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Oxxford cut and styling.

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Ok, is Oxxford cut boxy by default RTW cut? Meaning its suited for people with thick middle? Can this boxy suit be altered and have a nice supressed waist with ruining overall look of the suit? Thanks.
post #2 of 24
Answers: On some models, yes default is less suppressed waist. For example, the Manhattan II comes OTR with a minimally suppressed waist (it is not a sack suit though -- it has a darted torso). On other models, default is a pretty nicely suppressed waist. For example, I've found that the Renaissance model and Gibbons models have pretty good waist suppression. The models that default to a less suppressed waist can be taken in without ruining the overall look. I took in my Manhattan coat about 1" to 1.5" and it looks wonderful. Also, the cut isn't "boxy" -- just a less suppressed waist. I use the term "boxy" to mean when the shoulders are pretty square and structured and the middle isn't very suppressed. I have never seen an Oxxford coat I would describe as "boxy" in this sense.
post #3 of 24
Depends on the model. There are many. Some, like the Salvatore, are a concession to "European" styling and have more waist suppression and softer shoulders. Some, like the Manhattan, is more an American style, boxier, workaday suit. I'll let the Oxxford afficionados on the board fill in the details.
post #4 of 24
LA Guy is for the most part right, but I disagree that the Salvatore has "softer" shoulders whereas the Manhattan has "boxy" shoulders. Depending on what we mean by "soft shouldered" -- I use it to refer to a lightly padded, sloped, natural shoulder -- the Manhattan has some of the softest shoulders I have seen. Setting aside Oxxford Crest -- which I have seen but never tried on -- I don't think I've ever seen an Oxxford I would describe as "boxy" in the same sense that a Saks Zegna is boxy.
post #5 of 24
I recently bought a vintage (circa 1983) Oxxford suit from eBay that might fit the boxy description.  It has moderately padded shoulders and a 1" difference between the chest measurement and the waist measurement.  I had my tailor take in the waist a tad (I think too much waist suppression would make the suit look a bit strange), and it looks great.  Before LA Guy chimes in with "and it was a very bad year," I should add that the Oxxford look does not change much over time.   By the tone of your question, you sound like someone who is used to wearing more fashion-forward Italian suits and is hesitant to wear Oxxford.  Don't be.  Oxxford suits have a unique drape -- they feel like a cardigan rather than a jacket.  Unless you are a nightclub promoter, I can't imagine that Oxxford would be inappropriate for your job.
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
Does Oxxford jacket leave any extra material on the back middle seam for let out? If so how much? Thanks
post #7 of 24
Quote:
LA Guy is for the most part right, but I disagree that the Salvatore has "softer" shoulders whereas the Manhattan has "boxy" shoulders.  Depending on what we mean by "soft shouldered" -- I use it to refer to a lightly padded, sloped, natural shoulder -- the Manhattan has some of the softest shoulders I have seen.   Setting aside Oxxford Crest -- which I have seen but never tried on -- I don't think I've ever seen an Oxxford I would describe as "boxy" in the same sense that a Saks Zegna is boxy.
What line that Oxford still makes is their most enduring one? (If any)?
post #8 of 24
Oxxford has a number of profiles and models. In the beginning there was the Ownensia and the Manhattan. No there is the Renaissance XX, the Salvatore, and Oxxford Crest. I cannot comment on the Salvatore. Never saw it at the Oxxford store. The Ownensia and Manhattan are the Oxxford standards. Minially padded, natural shoulders. Think of Geo. W. Bush. The Renaissance XX is a more recent model. The shoulder is a little longer. Think of Michael Douglas who wore the clothing is a mystery-thriller of about 10 years ago. This is the model carried in Bergdorf. The Oxxford Crest has a little longer shoulder. Generally, the Oxxford Crest has bolder colors and fabrics. Think of 1940's Hollywood. I think that a call to either the Oxxford Shop or an Oxxford dealer will answer these questions more authoritatively. The key issue is what looks good on you.
post #9 of 24
I think it'd be a dumb thing to do. If you wear the jacket the way it's intended you'll see what I mean. You would be ruining a very classic jacket in my opinion. I also disagree that less waist supression is for fatties. I have a 12" drop and don't feel the need to go for extreme waist supression at all. I think it looks cartooney.
post #10 of 24
Again, I took the waist in 1" and it didn't ruin the jacket. A competent tailor did it and the jacket looks better. It just isn't the case that the jacket is made to have only one measurement -- on a guy with a bigger middle than me, the unaltered coat is going to fall much different than it would on me. I believe that by taking it in an inch (hardly cartoony -- the waist suppression is now about 3.5") it fits how Oxxford intended it to fit a body.
post #11 of 24
I visited the Oxxford Store today, and I looked through its current style book. There are far more models than the ones that I mentioned. There are about 15 models, such as the Gibbons, Gotham, Manhattan, Wharton, etc. There are models which are not currently in production but which will be made MTM. The style book is not complete in that it doesn't list the most current creation, the Rocco, named after Oxxford's chief of design and production. The differences between one model and another are slight. You have to work with an experienced Oxxford fitter and tailor to see what is right for you as well as to make necessary modifications. Good luck.
post #12 of 24
A further word on cut and styling. I have bought bespoke from London and bespoke and MTM in the USA (Greenfield, Alan Flusser, and others). I think that Oxxford MTM is as good as bespoke regarding both construction and fit. Furthermore, it is better priced at $2,200 versus 2,000 pounds for my London tailor. I have Renaissance XX coats (DB with 6 on 2) which are as good as my London stuff. The key to getting the most out of Oxxford is to work with an experienced salesman/fitter/tailor who knows the product and tailored clothing and is willing to collaborate with you in the process. Good luck.
post #13 of 24
Quote:
In the beginning there was the Ownensia and the Manhattan.
Solely for the benefit of archive-searchers: that model name is spelled Onwentsia.
post #14 of 24
I just picked up a used Onwentsia which also says "Mansion" on the tag - Is Mansion the fabric? I own another Mansion which has a customer's name in the spot where my new one says Onwentsia...

Other older Oxxfords I own are "Collector's Item" and "Heritage" models. - all 1980s vintage.

also, Is the Gibbons closer to an Italian or English influence? I realize it may be more Oxxford/American than either of those two, but I know it has a higher lapel notch (Gorge?) and sleeker waist.....does it have roped shoulders?
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by acole
Solely for the benefit of archive-searchers: that model name is spelled Onwentsia.

I have always assumed that the Oxxford suit model was named after the Onwentsia Club in Lake Forest, IL. I've always found it hard to believe that the Weinberg brothers, who founded Oxxford, would have named one of their suit models after a "restricted" golf club. I suppose that it's possible that Oxxford's subsequent owners lived in Lake Forest.
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