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Swimming - Page 2

post #16 of 66
Thread Starter 
Seriously, if anyone has good 60 minute workout ideas, please post them here.

Thanks.
post #17 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Anybody here a regular swimmer? What do you do, and how often? I've been going to a pool with a "coach" (really just a guy who writes a workout on a dry erase board and then sits on a bench and plays with his iPhone). I always do what he writes out, but at the end of this week, his services are not going to be available. Averaging about 2,500 yards per day, three days a week. I want to keep it up but without "coach" I fear I will feel lost and abandoned.
How many strokes are you familiar with? Do you tread water? You can try front crawl, head up front crawl, breast, frog legs only, stroke only, flutter kick only, arms only, butterfly, dolphin swim (like butterfly without the arms), backstroke, scissor kick x2 (1 each side) and underwater laps for 1-2 laps each one after another. Then tread water from one side of the pool to the other. Or you may consider speed trials. Or the 1000m challenge (should take around 20 minutes) or the 2000m challenge (should take around 40-60 minutes). You can always google for lifeguard swimming training routines (no need to get hardcore or anything) or pm me if you want to know what we did for lifeguard pool training.
post #18 of 66
Thread Starter 
The way "coach" does it, we do swim (free), kick (with a board), pull (with a buoy) and stroke (I always do back). That's it.
post #19 of 66
By far the worst thing about swimming alone is how boring it can be. A couple things I like to do to relieve the monotony:

1 - Pyramid, i.e. 50, 100, 150, 200, 200, 150, 100, 50. Makes 1000 yds feel like nothing for some reason. Going up to 250 gives you 1500.

2 - Intervals, maybe 50 seconds per 50 yd free. Swim down and back (assuming short course) at a good pace, ca. 35-40 secs, rest for 15-10, start again. x10. There's another 500 yds.

3 - Boring, but I like to do some 400s or 200s

Add kicking and you're at 2500. It's great exercise.
post #20 of 66
I'd first get someone to ensure you have proper technique instead of writing you workouts. You can look those up online.
post #21 of 66
I was an All-American in the 100 breast in high school, but I hated practicing. The best thing you can do for a swimming workout is to get a partner of similar speed and race them. Racing is the only fun thing about swimming.


Workout:
Warmup: 6-1-1 (600 free, 100 kick, 100 scull or pull)
Set 1: 4x200 (alternate 100 free 100 back)
Set 2: 6x100 (50 sprint 50 slower)
Set 3: 200 kick (25 sprint 25 slower)
Warmdown: 100 free or back


I'd recommend getting some professional stroke help, as well. Swimming is a lot more fun when you can do IMs and have four strokes to choose from.
post #22 of 66
I'd agree with Socal - you should be able to go online and get a bunch of varied workouts within your range. And you should be able to find a coach that push you a bit. I think that's more important than just writing out a workout. I'd want the coach to gradually increase difficulty and to push me to work harder intervals and keep my intensity high.
post #23 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal2NYC View Post
I'd first get someone to ensure you have proper technique instead of writing you workouts.

Does technique really matter that much if you are not trying to win races or improve your time?
post #24 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Does technique really matter that much if you are not trying to win races or improve your time?
Well, if you really want to get the most out of your workout and avoid injuries, I'd say so. Good technique can help maximize stroke/water displacement, oxygen intake, lung capacity, stamina, etc... and that's good for everything, not just your times. It's true with just about everything fitness related. My gym has Infinity Wave pools, I can't recommend them enough. It will keep you from getting bored if you have the option available to you.
post #25 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Does technique really matter that much if you are not trying to win races or improve your time?

Yes, because I doubt you want to screw up your shoulders.
post #26 of 66
Manton,
Join a swim club or buy (or borrow) a book. Something like this:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/193...WP0E9KJR13DYCF
post #27 of 66
Would you go to the gym and use the equipment with the chair too high or too short or grip the bar at the wrong spot?

I'm sure your pool has a Master's swim that you could eventually join at some point. What's your base?
post #28 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal2NYC View Post
Would you go to the gym and use the equipment with the chair too high or too short or grip the bar at the wrong spot?
Would I do that? Probably.

But what I am really wondering is if there are any health benefits to getting the strokes right, like a competetive swimmer. I am not interested in competition and not really even interested in improving my times. It's all about the health for me.

Quote:
I'm sure your pool has a Master's swim that you could eventually join at some point.
Actually, I don't think they do. To the extent that they do, I fear I am already in it.

Quote:
What's your base?
I don't understand whay you're asking.
post #29 of 66
I thought one of the advantages of swimming was that you didn't screw up your body like with running. if Manton has been doing this for a while, and can swim for a solid hour, is there really risk of him damaging his joints if he keeps doing what he has been doing?
post #30 of 66
I swam competetively in high school and you can definitely injure your shoulders swimming. Maybe not so likely swimming 7500 yds a week vs. 50K to 60K, as cometetive swimmers do.
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