or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Lengthing a suit jacket
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Lengthing a suit jacket - Page 2

post #16 of 43
trying to judge the length of a jacket by how it looks in relation to you thumb or hands is a total waste of time. I dont know who came up with that, but it makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. I will use my own body as an example. I am 6 ft tall, and I have 37.5" arms. I have very big hands, and long fingers. My legs are shorter than my torso. All of this results in my arms reaching very far down. If I were to judge the length of my jacket by my hands or arms, I would be wearing a jacket that is several inches too long, I would look silly. Other people might have the exact opposite problem.
post #17 of 43
Quote:
trying to judge the length of a jacket by how it looks in relation to you thumb or hands is a total waste of time.  I dont know who came up with that, but it makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.   I will use my own body as an example.  I am 6 ft tall, and I have 37.5" arms.  I have very big hands, and long fingers.  My legs are shorter than my torso.  All of this results in my arms reaching very far down.  If I were to judge the length of my jacket by my hands or arms, I would be wearing a jacket that is several inches too long, I would look silly.  Other people might have the exact opposite problem.
Phil, You point out a very specific, very real problem a lot of inexperienced shoppers are going to have: most salespeople do not know how to tell you what is correct specificially for your body. In general, salespeople do not perceive individuals. They will tell you the length of a jacket is determined by its relation to your thumb, and they will tug the jacket away from your chest and say, "See, perfect fit." All meaningless, unhelpful obfuscation. I think this: go to a good tailor and listen very closely and take notes as he fits you for a suit he is going to make for you. Not a template. Not something off the rack. Not something that exists. But something specifically designed for your body. Learn why he makes the choices he makes for you. If one were to do this, then one would know what--in an ideal setting--fits and looks best on their particular body. With this knowledge (the best weapon against ignorance, BTW), return to your RTW stores and judge everything you try on based on the criteria established by your trusted tailor. You will know the correct jacket length for you. The right arm length for you. The right waist suppression for you. Et cetera.
post #18 of 43
Alexis- all good points. Experience is really the best weapon you have. After having many suits made over the past 10 years, I can tell in an instant if a suit I put on in a store fits. If you are armed with information and knowledge, the salesman is irrelevant. A man should know all of his relevant measurements by heart, or have them on a piece of paper when you go to a store. If you know you like a 33" coat, ask the salesman for a tape measure to check the one you are trying on. The sad truth is most salesman work on commission, they are motivated to sell you a suit, whether it fits well or not. Its really your responsibility to judge your own fit and demand it from the salesman helping you.
post #19 of 43
Thread Starter 
Well the suit is unfinished right now and am getting the sleeves shortened, and my right arm is just bent alittle more and it wasn't a straight on angle, no one was home to take the picture so i had to use the auto timer. I will get a full shot today. Also the pants are to big cause i haven't had them taken in yet. nik
post #20 of 43
It may not feel perfect, but from the pics (as near as I can tell), it's within the margin of error. It looks fine, and I wouldn't worry about the jacket being off by 1/2"...(Hope I don't get shunned for being so cavalier about fit)
post #21 of 43
Thread Starter 
Ok here is better pics, i hope these are what you ment. And Alexis what are the advantages of working button holes?
post #22 of 43
I think it looks good. Do not cut working buttonholes on that suit. You'd be paying almost as much for the button holes as you would for the suit. That would be patently ridiculous to do. And, anyways, working buttonholes are very risky. I have seen them done really badly and if the sleeve length gets screwed up somehow you are in a mess.
post #23 of 43
Thread Starter 
Whats the difference between working button holes and umm i guess non working button holes? Why would i want them etc. etc.
post #24 of 43
I think it looks fine.
post #25 of 43
Huh? The difference between "nonworking" and "working" buttonholes? Well, working buttonholes "work" of course -- you can literally unbutton the sleeve at the point the button goes into the buttonhole. You wouldn't want them on this suit because it costs about $100 to have them done.
post #26 of 43
Thread Starter 
But whats the advantage really?  Do they look better or are they classier?  I don't really see how being able to unbotton your sleeves is that big of an advantage.
post #27 of 43
Hold on to that confusion, Demeis. It will save you much money. There is almost no functional advantage to working buttonholes.
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Hold on to that confusion, Demeis.  It will save you much money. There is almost no functional advantage to working buttonholes.
I know there are many here who would disagree. If you want to save the money, sham buttons are fine, but do some reading on the other posts here (there are MANY on this topic) and you might start to feel a bit differently. Also, read this by Tom Wolfe: http://www.jderickson.com/clothing/secretvice.html
post #29 of 43
Thread Starter 
OK just wanted to clear that up. Most likely i'm not going to get them if they are $100 or around their. I'm a college student with limited income so i could do a lot with $100. Thanks for suggesting them maybe some day...sigh
post #30 of 43
Tom Wolfe is an asshole. Great (albeit slightly depressing) read.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Lengthing a suit jacket