or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Striped Ties
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Striped Ties

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Does anyone wonder about striped ties and which direction the stripes run? Up on the right down to the left makes sense to me because this would follow the concept of the button side of the suit(right) being underneath the button hole side(left) . If the stripes run the other way, it doesn't look off but I rather have stripes running in the former rather then the latter direction.
post #2 of 9
American ties (if you're facing one) point from the right shoulder while British ties point from the left shoulder. I stole the following from a web site:
Quote:
It is true that the "Rep Stripe" tie is different in Europe. I believe that it is a military uniform influence. The "American Rep Stripe" will cross the chest diagonally with the stripes pointing from the right shoulder. The "European Rep Stripe" crosses the chest with the stripes pointing from left shoulder. If a riffle were to be carried in sling strapped over the shoulder, the American soldier would carry his weapon over the right shoulder. The European military sling would carry over the left shoulder with the strap crossing the heart. American riffles eject shell casings to the right and the European riffle ejects shell casings to the left. American military - considering people are mostly right handed - have and easier access and feel for the rifle carried over the right shoulder. In dress the uniform would flow better without converging stripes. I am sure if you view West Point or other officer photographs you'll see this. Before the turn of the twentieth century the British came to the conclusion that their soldiers were easy targets in bright uniform. With the issue of drab uniforms the only way to dress up with color and style was a uniquely bright striped tie, with each division or service adopting their own colors. Of course this spread across the Atlantic. Americans still were proud of taking the land from England would not be out done by the United kingdom in anyway. After all they British navy still controlled the high seas and much of the world. This was explained to me years ago and I cannot confirm the truth of this explanation but logically it makes since. At the turn of the century (last one - twentieth) neckties were very much part of military uniform. European, and American fashion was influenced by the dress code of service men. I hope this answers your question. Without time to check this as fact I can only piece together what I have read and what my father and other gentlemen have told me.
Sounds plausible to me.
post #3 of 9
Never thought about it before, but looking at my ties it's about half and half for which way they run. I'm not sure it makes much of a difference for me.
post #4 of 9
I would think that tie stripes that point to the left shoulder would best echo the arrangment of the lapels, since the left crosses over the right.  If you try it with a DB coat, you see that the stripes are parallel to the sweep of the longer lapel.  I've never really worried about it, myself. I seem to recall reading somewhere (Flusser?) that the stripe direction was deliberately reversed when English regimental stripe ties were first marketed in America, on the theory that a mirror image would be less offensive to the Brits than a direct copy. I don't think there's an especially high level of consciousness in most parts of the US concerning these regimental patterns and the [im]propriety of wearing them, so I doubt you'd cause much of a fuss by wearing the stripes in the original/"correct" direction...I'd think twice about wearing an authentic reg. tie in the UK, though.
post #5 of 9
With the rep ties I think the direction has to do with if you have been engaged in combat.  If you have been in combat you get to change the direction.  Sort of like the old statue thing. If you died in combat your statue got to ride on a horse with legs up in the air or something. One of those things that few, if any are paying attention to these days. Next people will want to start dressing like prison thugs - what. that already happened??...
post #6 of 9
Quote:
With the rep ties I think the direction has to do with if you have been engaged in combat. If you have been in combat you get to change the direction. Sort of like the old statue thing. If you died in combat your statue got to ride on a horse with legs up in the air or something. One of those things that few, if any are paying attention to these days. Next people will want to start dressing like prison thugs - what. that already happened??...
In almost 30 years with HM Forces I have never heard of stripes being reversed to show the wearer had been in combat. The stripes on regimental and service ties only ever go in one direction - the original British one. The statue story is false, as described here. I can assure you that wearing a tie to which you are not entitled remains a solecism in the UK. Those of us who have earned the right, through service, to wear one, consider it deeply insulting.
post #7 of 9
Where do I start in addressing the misstatements we have here? It's daunting to know where to begin. 1. British regimental ties generally but not always slant "toward the heart", the opposite of many but not all American regimental stripe ties. Bear in mind that there are numerous ties of British professional associations, clans, and other affinity groups that involve patterns other than stripes. 2. In the United States military, those who have served in an active theater wear their decorations and campaign insignia over the left breast, as opposed to the right, with the exception of certain specific decorations such as the CMOH. There is to the best of my knowledge no change in tie stripe direction that matches this custom. 3. All military bolt-action rifles of this century eject to the right, regardless of national origin. This includes the US 1903 Springfield and 1917 Enfield, the ubiquitous 1898 Mauser, the British SMLE, the French Lebel, the Swiss Schmidt Rubin, the Soviet Mosin-Nagant, and the Japanese Arisaka Type 38 and Type 99 rifles. Unsurprisingly, engineers build weapons to function best for 88% of the population.
post #8 of 9
Quote:
I can assure you that wearing a tie to which you are not entitled remains a solecism in the UK. Those of us who have earned the right, through service, to wear one, consider it deeply insulting.
This is an error that would easily be found out, as every serviceman in the British Armed Forces knows what his Regimental/Corps/Service colours are (and many of the others too) and what the tie is like, even if they never wear it themselves. If they see their Regimental tie being worn by someone in a non military setting they will invariably introduce themselves and mention that they noticed the tie. This is good manners and comradeship and I for one would be disappointed if a member or former member did not introduce themselves upon noticing my tie. To discover that the person in question had no entitlement to wear said tie is considered tantamount to wearing medals you are not entitled to. Some more forceful people would "insist" that you remove it immediately. On a lighter note this reminds me of an old "Goon Show" (1950's BBC radio comedy show) sketch, where Spike Milligan's character is at a job interview- Interviewer "I notice that you are wearing a Cambridge tie" SM, in suitably stupid voice "Yes I am" Interviewer, impressed "So I take it you went to Cambridge then?" SM "Yes I did" Interviewer  "So what did you do in Cambridge" SM "I bought a tie" Sorry, I enjoyed it.
post #9 of 9
Quote:
All military bolt-action rifles of this century eject to the right, regardless of national origin. This includes the US 1903 Springfield and 1917 Enfield, the ubiquitous 1898 Mauser, the British SMLE, the French Lebel, the Swiss Schmidt Rubin, the Soviet Mosin-Nagant, and the Japanese Arisaka Type 38 and Type 99 rifles. Unsurprisingly, engineers build weapons to function best for 88% of the population.
You know, I should have known that. I've fired Lee-Enfield Mk.1's more times than I can count. That British/Continental rifles eject casings opposite their American counterparts is simply absurd. I should be scourged for this.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Striped Ties