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Swimming - Page 4

post #46 of 66
I guess on average, capped swimmers know what they're doing. It's like you dont go shave your legs when you don't know how to cycle properly. I guess I feel like it goes with the culture. But you're right, in this case, it is your fucked up hair if not.
post #47 of 66
Blonde hair will get fucked up, darker hair, wont notice so much. I mean, chlorine isnt good for it, but stick the odd oil treatment in there, no one will know. I am sure you will live through it.

Blondes get green hair from too much chlorine though, I went to school with a lot of otherwise-hot greenheaded swimmer girls. So if you happen to be fair, then, beware.

That rhymes
post #48 of 66
ugh i'm tired. ran to the pool, swam and ran back
post #49 of 66
These are all the reasons I don't go to public swimming pools. Should i wear a cap? No we should all swim through your floating hair. Should I put some product in my hair? No you should take a fuking shower before and not put any lotions or gels, I might not like them.
Public swimming pools are soups with human meatballs.
post #50 of 66
bumpy bump

Anyone out there learned to swim as an adult?

I am one of them and I have to say. WTF. I have already asked others and apparently my problem is typical and simply is dismissed with "just practice, practice"

I am always out of breath. It's onne lap and I am heaving and my heart rat is up. Obviously I notice I am doing something wrong when I notice the 60+ year old couple in the lap lanes have been leisurely lap swimming for the past 20 minutes.

I have seen youtube video techniques on breathing, now I have tried some and still nothing.

How long does this learning curve take?

Do you really "put your ear on your should and breathe" I suck in more water...

Hurray for back stroke, though it is choppy and ugly at least I feel like I am breathing.
post #51 of 66
Relax, bilateral breathing, every third stroke
post #52 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

bumpy bump
Anyone out there learned to swim as an adult?
I am one of them and I have to say. WTF. I have already asked others and apparently my problem is typical and simply is dismissed with "just practice, practice"
I am always out of breath. It's onne lap and I am heaving and my heart rat is up. Obviously I notice I am doing something wrong when I notice the 60+ year old couple in the lap lanes have been leisurely lap swimming for the past 20 minutes.
I have seen youtube video techniques on breathing, now I have tried some and still nothing.
How long does this learning curve take?
Do you really "put your ear on your should and breathe" I suck in more water...
Hurray for back stroke, though it is choppy and ugly at least I feel like I am breathing.


I did - I knew how to doggy paddle, basically, but not really swim. I took lessons with my kids swimming teacher, and it was a bitch in the begining, I don't think that I did more than 20-25 lessons, now I can swim a mile without thinking about it. I don't do butteryfly, though.
post #53 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

bumpy bump
Anyone out there learned to swim as an adult?
I am one of them and I have to say. WTF. I have already asked others and apparently my problem is typical and simply is dismissed with "just practice, practice"
I am always out of breath. It's onne lap and I am heaving and my heart rat is up. Obviously I notice I am doing something wrong when I notice the 60+ year old couple in the lap lanes have been leisurely lap swimming for the past 20 minutes.
I have seen youtube video techniques on breathing, now I have tried some and still nothing.
How long does this learning curve take?
Do you really "put your ear on your should and breathe" I suck in more water...
Hurray for back stroke, though it is choppy and ugly at least I feel like I am breathing.
My father learned as an adult in the Air Force -- we still giggle about the rigidity of his stroke. You are probably tensing up a lot of muscles unnecessarily due to anxiety, which is adding to rapid exhaustion.

You might try breaststroke, which is easier for breathing. Sidestroke and sculling/finning are even better. Also to get the rhythm of breathing, bobbing is handy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SUPER K View Post

Relax, bilateral breathing, every third stroke

You know, if you are going to be sarcastic, a smiley might be in order. ffffuuuu.gif
post #54 of 66
I have noticed an improvement being at the pool everyday for last ten days, so I am at least confident I may improve with more practice.

my legs are getting worked out probably like never before, so I plan to keep conditioning my kicking. Swimming has shown me I am not as in shape as I hoped I was.

It seems to a certain degree, lap swimming requires some anaerobic conditioning, which I have zero experience with since all my land excersices let me heave and puff till my hearts and lungs content.

