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Sauerkraut

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
1. Other than sausages, what do you use this with?

2. I have decided to make my own. I have even heard of adding anything from juniper berries(common advice) to things like a bouquet garni, to a little grapefruit juice. For my first batch I was thinking about just doing salt/caraway seeds/and a little yogurt whey. What do you think? What would be worth trying next?

3. Why are traditional fermenting crocks so expensive? It's just ceramic. Maybe I am not looking in the right places. Any resources to share?
post #2 of 17
You jerk, now I kind of want to go out and get some sauerkraut. I haven't had any in awhile.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post
1. Other than sausages, what do you use this with?
It's a pretty good addition to just about any german/austrian dish. Not too bad in some types of sandwiches as well.

Making it seems like a pain though.
post #3 of 17
there is this hole in the wall place near my office that has a sauerkraut pizza. no sauce, just kraut and a little cheese.

sounds disgusting but surprisingly very good.

it's destruction of your digestive system is not so good though.
post #4 of 17
This is God's very own food. http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/reci...6_5006,00.html You'll probably want to cut the recipe in half.
post #5 of 17
At the first sign of autumn arriving I make a casserole of smoked pork chops and canadian bacon with sauerkraut. I add some grannie smith apples in at the last moment just to soften up, some caraway seeds and get the beers real cold. Four months to go.
post #6 of 17
my dad makes this crazy soup with sauerkraut and sausage.
post #7 of 17
A Reuben sandwich.
post #8 of 17
my russian grandma makes a sauerkraut/barley soup. good stuff.
post #9 of 17
Deep-fried sauerkraut balls?
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
A Reuben sandwich.
I only like it on reuben sandwiches and hot dogs.
post #11 of 17
No matter how you prepare it, your ass will become a deadly force.
post #12 of 17
Mix it with chopped pickles and onions for a salad
Cook it with shredded pork and stuff it into thin crepe like pancakes (verinikie....Ukraininan dish)
Use in a pork soup
post #13 of 17
Juniper berries for flavour, and smoked pork loin chops (known as Kessler in German). The use of this meat permits one to make the second best gravy in the pantheon of german cooking. Top position of course is resided by rouladen gravy.

Slight thread jack, rouladen:
Take the meat and ensure it is pounded fairly thin, spread a thin layer of good dijon mustard on, sprinkle with salt, freshly cracked black pepper, and lots of good paprika. Dice white onion fairly small, also dicing some good bacon as well (go to a butcher for this, it will make a difference. My butcher (german) has a paprika smoked bacon that is fantastic). The bacon is needed beause the meat is so lean it will dry out without additional fat. Roll up, skewer with toothpick. Sear the rouladen with a little oil, place them in a roaster/dutch oven/whatever and add enough water to cover a little more than half of the rouladen. Add a boullion cube. Roast for about 45 minutes. Remove the rouladen and reduce the sauce until a gravy-like consistency. Serve with spaetzle and braised red cabbage (divine) for the ultimate German meal.

I'm hungry now.
post #14 of 17
OH, for fermenting I have advice. Since you know about how to make it and sterilize, I'm sure, I'll just skip to making a cheap crock: Get a glass mixing bowl. Taller is better than wider. Take a plastic bag, like a cellophane veggie bag from the store that you put produce in, and fill it up with water. Put the cabbage in the bowl with the salt and spices and then put the bag over top. It's a weight that's form-fitting, so air doesn't mix in. The biggest advice I have is to not peek or else all other kinds of bacteria will get in and ruin it. And I've heard inconclusive things re: raw garlic and botulism in sauerkraut, so I'd avoid fermenting it like that.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by denning View Post
Juniper berries for flavour, and smoked pork loin chops (known as Kessler in German). The use of this meat permits one to make the second best gravy in the pantheon of german cooking. Top position of course is resided by rouladen gravy.

Slight thread jack, rouladen:
Take the meat and ensure it is pounded fairly thin, spread a thin layer of good dijon mustard on, sprinkle with salt, freshly cracked black pepper, and lots of good paprika. Dice white onion fairly small, also dicing some good bacon as well (go to a butcher for this, it will make a difference. My butcher (german) has a paprika smoked bacon that is fantastic). The bacon is needed beause the meat is so lean it will dry out without additional fat. Roll up, skewer with toothpick. Sear the rouladen with a little oil, place them in a roaster/dutch oven/whatever and add enough water to cover a little more than half of the rouladen. Add a boullion cube. Roast for about 45 minutes. Remove the rouladen and reduce the sauce until a gravy-like consistency. Serve with spaetzle and braised red cabbage (divine) for the ultimate German meal.

I'm hungry now.

........me too, I'm also thinking tweeds and boots.
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