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Non-vented jacket? - Page 2

post #16 of 46
I have one or two ventless jackets - though they're greatly outnumbered by the double-vented jackets in my wardrobe, it's a perfectly acceptable style and can be flattering if executed well. In particular, if done well, I think it can be quite slimming on the slightly pear-shaped of us, by containing the jacket skirt a bit. At least, that's been my experience.
post #17 of 46
I often bespeak my coats without vents. I find it gives you cleaner lines which are a bit more elongating. It is a bit more of a formal look that works particularly well with 12 Oz and greater cloths with a clean drape.

However, I tend to ask for double vents on my summer coats. It actually lets a bit of air in and makes the garment a bit cooler. It goes well with the looser and more casual feeling lighter coloured single breasted and partially lined summer coats I prefer for hotter days.
post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
I often bespeak my coats without vents. I find it gives you cleaner lines which are a bit more elongating. It is a bit more of a formal look that works particularly well with 12 Oz and greater cloths with a clean drape.

However, I tend to ask for double vents on my summer coats. It actually lets a bit of air in and makes the garment a bit cooler. It goes well with the looser and more casual feeling lighter coloured single breasted and partially lined summer coats I prefer for hotter days.

Ignore the rest of this thread and just read the post above. You don't have to do what Sator does, but his explanation is sound and provides all the information you need.

Single vents have their place too, but since they are currently out of fashion, you can ignore them at this stage.
post #19 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
Ignore the rest of this thread and just read the post above. You don't have to do what Sator does, but his explanation is sound and provides all the information you need.

Single vents have their place too, but since they are currently out of fashion, you can ignore them at this stage.

I agree with everything dopey said, except the comment about single vents being "out of fashion": the most important/consistent characteristic of the well dressed man is that he does not follow fashion, but rather has a personal style that compliments and best expresses him. Be who you are, and wear that which compliments and inspires you. You'll feel more natural and empowered.
In that regard, by all means, don't follow fashion; let fashion follow you.

(Full disclosure: I own more than two dozen ventless suit jackets and sportcoats. Of my vented suits/jackets about five are double and maybe eight are single. I love and wear them all, irrespective of what the "fashion" mavens and magazines of the moment may be saying.)
post #20 of 46
I have a non-vented Armani Collezioni sport coat that looks GREAT.
post #21 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spilotro View Post
Is a non-vented suit jacket or sportcoat ok? It seems that most are single or double vented, and I want to make sure it isn't an unwritten "don't" before I pull the trigger.

I'm very new still yet and young, so please bear with me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
I often bespeak my coats without vents. I find it gives you cleaner lines which are a bit more elongating. It is a bit more of a formal look that works particularly well with 12 Oz and greater cloths with a clean drape.

However, I tend to ask for double vents on my summer coats. It actually lets a bit of air in and makes the garment a bit cooler. It goes well with the looser and more casual feeling lighter coloured single breasted and partially lined summer coats I prefer for hotter days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
Ignore the rest of this thread and just read the post above. You don't have to do what Sator does, but his explanation is sound and provides all the information you need.

Single vents have their place too, but since they are currently out of fashion, you can ignore them at this stage.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LARon View Post
I agree with everything dopey said, except the comment about single vents being "out of fashion": the most important/consistent characteristic of the well dressed man is that he does not follow fashion, but rather has a personal style that compliments and best expresses him. Be who you are, and wear that which compliments and inspires you. You'll feel more natural and empowered.
In that regard, by all means, don't follow fashion; let fashion follow you.

(Full disclosure: I own more than two dozen ventless suit jackets and sportcoats. Of my vented suits/jackets about five are double and maybe eight are single. I love and wear them all, irrespective of what the "fashion" mavens and magazines of the moment may be saying.)