I have been working on relaxing and simply "letting go" of my breath.
post #55 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

bumpy bump
Anyone out there learned to swim as an adult?
I am one of them and I have to say. WTF. I have already asked others and apparently my problem is typical and simply is dismissed with "just practice, practice"
I am always out of breath. It's onne lap and I am heaving and my heart rat is up. Obviously I notice I am doing something wrong when I notice the 60+ year old couple in the lap lanes have been leisurely lap swimming for the past 20 minutes.
I have seen youtube video techniques on breathing, now I have tried some and still nothing.
How long does this learning curve take?
Do you really "put your ear on your should and breathe" I suck in more water...
Hurray for back stroke, though it is choppy and ugly at least I feel like I am breathing.


Yeah, I'm 41 and I just learned how to swim / took lessons last summer. And, yes, it's just practice. It took me about 4-6 weeks of swimming about 3x's per week to get up past 12 laps. I could do 1 lap then have to stop. Then a couple of days later I could do 3 laps and have to stop. Once I hit 12 laps, that seemed to be the breaking point and I could just keep swimming after that and an acquaintance at the pool who turned out to be a high school swim instructor said my progress sounded about normal.
post #56 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bringusingoodale View Post

I have noticed an improvement being at the pool everyday for last ten days, so I am at least confident I may improve with more practice.
my legs are getting worked out probably like never before, so I plan to keep conditioning my kicking. Swimming has shown me I am not as in shape as I hoped I was.
It seems to a certain degree, lap swimming requires some anaerobic conditioning, which I have zero experience with since all my land excersices let me heave and puff till my hearts and lungs content.
I have been working on relaxing and simply "letting go" of my breath.

I feel your pain brother. I learned how to swim a few months ago, I took a few private lessons and now feel pretty comfortable with my freestyle stroke but it's a constant struggle to add distance. I tried the every 3rd stroke breathing at first and noticed my biggest improvements when I switched to every 2 strokes and started breathing on 1 side the whole time.

It's all about being relaxed which is the hardest part when you learn as an adult, every time the floor drops for the deep end I get a little tense. I've watched a few of the Total Immersion vids on youtube as well as their dvd, there are some good tips and drills on there, but the main thing is just getting comfortable in the water.
post #57 of 66
i have been teaching swimming lessons to people of all ages - i have 10 years of experience between group and private lessons as well as teaching lifeguarding, triathlon and stroke improvement classes. i now own and operate a private swim school. what everyone has been saying about being tense is 100% correct. swimming is far more about learning new motor patterns and being comfortable in the water than it is overall fitness. obviously, fitness may be a limiting factor but if you are an adult learner i promise you technique is your number 1 barrier. my observations on how to correct front crawl...

to improve bilateral breathing practice side glides on each side. the arm closest to the bottom should be fully outstretched, ear down to the shoulder. the other arm should be down at your side. ensure your ear being held to the shoulder stays in the pool and your head is neutral; do not force or tilt your head above the water. this will compromise your body position. instead, roll backwards slightly. a cue that helps is letting yourself sink - this will ensure your body position is optimal in the water and forces you to roll slightly backwards to breathe as opposed to tilting your head up on an angle. keeping your head in a neutral position will ensure your legs stay balanced near the surface. then, kick like hell. with practice, you should be able to do 10m side glide on either side - this is sufficient for bilateral breathing purposes.

incorporate this into a drill with a kickboard. front glide (face in, both hands on the flutterboard) to side glide. do not move your arms constantly as if you were doing front crawl. instead, focus on bringing one arm down to your side as you roll sideways to breathe. ensure you breathe to opposite sides. you should have a full exhalation as you do your front glide before you roll out to your side. do not exhale when you come up to breathe, only inhale - you should have exhaled fully underwater. ensure you are rolling your body from the hips and not lifting your head. tuck your chin in farther during your front glide if you are having trouble keeping your ear in the water when you breathe; this ensures your head and neck will be in a neutral position when you roll. ensure you have a strong overarm recovery as you return to the front glide position and do not look forward. take away the kickboard when you are able to complete this for several laps. make sure you don't spend a lot of time breathing. side glides are hard as hell and your body wants to be on its front. the longer you spend breathing, the more tired you will be.

