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Jealousy over 50 grand wardrobe - Page 3

post #31 of 51
I just think there are attitudinal things in Europe (and the rest of the world) that make customer service a lesser priority than in the US. Being involved in sales for most of my professional career and the retail industry for much of it, my experience is that attitudes are totally different in the US. One example, in Austria (which is actually one of the better countries for customer service purposes) I was at the train station attempting to buy a ticket, and there was one ticket window open, and maybe 10 people in line. It was about 12:55, and when the clock hit 1 PM, the person closed the window, and went to lunch, leaving the people in line pretty much SOL. In the US, they would probably have opened up another window to minimize the wait for the people in line, and leaving your station with customers in line would probably get you fired at a retail store. In the US, the attitude is that "the customer is always right" which creates an annoying sense of entitlement (at least when viewed from the perspective of the retailer) but certainly we emphasize customer service more than other countries in my experience.
post #32 of 51
i agree with you there. I often see frustrated American tourists because they are used to a certain level of customer service which they simply don't get here. But it does very much depend on the type of store. Although I must say, that the Vuitton store in Paris is 10x more friendly than the Vuitton store in Amsterdam. It's indeed a attitude 'problem'. But I have the feeling it is improving in Europe. Especially since the mid 90s when the economy was soaring and people were spending.
post #33 of 51
It may very well be, certainly it seems store clerks etc, in Paris are certainly less rude and dismissive than they were in the 90s. I think attitudes can change, but some of it is ingrained. American businesses operate on the principle that if someone has a bad experience, they will tell many people and that will cause issues down the road, while Europeans seem to shrug off some bad experiences as "just the way things are" while Americans seem much more likely to take action.
post #34 of 51
Quote:
It may very well be, certainly it seems store clerks etc, in Paris are certainly less rude and dismissive than they were in the 90s.  I think attitudes can change, but some of it is ingrained. American businesses operate on the principle that if someone has a bad experience, they will tell many people and that will cause issues down the road, while Europeans seem to shrug off some bad experiences as "just the way things are" while Americans seem much more likely to take action.
In Europe we basically are always amazed on how quickly Americans take action or even to want to talk to the manager about something. Especially when we hear about all those lawsuits etc. etc. Something like an 'Ambulance Chaser' would be simply unthinkable here, while we see many (of course exaggerated) examples of these people in American movies. I've been to Miami several times and I have done some touristy stuff there. But before you can even rent a waterscooter you have to fill in so many forms thay you accept all risk etc. It's pretty much out of the question here.
post #35 of 51
Quote:
This is a practice that is really common in the US, when I was at Best Buy, I interviewed people who did this on a district wide basis, and also people to shop our competitors as well.  You can find out alot about zoning, merchandising, and customer service quite easily this way.  I'm not sure that it would be easy to create a business in this functional area, but then again, with the relatively low level of customer service in most of Europe, maybe there would be demand for such a business, my only reservation is that I'm not sure the top management cares if they have a high level of customer service, and neither do the clientile, apparently.
But business is low in France, sales does not go up and advertising costs are higher and higher. Mistery client is the perfect solution to increase sales at a low cost. My aim is to import the US client services in France. I would like to start with luxury goods.
post #36 of 51
Quote:
It may very well be, certainly it seems store clerks etc, in Paris are certainly less rude and dismissive than they were in the 90s.  I think attitudes can change, but some of it is ingrained. American businesses operate on the principle that if someone has a bad experience, they will tell many people and that will cause issues down the road, while Europeans seem to shrug off some bad experiences as "just the way things are" while Americans seem much more likely to take action.
There is great job to do. I will change the things. I will become famous and rich within 3 years. You could say you were laughing because I was unemployed... Next time you come in La Courneuve, you will see people in grey suits everywhere, smiling at you.
post #37 of 51
Quote:
But business is low in France, sales does not go up and advertising costs are higher and higher. Mistery client is the perfect solution to increase sales at a low cost. My aim is to import the US client services in France. I would like to start with luxury goods.
