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So I'm taking up Muay Thai - Page 7

post #91 of 129
Quote:
The sparring isn't in the ring sparring but switching partners all night and basically going at about 25% to 50% depending on one's level. It isn't intimidating at all.
ya my place is like this, but West24 is right, the new guys are inevitably very tense, either throw hard and wild or not at all, but at the same time, I do see Steve's (gym owner) point that they learn techniques, then they start applying them right away with someone who knows them already and can help them on the real world application. OE - glad to hear you liked it. The gf joined with you, right? How'd she go?
post #92 of 129
Thread Starter 
Yeah, my wife (not gf) came too and she loved it too. I think she's hooked also.
post #93 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater View Post
Yeah, my wife (not gf)

Dodged a bullet there, though at least they might have been wearing padding if they'd met.
post #94 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T View Post
ya my place is like this, but West24 is right, the new guys are inevitably very tense, either throw hard and wild or not at all, but at the same time, I do see Steve's (gym owner) point that they learn techniques, then they start applying them right away with someone who knows them already and can help them on the real world application.
I think that's the same in any sport (or, at least that's been my experience). I was never afraid of getting hurt in hockey against very skilled players. They usually had their faculties under control. It was always the new guys hitting me in the face with their sticks, pucks flying everywhere, running into people. Beware the NOOB!
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
post #95 of 129
post #96 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T View Post
... either throw hard and wild or not at all...

Hmmm... are you criticizing my style, Matt? Because I can do the crazy fighting, chin up, head waving, haymaking thing if you'd like. Sure, I might get knocked out, but so might you. I fight like a crazed, drunk, monkey. Actually, in lower tier MMA fights, I find these types of fights, especially between two big, fat, heavyweights, amusing to watch. You can see it in the dudes' eyes. The guy is in his corner, strategizing: "No way I am going to the ground, and my kicks are suspect, but I (think) I have a pretty solid jaw, and I am way strong, so I'm just gonna rush him and swing." And the other guy is thinking the same, and the result is like a a sumo fight with dudes chest to chest, posture totally squared up, swinging for the fences. Better yet is when neither guy is a particularly good puncher and both actually have decent chins, so the fight actually lasts a while.

Another fun type of fight to watch is when a not particularly skilled striker chases a guy who clearly doesn't want to get punched around the ring or cage. The striker isn't good enough to cut off the space, so everything misses, and the other dude is just avoiding getting hit by essentially going counterclockwise. Awesome
post #97 of 129
congrats on getting started, master the teep (push kick) and you'll beat most boxers, master the jab and you'll have an edge over most MT fighters

this is from personal exprience
post #98 of 129
I want to take Muay Thai long enough to be able to kick myself in the head and knock myself out.
post #99 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 View Post
I want to take Muay Thai long enough to be able to kick myself in the head and knock myself out.

Hard to do. Easier is to go for a double leg shoot, and knock yourself out on the ground going in. No joke. This has happened in real MMA fights. By otherwise competent fighters
post #100 of 129
ive punched myself in the face quite a few times after doing a hook, or upper cut on the bag and its sweaty and just slips right off and into your face. good times.
post #101 of 129
Thread Starter 
Does anyone have an opinion on weight training while training in muay thai, boxing, mma, etc.? A lot of people are of the belief that you should avoid weight training if you are training in martial arts (you will gain strength by practicing technique, and muscles will only slow you down and make you have to fight at a higher weight class, etc.).

I think what I'm going to do is work out with weights 1 day per week, alternating between these two routines:

Workout A:

Squat 3x5
Bench 3x5
Deadlift 1x5

Workout B:

Military Press 3x5
Row 3x5
Power clean 1x5

On other days when I'm doing my MT training, I have been doing things like kettlebell swings, sledge hammer swings, and working on technique/conditioning on the heavy bag at home.

Any thoughts?
post #102 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater View Post
Does anyone have an opinion on weight training while training in muay thai, boxing, mma, etc.? A lot of people are of the belief that you should avoid weight training if you are training in martial arts (you will gain strength by practicing technique, and muscles will only slow you down and make you have to fight at a higher weight class, etc.).

Depends on your ultimate goal, I think. Sounds like you're doing it for the exercise and for better fitness, rather than to become a serious competitor. So I'd say do whatever gets you the desired result. If you want to be bigger, weight training won't prevent you from making progress in muay thai. My chief concern would be burn out -- don't want to layer so much on it stops being fun.
post #103 of 129
Maintaining flexibility or attaining a higher level of it while engaged in a lifting regimen is key. If you stiffen up/tighten up from weight lifting you're a sitting duck.
post #104 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Deacon View Post
Maintaining flexibility or attaining a higher level of it while engaged in a lifting regimen is key. If you stiffen up/tighten up from weight lifting you're a sitting duck.
I can think of something for the OP to try, but it would require changing his thread signature.
post #105 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater View Post
Does anyone have an opinion on weight training while training in muay thai, boxing, mma, etc.? A lot of people are of the belief that you should avoid weight training if you are training in martial arts (you will gain strength by practicing technique, and muscles will only slow you down and make you have to fight at a higher weight class, etc.).

I think what I'm going to do is work out with weights 1 day per week, alternating between these two routines:

Workout A:

Squat 3x5
Bench 3x5
Deadlift 1x5

Workout B:

Military Press 3x5
Row 3x5
Power clean 1x5

On other days when I'm doing my MT training, I have been doing things like kettlebell swings, sledge hammer swings, and working on technique/conditioning on the heavy bag at home.

Any thoughts?


1. I'd differentiate between kettlebells and weights. pretty much any martial artist can benifit from kettlebells. kettlebells aren't about getting big, they support exactly what you need as a martial artist, in my opinion.

2. weights - this sort of comes down to the same basic issue as the "what's the perfect military body" thread. you want to think about what you do well and what you want to have as your strengths and weaknesses. I am slow, and I have short reach, but I have a lot of strength. no matter how much I work at speed and reach, I will be weak on those. but I have an arsenal of good solid blows. so for me, I still like to do some strength work. (I still need to work hard on my wind, but that is another story).


3. if you are seriosly thinking about what weight class you are going to be fighting in, then you are beyond my ability to offer sound advice. good luck.
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