as far as comfort goes, practice front, back, and rollover floats and glides. do glides with and without kicking. practice letting yourself sink to the bottom (exhale) and float up again. attempt to transfer your weight - ie, do a handstand. the more directions you can move in the water, the stronger your breath control will be. the reason kids are kicking your ass all over the pool is because they play in it all day long - they know how to catch their breath, how to roll over, how to make it to the side when they are tired, etc. spend some time fucking around, diving for rings and whatnot. practice treading, jumping in and treading, jumping in and sinking to the bottom and pushing yourself to the surface... etc. multidirectional movement is key. front crawl is a very, very limited stroke and is not practical for leisure swimming which is the #1 way you will become comfortable in the water.
post #58 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarude View Post

i have been teaching swimming lessons to people of all ages - i have 10 years of experience between group and private lessons as well as teaching lifeguarding, triathlon and stroke improvement classes. i now own and operate a private swim school. what everyone has been saying about being tense is 100% correct. swimming is far more about learning new motor patterns and being comfortable in the water than it is overall fitness. obviously, fitness may be a limiting factor but if you are an adult learner i promise you technique is your number 1 barrier. my observations on how to correct front crawl...
to improve bilateral breathing practice side glides on each side. the arm closest to the bottom should be fully outstretched, ear down to the shoulder. the other arm should be down at your side. ensure your ear being held to the shoulder stays in the pool and your head is neutral; do not force or tilt your head above the water. this will compromise your body position. instead, roll backwards slightly. a cue that helps is letting yourself sink - this will ensure your body position is optimal in the water and forces you to roll slightly backwards to breathe as opposed to tilting your head up on an angle. keeping your head in a neutral position will ensure your legs stay balanced near the surface. then, kick like hell. with practice, you should be able to do 10m side glide on either side - this is sufficient for bilateral breathing purposes.
incorporate this into a drill with a kickboard. front glide (face in, both hands on the flutterboard) to side glide. do not move your arms constantly as if you were doing front crawl. instead, focus on bringing one arm down to your side as you roll sideways to breathe. ensure you breathe to opposite sides. you should have a full exhalation as you do your front glide before you roll out to your side. do not exhale when you come up to breathe, only inhale - you should have exhaled fully underwater. ensure you are rolling your body from the hips and not lifting your head. tuck your chin in farther during your front glide if you are having trouble keeping your ear in the water when you breathe; this ensures your head and neck will be in a neutral position when you roll. ensure you have a strong overarm recovery as you return to the front glide position and do not look forward. take away the kickboard when you are able to complete this for several laps. make sure you don't spend a lot of time breathing. side glides are hard as hell and your body wants to be on its front. the longer you spend breathing, the more tired you will be.
as far as comfort goes, practice front, back, and rollover floats and glides. do glides with and without kicking. practice letting yourself sink to the bottom (exhale) and float up again. attempt to transfer your weight - ie, do a handstand. the more directions you can move in the water, the stronger your breath control will be. the reason kids are kicking your ass all over the pool is because they play in it all day long - they know how to catch their breath, how to roll over, how to make it to the side when they are tired, etc. spend some time fucking around, diving for rings and whatnot. practice treading, jumping in and treading, jumping in and sinking to the bottom and pushing yourself to the surface... etc. multidirectional movement is key. front crawl is a very, very limited stroke and is not practical for leisure swimming which is the #1 way you will become comfortable in the water.



Awesome. I've been struggling with breathing too and will try this tomorrow. Up until now I've been just brute forcing it and essentially holding my breath with 2 gasps of air a lap that don't seem to give me any oxygen. Any other wisdom you feel like dropping, we're all ears
post #59 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13 View Post



Yeah, I'm 41 and I just learned how to swim / took lessons last summer. And, yes, it's just practice. It took me about 4-6 weeks of swimming about 3x's per week to get up past 12 laps. I could do 1 lap then have to stop. Then a couple of days later I could do 3 laps and have to stop. Once I hit 12 laps, that seemed to be the breaking point and I could just keep swimming after that and an acquaintance at the pool who turned out to be a high school swim instructor said my progress sounded about normal.
I may be a littler slower at this than I had hoped. I still can't do more than 2 laps and it's been over a month.


Good stuff jarude. Thanks.

I started doing more playing around and less worried about lap swimming. I notice I actually swim further with less exhaustion--by which I mean I feel like I catch my breath by simply doing side glides like you described and just holding out one arm and kicking and switching arms to breath... kind of hard to describe, basically just practicing kicking without kick board. It's when I want to start doing what I see everyone else do the front crawl or freestyle that I can't catch my breath.

I notice it really is about being relaxed and just plain getting feel for water, which is easier said than done. I went 5 days without practice or pool, and wow, I noticed a difference, just when I thought I wouldn't feel clumsy anymore I had to acclimate again to being in water. I will stay committed this summer, hopefully I find a year round pool and I muster up will to keep practicing at least once a week.

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post #60 of 66
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