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The Rubinacci Thread. - Page 112

post #1666 of 4245
Well, those quarters are slightly more closed that I might expect, but not dramatically so. Mostly it's that the jacket seems to sit awkwardly and specifically that it's pulling upward in the front, but I'm no expert and it's hard to tell from a single picture
post #1667 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post
It sounds better. The vinyl's crystal structures are better aligned.

--Andre

Are you Franning me, dude?


- B
post #1668 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Are you Franning me, dude?


- B

It is said that some tailors cryogenically treat their plaids first, so that the tweed atoms are better aligned for easier pattern matching. I believe most tailors in Naples are either too poor (perhaps through profligate marketing expenses and blogger largesse) or averse to any kind of machine assistance to refrigerate liquid nitrogen, hence the sprezzatura of pattern mismatching.

--Andre
post #1669 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal_1 View Post
amazingly high armholes in that Luca picture ^

How did you judge the depth of the armholes based on a picture with both arms down?

About that pulling at the front thing by your tailor (or Mariano Rubinacci):

When you put your coat on ( slip into it, pull the shirt sleeves down, move your arms a bit and you're good to go), it has to fit properly.
If there is a defect (in case of Rubinacci it's usually an incorrect shoulder slope) it will stay, no matter how hard a tailor (or Mariano Rubinacci) will pull down the fronts.
Same applies to the advice of "wearing a garment hard for a couple of weeks".
While it's true that the construction (canvas mostly) does respond to body sweat and heat, if there are fit and balance issues, they won't go away.
If, for example, the collar is off the neck it will stay there and it won't magically move closer to the neck after a couple of weeks.

@Chris Despos: Thanks for the great explanation and yet another tip to achieve "visual balance"(TM)!
post #1670 of 4245
From my understanding, pulling down on the jacket does two things: (1) reveals flaws, and (2) helps to settle in the jacket.

All I can say on the latter is that it seems to make a particularly big difference with heavier cloths. It's well-documented by non-Rubinacci clients and tailors that heavy tweed jackets need to be worn for some time before they look their best. My blue donegal jacket fits and feels noticeably better now than when I first got it--and I have routinely tugged down on the fronts or had my wife do it. To me, it makes sense that it would help. If gravity normally does the trick on its own over time, why wouldn't physical pulling speed up the process?
post #1671 of 4245
If I understand correctly, the pull Mariano does, is at the fitting stage of the jacket. This is to keep the jacket, sans lining, to not cling to the shirt. After, he lifts the jacket at the collar/shoulder and lets it settle. This is what you want to do when putting a finished jacket on, the collar thing, pulling on the fronts of a finished jacket is irrelevant and unnecessary. Finished jacket has a imprint of your form and will settle where it is meant to on its own. If not, something may need adjusting.
post #1672 of 4245
A good way to weigh down the fronts of a jacket is to place one treed Allen-Edmonds second in each hip out pocket.

Each shoe thus filled weighs fifteen pounds. This is approximately the angular force of a leaning Mariano.

If you are artful with rope, an alternative is to string the rope through the buttonholes of the fronts a certain way and then nap in the resulting hammock your jacket becomes. Three or four naps reputedly do the truck.

I've only seen YouTubes of the first way; the second only appears in a wayward LL thread.

- B
post #1673 of 4245
^
Links?
post #1674 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
A good way to weigh down the fronts of a jacket is to place one treed Allen-Edmonds second in each hip out pocket.

Each shoe thus filled weighs fifteen pounds. This is approximately the angular force of a leaning Mariano.

If you are artful with rope, an alternative is to string the rope through the buttonholes of the fronts a certain way and then nap in the resulting hammock your jacket becomes. Three or four naps reputedly do the truck.

I've only seen YouTubes of the first way; the second only appears in a wayward LL thread.

- B



Should one use lasted cedar shoe trees or generic trees bought from ebay?
post #1675 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
^
Links?

I'm having a rare for me vodka martini now before lunch (crisply fried whiting; no kimchi.) Responding to your request is at the top of my To-Do list when I'm done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by srivats View Post


Should one use lasted cedar shoe trees or generic trees bought from ebay?

Forvm lore calls for shelling out on the lasted trees for AE seconds. These lasted trees have to be ripped from the production floor, so most who have them have misdemeanor dings on their permanent record.


- B
post #1676 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoefan View Post
I liked Human Sexual Response and Mission of Burma back in the day. My brother was a roadie/lighting guy for HSR for a while. Pretty good music, great live performances.

never expected to see HSR referenced here! a few years ago, in Tokyo and wanting to wallow in alienation, i played "Land of the Glass Pinecones" on my iPod over and over and over ...
post #1677 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
I'm having a rare for me vodka martini now before lunch (crisply fried whiting; no kimchi.)

Someone really needs to invent the kimchitini. It may be effective in plying a discount out of Despos.

--Andre
post #1678 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post
Someone really needs to invent the kimchitini. It may be effective in plying a discount out of Despos.

--Andre

In Japan, can't you get a suppository made from kimchi from one of those ubiquitous vending machines?

I know: that's not a cocktail like you posit. Nonetheless, the alcohol content is bound to be high.

- B
post #1679 of 4245
Surely there is a market for Kimchi Vodka Swirl.
post #1680 of 4245
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post
Someone really needs to invent the kimchitini. It may be effective in plying a discount out of Despos. --Andre
Discount is set into my pricing. I am the CarMax of custom clothing. No haggle, one price for all. Substitute kimchi for olive
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