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Red Wing Gentleman's Traveler - Page 103

post #1531 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioImpemba View Post

 

Kiwi.

Really? You got that shine with Kiwi! How about the other RW boots that you linked -all Kiwi?

post #1532 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by seer View Post

Really? You got that shine with Kiwi! How about the other RW boots that you linked -all Kiwi?

 

Yessir - that's all I use. This is the glossiest I could get my 1K's:

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
post #1533 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioImpemba View Post

 

Yessir - that's all I use. This is the glossiest I could get my 1K's:

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

As a former Marine, I am impressed. And Kiwi does not get a lot of respect around here - Saphir is king, but your shines equal anything Saphir could produce! And my cobbler, who is an old timer, swears by Kiwi.  

post #1534 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by seer View Post

As a former Marine, I am impressed. And Kiwi does not get a lot of respect around here - Saphir is king, but your shines equal anything Saphir could produce! And my cobbler, who is an old timer, swears by Kiwi.  

 

Thanks! Appreciate the kind words.

 

From what I've gathered on here, some have alluded to the fact you can get equal shine to Saphir out of lesser products like Kiwi, only it will require a lot more effort and/or technique. I've been meaning to buy some Saphir to see for myself.

post #1535 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioImpemba View Post

 

Thanks! Appreciate the kind words.

 

From what I've gathered on here, some have alluded to the fact you can get equal shine to Saphir out of lesser products like Kiwi, only it will require a lot more effort and/or technique. I've been meaning to buy some Saphir to see for myself.

Do you mind sharing your technique?

post #1536 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by seer View Post

Do you mind sharing your technique?

The techniques tend to be pretty much the same for the standard spit and polish

There's pretty good guides on this page - http://a-butler-for-all-occasions.co.uk/The_Butlers_Tips.php

The guide to 'shiny footwear' is what you want unless you have stiff leather and want to go OTT and do the 'beeswax' guardsman ammo boot
post #1537 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by seer View Post

Do you mind sharing your technique?

 

Certainly.

 

I followed this technique picked up in the Shoe Care thread, and it worked great:

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JapanAlex01 View Post

I discovered, that all this 'one drop of water' thing, when trying to create a mirror shine, is rubbish! I soak the cloth under water, ring it out completely, then apply a small amount of polish (as usual). It'll start, to make those rings--**it'll look like those brushed metal tables you get at restaurants. Just do this a couple to a few times with new parts of the cloth each time. Repeat the whole process--soaking and all--with the other shoe.

 

1. Use cloth/tshirt/rag, soak it in a bowl/cup of water, ring it out so it's only damp, not dripping

2. Make sure you add some water to the tin of Kiwi so the wax is moist and the cloth glides around it easily to pick up wax

3. Apply wax generously and with a circular motion (I usually wrap one or two fingers with the cloth)

4. Continue to do the circular motion until most of the wax is on the shoe and the rag begins to dry! I used to just swirl it on, let it dry, then buff. Instead, you skip the drying portion and go straight from apply into buffing. This is another tip I learned in the Shoe thread that helped.

5. Do this about 1-3 more times, using less wax and less pressure as you build layers. It takes some practice and touch to get it down. Keep trying until you get it. If your shine goes backwards, just add another layer with less wax and more moisture so that you are gliding the cloth over the waxy layer. The wax will sort of "cure" and harden and it should start to feel like a freshly waxed car.

 

Hopefully this helps somewhat! Just practice until you find a technique that works best for you.

 

I was very surprised how nicely the Copper R&T leather shined up with some elbow grease. The Featherstone takes a shine very easily and beautifully. Both shine up better than CXL, at least with my technique/used products, which made me appreciate Red Wing more.

 

Worn pics:

2904 (Click to show)

Beckman - yes I BADLY need to change the laces to leather - apologize for being a clown (Click to show)

post #1538 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioImpemba View Post

 

Certainly.