Not a bad idea.  The hurdle will be to convince retailers that you are offering a useful service (essentially you would be retail consultants,) i.e. that your service would increase their profits.  This may be difficult because as Roy and Drizzt have stated, Europeans are already accustomed to generally poor customer service.  However, because 1) Americans and Japanese tourists are not, 2) the weak dollar has significantly decreased a lot of American incentive to buy luxury goods in Europe, and 3) Parisian retailers depend in part on tourist dollars, it might be possible to convince retailers to use your service on the basis of American retail data alone. Oh, and you might even want to mine travelling forum members (discerning clients) and their travel partners (perhaps less so) as "consultants", if your business is going to have any credibility if you take the advic above. Good luck.  See, Chinese good at business.  (Especially Cantonese - we're famous for business sense.)
post #38 of 51
chorse123, I am glad you are sorry because I stick to my guns. For a professional wardrobe, it is very modest. I think you deceive yourself about the cost of your own wardrobe for instance, if you were to have to replace it instantly. Before I even built my wardrobe into something usable for professional wear, I made calculations for insurance purposes when a valise was lost (it was found). The cost of even a casual wardrobe, in toto, is staggering.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Quote:
But business is low in France, sales does not go up and advertising costs are higher and higher. Mistery client is the perfect solution to increase sales at a low cost. My aim is to import the US client services in France. I would like to start with luxury goods.
Not a bad idea.  The hurdle will be to convince retailers that you are offering a useful service (essentially you would be retail consultants,) i.e. that your service would increase their profits.  This may be difficult because as Roy and Drizzt have stated, Europeans are already accustomed to generally poor customer service.  However, because 1) Americans and Japanese tourists are not, 2) the weak dollar has significantly decreased a lot of American incentive to buy luxury goods in Europe, and 3) Parisian retailers depend in part on tourist dollars, it might be possible to convince retailers to use your service on the basis of American retail data alone. Oh, and you might even want to mine travelling forum members (discerning clients) and their travel partners (perhaps less so) as "consultants", if your business is going to have any credibility if you take the advic above. Good luck.  See, Chinese good at business.  (Especially Cantonese - we're famous for business sense.)
I will employ you all in 2 years...
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Quote:
But business is low in France, sales does not go up and advertising costs are higher and higher. Mistery client is the perfect solution to increase sales at a low cost. My aim is to import the US client services in France. I would like to start with luxury goods.
Not a bad idea.  The hurdle will be to convince retailers that you are offering a useful service (essentially you would be retail consultants,) i.e. that your service would increase their profits.  This may be difficult because as Roy and Drizzt have stated, Europeans are already accustomed to generally poor customer service.  However, because 1) Americans and Japanese tourists are not, 2) the weak dollar has significantly decreased a lot of American incentive to buy luxury goods in Europe, and 3) Parisian retailers depend in part on tourist dollars, it might be possible to convince retailers to use your service on the basis of American retail data alone. Oh, and you might even want to mine travelling forum members (discerning clients) and their travel partners (perhaps less so) as "consultants", if your business is going to have any credibility if you take the advic above. Good luck.  See, Chinese good at business.  (Especially Cantonese - we're famous for business sense.)
Last time I went to Dunhill in an outlet shop I look at cufflinks. Result = - one wrong price, more 20% than the retail price at the origin - employee saying me it is the correct price from London - the manager coming, checking and saying me I was right and saying the employee to check before answering. They said me they were controled on prices... You can not imagine the potential of my talent to find the small things which nobody sees.
post #41 of 51
I think it depends, I'm tending to agree with Dr. Bresch, I think my usual spending on clothing/accessories per year is around $30-50k, give or take a few thousand here or there... I don't replace that many items though, I like to hoard things, I think I've bought about 15 suits this year, about 20 pairs of shoes, 50 ties, 50 dress shirts, 3-4 leather jackets... I don't think it would be difficult for me to spend $50k on clothing, but all at one time would be a bit more than usual.
post #42 of 51
ernest, I like your idea, I think it has potential, I just think a bit of research to find out who may be doing similar things in Europe may be a good idea.
post #43 of 51
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You can not imagine the potential of my talent  to find the small things which nobody sees.
Certainly we need not imagine your inherent talent for finding the small things--it is abundantly clear. As far as the potential that lies therein, that remains to be seen...
post #44 of 51
If we're talking about WNTW on TLC, I'm not a fan of that show. I think the men on this forum could do a better job than the expert stylists they use. Too many times, I've noticed that the fit or something else is off at the end of the show. And, all the men end up looking the same, regardless of their occupation or lifestyle. I think Carson on Queer Eye does a better job of taking that into account, and creating a style that fits the person.
post #45 of 51
Quote:
I will employ you all in 2 years...
Awesome... how much are you paying me Ernest? Evidently, I need $50,000 for a wardrobe to keep up with status quo.
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