wearing, will it cause extra wear on them?

Is this just a stupid idea?
post #2 of 64
To beat the others - will it be breanish? I really like the idea, and I think a nice tweed should be able to hold up against to the usual wear and tear (unless you plan on having kids anytime soon).
post #3 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by robin View Post
To beat the others - will it be breanish?

I really like the idea, and I think a nice tweed should be able to hold up against to the usual wear and tear (unless you plan on having kids anytime soon).

Ha. Actually, I was thinking of something heavier and more sturdy than Breanish.

As far as wear goes, I figure that tweed has the advantage of not being susceptable to scratches the same way leather is. But I'm afraid that the fabric will wear thin in some areas.
post #4 of 64
For what its worth I used to have an Eames lounge chair, and it was uncomfortable as hell.
post #5 of 64
Why type of setting do you have in mind for a tweed Eames chair?
post #6 of 64
I envision it in elephant skin.
post #7 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by drake View Post
For what its worth I used to have an Eames lounge chair, and it was uncomfortable as hell.

I've found them very comfortable--but only at the store and in other people's homes. What makes it uncomfortable for you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
Why type of setting do you have in mind for a tweed Eames chair?

The living room of our new apartment. Too odd you think?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
I envision it in elephant skin.

You know, I can actually imagine that. But for what it's worth, if I don't get the tweed, I think I'll stick to a dark green pebble grain leather.
post #8 of 64
What does your new living room look like?
post #9 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I've found them very comfortable--but only at the store and in other people's homes. What makes it uncomfortable for you?

I felt the same way at the store. When I got it home it gave me some serious lower back pain.

If you know someone that has one I'd suggest going over to their place and sitting in it for an extended period of time and seeing if you still like it.
post #10 of 64
A few nights ago, around 3am, a man was relaxing on an Eames outside a Brooklyn bodega. He seemed to be comfortable, among the fruits and vegetables.
post #11 of 64
Funny - I'm just considering buying a thirties art deco sofa, and having it upholstered it in tweed. Any tips about cloths that are strong enought to be used as upholstery are much appreciated.
post #12 of 64
I recently upholsted a mid-century couch using some sturdy wool from from a swatchbook. There are some tweedy wools in the books of period appropriate upholstery. I'd start there before looking at suitings.
post #13 of 64
I think both Herman Miller and Knoll offer hopsack as an option for many of their chairs and sofas. It's a rougher, tweed-like fabric -- a little coarser than what you'd see on a blazer. I imagine furniture grade fabric would be heavier than that for clothing. I can't really see the Eames lounger in tweed. Maybe a solid donegal style but not herringbone. I think the interest of the rosewood (or walnut) is where the action is, so IMO the chair looks best with a solid upholstery.
post #14 of 64
I've seen some reupholstered furniture, and the quality can vary considerably, so make sure to check out the upholstery shop's past work first. No use ruining a $$$ chair with a crappy upholstery job.

I'm not sure about tweed or indeed cloth on the Eames as the Eames in black leather and some kind of rosewood is kind of iconic. Also beware that the Eames is pretty fragile, and will need to be repaired perhaps multple times in its lifetime.

Have you looked at other lounge chairs? A recent chair that I really liked is Pierre Paulin's Tulip from Artifort, and there are plenty others out there. Saarinen's Womb chair also looks fantastic in a rough boucle fabric, and it's comfortable.

When I started shopping for furniture, I really wanted the Eames, but that was before I knew what other options were out there.

--Andre
post #15 of 64
Check out apartmenttherapy.com and there are a LOT of discussions on people that have done this and who they used, etc.
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