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What Words Do You HATE? - Page 15

post #211 of 340
I hate when the word 'piggy-back' is used in a corporate setting. Fail Epic Moreover, further more blunder
post #212 of 340
When people use "pussy" to describe something that is purulent.
post #213 of 340
Drama, as in "God, Lauren, I really can't stand Jessica, she's always starting drama". The people, usually teenage girls, who are most vocal about "being so over drama" are the ones most likely to engage in "drama", or as sane people call it: being a dumbass.

Snarky. No we do not need a hip euphemism for being a passive-aggressive bitch.

If you allow me to play devil's advocate. Usually spoken by smug-looking college students. I hate both the concept and sound of the phrase. Using it outside of the catholic church's canonization process annoys me to no end.

Lose-Loose Loser-Looser How can this be so difficult?
post #214 of 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post
When people use "pussy" to describe something that is purulent.
a) I had to look up purulent b) who uses pussy in this context: 1. full of, containing, forming, or discharging pus; suppurating: a purulent sore. 2. attended with suppuration: purulent appendicitis. 3. of the nature of or like pus: purulent matter.
post #215 of 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
If you can give me some smaller synonyms for those words, I'll stop using them. 'Side-by-side for comparison without respect to physical location', 'a change in color through aging that beautifies a material'...
You can often substitute compare for juxtapose, faded or old for patina, and sort or organize for reconcile. Juxtaposition used to speak of something vis-a-vis something else is just pretentious sounding. It works best in a situation where there is like a pinhead dwarf standing next to a Marfans giant, not to speak of two different types of sneakers. Patina used for jeans? That's stupid. Patina is mostly used for describing a layer of corrosion or oxidation that forms over years and years on surfaces of metal objects. And reconcile used to say put files in order? Dumb. It's a matter of using everyday words where they will suffice. While the above uses are technically not wrong, they sound pretentious are actually less precise than their simpler counterparts.
post #216 of 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garage/Surf Rock View Post
You can often substitute compare for juxtapose, faded or old for patina, and sort or organize for reconcile. Juxtaposition used to speak of something vis-a-vis something else is just pretentious sounding. It works best in a situation where there is like a pinhead dwarf standing next to a Marfans giant, not to speak of two different types of sneakers. Patina used for jeans? That's stupid. Patina is used for describing a layer of corrosion or oxidation that forms over years and years on surfaces of metal objects. And reconcile used to say put files in order? Dumb.

It's a matter of using everyday words where they will suffice.

I see what you mean. I hate pretentious diction too, but that's a problem beyond words.
post #217 of 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garage/Surf Rock View Post
You can often substitute compare for juxtapose, faded or old for patina, and sort or organize for reconcile. Juxtaposition used to speak of something vis-a-vis something else is just pretentious sounding. It works best in a situation where there is like a pinhead dwarf standing next to a Marfans giant, not to speak of two different types of sneakers. Patina used for jeans? That's stupid. Patina is mostly used for describing a layer of corrosion or oxidation that forms over years and years on surfaces of metal objects. And reconcile used to say put files in order? Dumb. It's a matter of using everyday words where they will suffice. While the above uses are technically not wrong, they sound pretentious are actually less precise than their simpler counterparts.
It has always seemed to me that while there are many general words, such as 'compare,' these words have a host of synonyms that carry unique nuance, which allows language to have specificity, and color, and emotion, and clarity. I agree that it is a perversion of language to swap out one of these more specific (and perhaps elegant) words to elevate stupidity, as in your 'reconciliation' example, but I also worry that the charge of pretense will be a blow to the appropriate use of better language. That charge seems very powerful in the U.S., where so many people do not like to be seen as better than 'just folks.' Neither elegance nor grace need be an assault on humanity. ~ H
post #218 of 340
I hate when people start off every sentence with "I mean..."
post #219 of 340
There are few words that infuriate me more than the unidiomatic overuse of the word "fewer." Thus we will see such atrocities as, "It is fewer than five miles from here." "The crowd numbered fewer than 5,000." (Not as bad as the first example, but I still think "less than 5,000" is more idiomatic.) The hideous overuse of "fewer" is almost invariably the work of punctilious, leaden-fisted copy editors with a modicum of education but no feel for the language.

In my many years as an editor, I have often found copy editors did much more harm than good to the copy.
post #220 of 340
+1 on "irregardless"

The use of the word "Addicting". For some reason I find it really annoying.
post #221 of 340
It's amazing how often I hear "the proof is in the pudding". No, it isn't. The proof of the pudding is in the eating. Also, people who recant conversations thus: "I was like [...], then she was like [...], so I was like [...]". Incorrect use of less and fewer, and also people who use "different to" rather than "different from" (I'll allow the Americanism "different than", though you won't catch me using it). I know it's petty and pedantic, but so be it
post #222 of 340
''hella''
post #223 of 340
The use of a subject when the object of a preposition is appropriate, e.g., in the phrase, "just between you and I." I hear this on TV all the time, mostly by sports commentators.
post #224 of 340
I'm so sick of the word "douchebag", it's just an overused put-down catchall with no real meaning.
post #225 of 340
ADD and OCD.
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