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Turning a single vent to a double vent?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
It seems that a lot of people don't like the single vent suits, myself included. For me it seems to be what i keep finding at decent prices that i can afford and well its what i've picked up. I was wondering is there anyway to turn a single vented jacket into a double vent? Will it cost a lot? Nik
post #2 of 14
It cannot be done.
post #3 of 14
No. But every time you start to get picky about a detail like that (and I am writing this to myself as much as to you), ask yourself this question: If I had never found(ed) that damn forum, would I care? Probably not. Double vents are cool, and a good choice for MTM or bespoke, but shouldn't really be a deal-breaker IMO. Of course if they hold a deeper meaning for you, you're entitled to your opinion.
post #4 of 14
It can be done...if the jacket is about four or six inches too large in the waist and skirt area. Otherwise there will not be enough fabric to go behind the flap between the vents, and they will forever be spread open.
post #5 of 14
LOFL. Nice answer Hopkins Student. You'd have your double vents, a chest about 4 inches too big, shoulders 2 inches too wide, and a huge tailoring bill to boot. FWIW, I saw Closer the other night and Jude Law wore single vents on all his single breasted suits. Single vents take a bashing sometimes here, but there is little wrong with them IMO. I prefer double vents, but sometimes you've gotta bite the bullet. IMO, if you are looking at a price point, shoulder silhouette, fabric, and fit are far more important than vents.
post #6 of 14
An affordable alternative, which I heartily recommend, is no vent at all. Ask a competent alterations man to sew the darned thing up. It shouldn't cost much more than $20. (But don't trust your precious jacket to a mere seamstress.)
post #7 of 14
Dear God no. I can't stand the look of unvented, aside from on a dinner jacket.
post #8 of 14
hopkins student--Could you be persuaded to reconsider? Cary Grant and (several) other '30s icons were addicted to the ventless jacket. Nobody's claiming that these guys--Grant, Menjou, Fairbanks, et al.--were infallible, exactly, but they'll certainly do until someone better comes along. The Duke of Windsor, no greenhorn himself, was most often seen in double vented jackets. Center vented? Nah.
post #9 of 14
Ventless is preferable to single vent, IMHO. Far preferable.I've had single vents sewn up before, and will do it again. I don't have a single vent left in my entire wardrobe at this point.
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Actually i saw a post saying to sew up the single vent which made me think of asking this question. I do like the double vent more but not really that big of a deal, i'm more fond of the single vent than no vent unless anyone cares to change my mind on that one.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Actually i saw a post saying to sew up the single vent which made me think of asking this question. I do like the double vent more but not really that big of a deal, i'm more fond of the single vent than no vent unless anyone cares to change my mind on that one.
I much prefer a single vent to none, so I won't try to change your mind
post #12 of 14
My thoughts: At the beginning of my suiting life -- which is to say junior year in college -- I would only consider ventless. I thought single vented was old-manish and double vents too "odd." I liked the obsessively clean line through the hip that only ventless jackets can really give you. I stayed this way for several years. About 18 months ago I started to like how a vented jacket "skirts" away, especially when you walk -- you can keep the jacket buttoned and you still have beautiful movement in the bottom of the jacket when you walk. In addition, I saw how the double vent broke up the line between the pants and the jacket, making the suit seem less like a uniform and more like two separate parts working perfectly together. I at first liked the single vent because double vents just felt too stylish, if that makes sense. I once purchased a terrific Lubiam flannel suit for $200 and took it back because it was double vented (it was fused, but still it was a terrific suit -- Lord how I wish now I kept it, as I need a flannel suit for winter). Even after I started upon this board 8 months ago, I still preferred single vent. It was only until about four months ago that I got comfortable with the concept of the double vent. See, here was the deal -- I need a jacket taken in at the waist almost always, and nothing looks worse than a double vented jacket that fits like a box. Really it's true. Then one day I tried on a Cantarelli for Brooks Brothers double vented jacket. The waist fit perfectly and the look of the double vent started to look good. Indeed, I liked it better than the single vent because of the symetry -- you have either side overlapped by the center cloth, whereas in the single vent it is asymetrical. I then started to sort of despise the center vent because of the asymetry -- how mathematically sloppy, I thought. At this point, I just wrote off the ventless jacket because I desired that movement in the bottom of the jacket that I spoke of before. I even refused to buy a perfectly fitting D'Avenza suit that I saw at Filene's Basement for $350 because it was ventless (and it was in a fabric I absolutely loved). Now I realize that it is all just silliness. Each jacket has their own merit. None is any more inherently stylish than any of the others. They just offer different things. The ventless is obviously distinct from the vented. The double vent offers you the thrill of putting our hands in your pockets and knowing that you ass is still covered. And it gives you the satisfaction of knowing that you have a detail that most American men don't have on their suits. The single vent is more relaxed and preppy. It gives you that Americana that -- I apologize -- double vented suits just will never have. While it dumbs the suit down to "commoner" status, you can still delight in knowing that your vent hangs properly thanks to a perfectly nipped waist, compliments of your local tailor. Sew up the vent? Why. On a well-cut suit, the maker intended the suit to have a single vent. Sewing it up risks not only the cut, but is a slap in the face to the artisan (or team of artisans) that worked so hard to make it. I wear my single vented suits proudly. If you ever see me at an evening function, you will see me in double vents. But don't cast aspersions on me when I am walking home from work in my Alden cap toes and two-button, single vented, natural shouldered Oxxford suit.
post #13 of 14
I know this sounds strange, but I think the single vent can be both dynamic and interesting as well as 'american commoner'. of course, I prefer the former element, of course. the double vent to me is quieter. as for ventless, it's more streamlined, but on the other hand it's a little stifling. each have their own pros and cons.. i'd also like to add that it's a bit funny how exposed people seem to feel when their buttocks are on show, even though they are wearing pants. I know, it's the principle, but still.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Dear God no. I can't stand the look of unvented, aside from on a dinner jacket.
Hmmm, I only ever wear unvented jackets or coats...except for one double vented sport jacket that I've been too lazy to have closed up. I realize that double vents have advantages for the wearer for both practical and asthetic reasons but I remain wedded to ventless tops.
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