or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Crittendon - How does it fit
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Crittendon - How does it fit - Page 2

post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
I like the roped shoulders...shows it's not what we typically associate with high end RTW Italian.

Hard to wrap my head around seeing Matt in something other than his typical style. I don't see the coat so much as Matt.

Are the sleeves as full as they look? How about the armholes?

Despite the discount price, I'd find myself hesitant to pay so much for a suit made in China.
post #17 of 39
It looks pretty good. How does it feel when you move arond?

The breast pocket looks low to me. I'm not sure I caught how high the armholes are in the other thread.

--Andre
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
I don't see the coat so much as Matt.

+1. We need some styleless person to model this thing.

--Andre
post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I took two pictures of the fit of the Crittendon jacket (actually part of a suit) I reviewed earlier. For the first picture, I pinned the back a bit to give it the after tailoring effect, and for the second I shot it as is. Obviously, the sleeves are too long, and the coat is slightly too long for my taste as well. The shoulders have quite a nice shape, and the overall look of the jacket is very, very nice. I am interested to hear your comments, as I am seriously surprised and impressed.

Pinned to look like it would as worn:

Unpinned:

Very nice, Matt; Crittenden has done themselves proud.

One thing, though: are you still going to buy that extraordinary bespoke Rubinacci tailored clothing, iammatt?

I dearly and sincerely hope so as Rubinacci's extraordinary bespoke tailored clothing still looks best on you, IMO.
post #20 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
I am going to have to give this silhouette a price-point KA rating.

Meaning: Kicks Ass.

I like the roped shoulders...shows it's not what we typically associate with high end RTW Italian.

How's the fabric? At this price point, that is a sticky issue.

- B

I agree with you about the price/quality ratio. The fabric seems nice, but I don't know that much about fabrics, so I am the wrong person to ask. Perhaps Trevor could chime in.

I think it is an ideal work suit for somebody willing to spend a grand but no more, and without the interest in scouring ebay. I think this is especially the case because you can pick your fabrics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
Hard to wrap my head around seeing Matt in something other than his typical style. I don't see the coat so much as Matt.

Are the sleeves as full as they look? How about the armholes?

Despite the discount price, I'd find myself hesitant to pay so much for a suit made in China.

The sleeves are a little full, and the armholes are not high. They are not low, perhaps medium.

I wouldn't count it out because of China. Thread doesn't know where it is sewn, and everything looks to be neatly and finely finished.

It isn't my style, that is for sure. I probably wouldn't buy one myself, but I do see them as a great option for somebody looking for a work or interview suit. With all of the questions here on what to wear for an interview, a suit of this quality, in this price range seems to be in a certain sweet spot.

Sorry if my dashing good looks distracted you from the suit. I know they shine through, even when I cut off my head .
post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
Despite the discount price, I'd find myself hesitant to pay so much for a suit made in China.
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
With all of the questions here on what to wear for an interview, a suit of this quality, in this price range seems to be in a certain sweet spot.
Appreciate you being the guinea pig matt - thanks for the review and photos. It sounds like critt may well hit an 'objective' quality/retail price sweet spot. As the comments by Doc and others suggest, even in a generally quality-focused community, that is not identical to a sweet spot in the market. Generally, suits of a level where hand work is even an issue (usually 1500+ retail, often much more) are firmly luxury goods. On balance, I have a feeling Critt's lower retail price may be more of a commercial hamper than advantage in this market. My own totally subjective reaction to the cut is that the lapels and quarters look great, whereas the arms and armholes look like they could be better. But maybe I'm just comparing to what iammatt usually posts.
post #22 of 39
Overall, I think it looks to be cut a size too large or on the larger side. What I mean is, the sleeves seems to be too full and the armholes seem to start quite low. Also, the skirt seem to be flaring a bit too much in the unpinned version. Naturally RTW are made to fit a wide range of body types, but I'd rather see different models for different body types than an generic model to fit all.. Basically, I don't like it that much on you, but would probably consider, especially since you seem to be impressed with the construction and finish, it to be a better fitting coat on one with a bigger build.
post #23 of 39
Looks good.
post #24 of 39
Matt, thanks a lot for doing this and taking the time to post it.

I think it looks OK. But the sleeves look huge to me--full, or large diameter, not just a bit long. Larger than they need to be, and it leaves the wholel thing feeling just a trifle off. Not horribly so and not worse than most of the RTW stuff priced at or below this level. But not quite right either.
post #25 of 39
The mania for high armholes and trim sleeves is fashion. It's a feature of this decade. Fullness of the sleeves used to rank up there will roll of the lapel when men where taught how to distinguish the quality of a suit. There are good reasons to want fullness in the sleeve, so that will probably come back before too long. Unless these people are going for a chunk of the Polo market, and I don't think they are, then I doubt the armholes are a problem here--except for the individual buyer, who may want such things.
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
The mania for high armholes and trim sleeves is fashion. It's a feature of this decade. Fullness of the sleeves used to rank up there will roll of the lapel when men where taught how to distinguish the quality of a suit. There are good reasons to want fullness in the sleeve, so that will probably come back before too long.

Unless these people are going for a chunk of the Polo market, and I don't think they are, then I doubt the armholes are a problem here--except for the individual buyer, who may want such things.

I'm not sure I agree with this statement. A high armhole, perhaps counter-intuitively, allows for more arm movement. Thus, I don't see it as mere "fashion". For example if you were to raise your arm above your head the high-arm-hole-sleeve would be more likely to stay in place or closer relative to your wrist, whereas a lower-arm-hole-sleeve would ride up your arm. This is just to illustrate the point not to suggest that you buy a suit because of the way it looks while hailing a cab.

I also think a high arm hole is a pretty good indicator about the manufacturer or tailor's dedication to fit; do they want a suit that fits a wider range of body types hoping for more sales, or are they willing to sacrifice that for the possibility that the suit will look that much better on a smaller population of consumers.

For Matt's jacket I agree with many of the above comments that the sleeves seem too full and too low. It looks better pinned, and it seems surprising how little waist suppression there is unpinned.

It may be a great value at present, but if I were to offer a suggestion to the makers it would be to trim things up a bit. The people/consumers who will appreciate whatever handwork and fabric will also appreciate a more tailored fit.
post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
The mania for high armholes and trim sleeves is fashion. It's a feature of this decade.
If so, why do my 90 - 120 year old frock coats and morning coats have high arm holes? Ditto for quality RTW from the 1950s. Ditto for my modern bespoke coats.
post #28 of 39
High armholes are a feature of most suits made in the first half of the last century. It allows greater movement and from an aesthetic perspective it permits a longer line along the sides of the coat up to the armpits.
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by neyus View Post
from an aesthetic perspective it permits a longer line along the sides of the coat up to the armpits.

This definitely helps to make you look taller.
post #30 of 39
OK, ok, not the high armhole then, for all I know; but for sure there have been times when full sleeves were regarded as luxurious, stylish, fashionable, etc., and a hallmark of any luxury suit. We can have another thread on the history of arms and sleeves some other day. All I want to do is suggest that there's nothing wrong with the sleeves on this fine evening suit that Matt is modeling.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Crittendon - How does it fit