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Lengthing a suit jacket - Page 3

post #31 of 43
Correction: Tom Wolfe is a pretentious, prudish, invicibly stupid asshole. And a highly overrated writer too, though he has his points. The jacket is a fine length. If the suit was a body skimming Dolce and Gabbana, body conscious style suit or a classic Gieves and Hawkes or Huntsman model, I might advocate for a little longer jacket. But for anything else, I think that a shorter skirted style jacket looks better. Milanese jackets are generally shorter skirted, for example. The waist looks to be at the right height, and the sleeves seem the right length. I don't understand why so many men seem to be wearing jackets longer and longer. Don't they understand that puberty ends doesn't extend into their twenties and thirties? Or are they influenced by Sunday Morning Televangelist style?
post #32 of 43
Thread Starter 
Yeh i've noticed people wearing long jackets as well but this one was just shorter than the rest of mine, maybe i'm guilty of jackets that are to long.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
It's close.  It's wearable, but probably a 1/2" longer would be perfect.  Better to miss long than short here, in my opinion, however.  I like shorter jackets, but when it gets too short (and you are on the verge of that, if not already there), it look effeminite.
I agree -- I think it looks good. It might be a tad short, but what the hell. I think it might be possible to have jacket lengthened 1/2 inch. I have a jacket, bespoke, that I need to have lengthened a bit. I've had it for about 25 years, and it's a tad too short.
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Correction: Tom Wolfe is a pretentious, prudish, invicibly stupid asshole.  And a highly overrated writer too, though he has his points.
And if any of us doubted it, we doubt it no more, given his latest book and interviews, etc attendant to it.
post #35 of 43
This 'rule of thumb' is a personal one and it's just plain silly to tell people otherwise. What it's good for is that your hands are an excellent measuring stick that you never forget at home. Find the perfect length of a jacket, both by visual means and by the divide-by-two rule. Watch where the bottom of the jacket is in relation to your hands and make a note of it. I am a 5ft8 with relatively long (34.5) hands. The knucle of my thumb rule works for me but for somebody who takes 33' sleeves it would be 1.5 inch too short. What complicates matters further is that your perfect lenght depends both the cut and also on the your body type. People with short legs need shorter jackets. If you've got long legs you can go for a long version and look good. On topic, this jacket looks phukka to me and will even look better once the trousers have been taken in and put in their place. B
post #36 of 43
Bjorn, your HANDS are 34.5"... Good, Lord. That's the length of my entire arm.
post #37 of 43
sorry, I didn't know you were on a limited budget... if you were to have bought this suit new, the store's tailor would have made the bottonholes operational for no extra cost. he would if he wasn't a dick. he would do a good job if he wasn't an incompetent dick.
post #38 of 43
In re: Tom Wolfe. Why the vitriol?  The essay linked is clearly a joke, or at least a partial joke.  It is sociology.  Wolfe is poking fun at the foibles of those of us (himself, and myself, and most of us on this board, included) who obsess over "custom tailoring and the mania for the marginal differences that go into it."  People in glass houses, as they say ... As to the claim that he is an "asshole": I can only say that I have met him, and he is unfailingly charming and polite. As to the claim that he is a "pretentious, prudish, invicibly stupid asshole": well. He wears funny clothes, but he is far from pretentious. In fact, he regularly treats "earthy" subjects that any genuinely pretentious writer (which is to say, most living novelists) would not touch. He constantly makes fun of himself, his profession, his hometown, intellectuals, and the world around him. How is that pretentious? Also, he is not a prude. Far from it. A prude could not and would not write what he writes. He reports what he sees. If what he sees is lurid, he reports that. Wolfe is a classic 19th century novelist: he writes about "the way we live now." How is that prudish? And his knowledge and learning and intellect speak for themselves in his books.  It is simply not credible or serious to call him "invincibly stupid." "And a highly overrated writer too, though he has his points." This, I suppose, is a matter of taste. I happen to think that he is not rated highly enough.
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Bjorn, your HANDS are 34.5"... Good, Lord. That's the length of my entire arm.
Damn . I keep writing feet instead of legs and hands instead of arms. As you can probably tell, hands and arms share a common word in my language - same goes for feet and legs. B
post #40 of 43
Quote:
if you were to have bought this suit new, the store's tailor would have made the bottonholes operational for no extra cost. he would if he wasn't a dick. he would do a good job if he wasn't an incompetent dick.
Err... huh? "Dick"ness not withstanding, the making of functional buttonholes is not something to be entrusted to a "store tailor", especially on a suit on which it would be worth doing them. They require a considerable amount of skilled labor, and no one should expect to get them done for free, unless it is written into the price of the suit.
post #41 of 43
Quote:
Also, he is not a prude. Far from it. A prude could not and would not write what he writes. He reports what he sees. If what he sees is lurid, he reports that.
The other points, I'll admit, are arguable. However, the manner in which he fixates on lurid subject matter seems to me the essence of prudishness. And his habit of dressing in "disguise", as he himself has described it, while researching his latest book, marks him as a buffoon, if nothing else. Of course, he could be engaging in some form of performance art, imitating life imitating art imitating life.
post #42 of 43
Quote:
And his habit of dressing in "disguise", as he himself has described it, while researching his latest book, marks him as a buffoon, if nothing else.  Of course, he could be engaging in some form of performance art, imitating life imitating art imitating life.
Wolfe has a credible explanation for this.  He says that he learned when doing the research for Acid Test that it is a mistake to try to fit in.  He said, No one is so despised as a "weekend hipster."  Better to be yourself, stand out, revel in your outsider status, and let people volunteer information.  Most people are driven by what Wolfe calls "information compulsion": They like to talk, they like to talk about themselves, they like to reveal the intricacies of thier subcultures to outsiders, and they just basically like to explain things that they understand to people who don't understand.  Wolfe's clothes help him stand out as a true outsider. Of course, he also wears his outlandish clothes because he loves them.  He once recounted an anecdote about how Zola, doing research for Germinal, went to a French coal mine dressed in a frock coat, high stiff collar, and top hat.  Wolfe commented: "This appeals to me for reasons I won't delay you with." That said, I think that for all his research for Charlotte Simmons, Wolfe missed the real story of the modern American university.  But since I hope to write that myself, I will say no more.
post #43 of 43
Ah,c'mon guys,I think you're getting overly analytical.I personally think it looks fine.The main thing is it covers his ass.That's the one criterion Alan Flusser dictates.I would not even think twice if I saw him walking down the street.Besides,didn't you see the latest fashion forecasts,shorter is the look.On the flipside,remember when overly long was in?I had a Donna Karan wool crepe DB suit in 1998,I swear it hit mid thigh,like some sort of Edwardian mutation.Really horrible,and I'm 6'2".
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