I agree that style rather than fashion should be the touchstone. Single vents have their place, regardless of fashion. In fact, I placed an order last week for a single-vented suit because a single vent was the right thing for the suit I want. But the OP was looking for advice to get him started. In that context, I think Sator's summary was perfect and the OP would not go wrong overlooking single vents entirely.
post #22 of 46
I have a few non vented sports coats that I don't mind wearing here and there but I find double or single just sit better. I am partial to double when all is said and done.
post #23 of 46
Is there a consensus on vented/unvented in reference to dinner jackets? I thought I read somewhere that unvented is the classic, but I can't be sure now. Since I'm having one made for me I want to get it right.
post #24 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Admiral Kelvinator View Post
Is there a consensus on vented/unvented in reference to dinner jackets? I thought I read somewhere that unvented is the classic, but I can't be sure now. Since I'm having one made for me I want to get it right.

Unvented is classic, most elegant and correct. Side vents are acceptable. If you think you can keep your hands out of your trouser pockets, that is the route to go.
I have side vents on mine and if I ordered another SB DJ, might still get them again. They bother me more on a DB, though there is not necessarily a good reason for that.
post #25 of 46
These guys are going on about their bespoke clothing, like that's any help for the kind of novice who timidly asks if he would be too bold or out of line in a ventless jacket. If you have a good bespoke tailor, any kind of vent will look good on you. Here are some other pros and cons regarding ready-to-wear (RTW) jackets for the novice to consider. Single vent and ventless are easier to alter in the body. The average alterations tailor cannot take in the body much with a double-vented jacket since it can require rebuilding the vents. If you have a slight athletic build (say, an eight-inch drop), you might avoid double-vents since your average alterations tailor cannot bring in the waist for you. Also, the single vent will not lay flat - either one side stands out from the body, or the two sides open like an inverted V - if the jacket does not fit well. RTW jackets do not often fit many people well. The open vent can be caused by a balance problem, i.e., either the back is too short or too long as, e.g., your posture is too stooped or too erect. It can also be caused by asymmetry such as a dropped shoulder. Also, the lighter in weight the fabric, the more likely you will have odd ripples and an ugly vent. Single vents will lay flat in RTW jackets in very heavy fabrics (e.g., tweeds) more often than they will in RTW jackets in light fabrcis (e.g., the dread "all season wool" or cheap "super 150s"). Since most RTW comes now in very light fabrics, the odds of a clean back and a well-behaved single vent are not so great. The good news is you can close the vent for about $20-$30 and, while this does not make the coat fit any better, it does remove the ugly vent. There's also the general look of the ventless vs. the double vent. The ventless as some have said tends to look more formal. The ventless can also be slimming compared to the double vent, which adds bulk to your sides. So a double vent might look better on a beanpole who wishes to bulk up, and a ventless jacket might look better on a short man who wishes to look slimmer and thus taller. A double vent on a short man may help to make him look like a cannonball, and a ventless jacket on a tall man may make him look more like a telephone pole. I read a book that went on and on about this once. I think the author was Chesterfield. Anyway, these tendencies are not sure things, but something to consider with other characteristics of a suit, such as stripes to add height, dark colors to look more slim (and tall), heavy fabrics to add bulk, and horizontal stripes for criminal.
post #26 of 46
thank you for the very informative post ^
post #27 of 46
I like the non-vented jacket, although right now it seems to be "so totally 1990s" for a lot of people (a shame). If you look at all those old Hollywood movies (not just North by Nortwest) you'll see a whole lot of ventless jackets ... preferred by old-time Hollywood for it's slimming lines.

Double vents are fine, and allow dignified hand-pocketting.

Single vents I dislike, for reasons relating to posterior exposure.
post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by el Guapo WOngO! View Post
Nearly all my GA suits are plain back (yes it his style), & have yet to receive a negative feedback on & off the forum (WAYWT).

I'm quite disappointed to hear this - I always thought they were double-vented.
post #29 of 46
I've been watching a few movies made in NYC around 1935 and practically every character is wearing a ventless jacket, some of them are very "dapper" characters who have an impeccable wardrobe. I want to get one now.
post #30 of 46
I have a few ventless suits/sportcoats and love them, although my preference is for vents, single or double. I have a very light brown plaid Canali 2 button in a Super 120s that's perfect for summer, and a charcoal Valentino suit, also ventless. The only thing is fit is not forgiving in a ventless suit. You need to make sure it fits well, or it looks awful.
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