 

I followed this technique picked up in the Shoe Care thread, and it worked great:

 

 

 

1. Use cloth/tshirt/rag, soak it in a bowl/cup of water, ring it out so it's only damp, not dripping

2. Make sure you add some water to the tin of Kiwi so the wax is moist and the cloth glides around it easily to pick up wax

3. Apply wax generously and with a circular motion (I usually wrap one or two fingers with the cloth)

4. Continue to do the circular motion until most of the wax is on the shoe and the rag begins to dry! I used to just swirl it on, let it dry, then buff. Instead, you skip the drying portion and go straight from apply into buffing. This is another tip I learned in the Shoe thread that helped.

5. Do this about 1-3 more times, using less wax and less pressure as you build layers. It takes some practice and touch to get it down. Keep trying until you get it. If your shine goes backwards, just add another layer with less wax and more moisture so that you are gliding the cloth over the waxy layer. The wax will sort of "cure" and harden and it should start to feel like a freshly waxed car.

 

Hopefully this helps somewhat! Just practice until you find a technique that works best for you.

 

I was very surprised how nicely the Copper R&T leather shined up with some elbow grease. The Featherstone takes a shine very easily and beautifully. Both shine up better than CXL, at least with my technique/used products, which made me appreciate Red Wing more.

 

 

 

Thanks so much, this reminds me of how we used to spit shine our shoes/boots in the Corps - but that was 40 years ago. I will give this a try!

post #1539 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by milw50717 View Post


The techniques tend to be pretty much the same for the standard spit and polish
There's pretty good guides on this page - http://a-butler-for-all-occasions.co.uk/The_Butlers_Tips.php
The guide to 'shiny footwear' is what you want unless you have stiff leather and want to go OTT and do the 'beeswax' guardsman ammo boot

Thanks, I will check it out...

post #1540 of 1864
This is probably a question that's been answered somewhere in this thread already, and if so, I apologize in advance. Is the Beckman and the Gentleman Traveler the same shoe? I can't seem to find the GT anywhere anymore, and searches for this on Amazon on the like bring up the Beckman. Some light reading in this thread seems to use the two names interchangeably as well?

Thanks.
post #1541 of 1864

Yes, one was the name used in the US, one the name used in Europe. Something like that.

post #1542 of 1864
GT was the earlier model using a different leather if I'm not wrong. Chromexcel to be exact?

The Beckman series uses the Featherstone leather.
post #1543 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeeeey View Post

GT was the earlier model using a different leather if I'm not wrong. Chromexcel to be exact?
The Beckman series uses the Featherstone leather.

Yup, Gentleman Traveler model uses Chromexcel. It was later renamed to Beckman series, and used Red Wing's own Featherstone leather.

The original Gentleman Traveler was a collaboration between Red Wing and Horween, after they found out that they were both founded in 1905 (I read that on Nick Horween's blog). So I guess you can think of it as some anniversary/special edition. But since Red Wing has their own tannery, and given the number of shoes they sell worldwide, it makes more sense for them to use their own leather in the long run.
post #1544 of 1864
Not normally a boots person....

I just got a pair of Beckman 9011 and today is the first day of wearing/breaking in them. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

They do look a bit like clown shoes though ffffuuuu.gif

And yes, the breaking-in process is not that comfortable but bearable. crazy.gif
post #1545 of 1864
Quote:
Originally Posted by aussiejake View Post

Yes, one was the name used in the US, one the name used in Europe. Something like that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeeeey View Post

GT was the earlier model using a different leather if I'm not wrong. Chromexcel to be exact?
The Beckman series uses the Featherstone leather.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsekh View Post

Yup, Gentleman Traveler model uses Chromexcel. It was later renamed to Beckman series, and used Red Wing's own Featherstone leather.
The original Gentleman Traveler was a collaboration between Red Wing and Horween, after they found out that they were both founded in 1905 (I read that on Nick Horween's blog). So I guess you can think of it as some anniversary/special edition. But since Red Wing has their own tannery, and given the number of shoes they sell worldwide, it makes more sense for them to use their own leather in the long run.

Thanks for the info guys!
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