or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › charles tyrwhitt
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

charles tyrwhitt

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
what is the general opinion of this brand with respect to quality?
post #2 of 34
You will find lots and lots of threads on this topic if you do a search. Most of the threads involve comparison of Tyrwhitt with other "Jermyn St" (either genuine or self-styled) shirtmakers such as TM Lewin and Thomas Pink. I have a few Tyrwhitt shirts and, having bought them on sale, I am quite happy with them. I do find the collars to be a bit too stiff, though - so stiff, in fact, that you hardly need to use collar stiffeners. I would not pay full price for Tyrwhitt shirts and I would not buy my basic shirts (ie white, blue, gingham check) from them, as other brands such as Harvie and Hudson and Coles do such shirts much better for not too much more money. I do like some of Tyrwhitt's patterns, though, and so they are the sort of shirts that I will sometimes pick up on sale. With regard to shoes, they also should only be purchased on deep discount. As far as I am aware, Tyrwhitt shoes are mostly manufactured by Loake. However, you can get the original Loake models far more cheaply from online merchants such as Pediware or Herring Shoes. Generally, I would only buy Tyrwhitt shoes at the end of season sale when prices drop by 40-50% or more. I don't have any experience with their suits, but again if you do a search you should find some discussion of their suit qualities. As the suits have working buttonholes you need to consider whether it is worth your while to have the sleeve length adjusted if Tyrwhitt's standard sleeve length does not work for you. I hope that this helps.
post #3 of 34
Yeah, I have to second that it's you'll find their stuff on sale pretty readily. It's hard to justify paying full price for something that goes on sale often. The ties are nice. I picked up one at Bloomingdales for $20.
post #4 of 34
I like 'em. But as was mentioned, I'd get them on sale. They compare favorably with Gieves & Hawkes and Turnbull & Asser. At least to mine.

They tried outsourcing to China several years ago and that didn't go over very well. Quality suffered and complaints were high.

The tag is plainly marked "Made in China" on these older shirts, so there is no mistake if you are looking for second-hand stuff or shirts that are NOS.

And yes, the collars are stiff, but I like that in a shirt. Pretty sure they are fused.
post #5 of 34
I think they're okay, a little too baggy off the rack. So if you're looking for a slim cut shirt, CT wouldn't be it. I bought one for $35 on sale and had to spend another $15 to get the sides taken in.
post #6 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mishon View Post
I think they're okay, a little too baggy off the rack. So if you're looking for a slim cut shirt, CT wouldn't be it. I bought one for $35 on sale and had to spend another $15 to get the sides taken in.

If you don't work in an office with Menopausal women, sometimes you need to get slim cut shirts that aren't too slim.
post #7 of 34
They offer a slim fit line so you don't look like you're wearing a bag. I know the feeling. Before I started order better clothes almost every OTR shirt I bought fit like a potato sack.

I've found that when ordering from them that I need to order the slim fit. However, ordering from G&H or T&A, all of their shirts fit me perfectly through the torso.

I'm not what I would consider skinny, just average. 42 chest and 34 waist. I don't know why American and some overseas clothes are cut for Joe six-pack with the 50 inch beer gut.
post #8 of 34
I find that the ones that fit like tents can be tailored to fit relatively slim. The fabric on one of the CT shirts I have is extremely nice - one of the best shirts I have.
post #9 of 34
Yes, their slim-fit is very nice.
post #10 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelE View Post
I've found that when ordering from them that I need to order the slim fit. However, ordering from G&H or T&A, all of their shirts fit me perfectly through the torso.
inch beer gut.

What exactly are G&H and T&A?
post #11 of 34
I assume that G&H is Gieves and Hawkes and that T&A is Turnbull and Asser. Other common shirtmaker abbreviations are Harvie and Hudson (H&H), Hilditch and Key (H&K), and New and Lingwood (N&L).
post #12 of 34
Gieves & Hawkes and Turnbull & Asser.

Savile Row. Or just "the Row"

London.
post #13 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
I assume that G&H is Gieves and Hawkes and that T&A is Turnbull and Asser.

Other common shirtmaker abbreviations are Harvie and Hudson (H&H), Hilditch and Key (H&K), and New and Lingwood (N&L).

Beat me by '' that much Chief!
post #14 of 34
good thing about CT is that there's no need to ever pay for retail, for there's always a sale going on.
post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by stickonatree View Post
good thing about CT is that there's no need to ever pay for retail, for there's always a sale going on.

Of couse there is. They advertise what they think it's worth and sell for what they can get for it.

I third to half of their inventory is always "on sale"

Makes you think you're getting a deal. Actually you are getting a pretty good deal for the quality and material at their "sale" prices. They would like you to think you are getting more for your dollar than you actually are, but you're getting exacty the fair market value at their sale prices.

For what I pay when I buy from them, I think I'm paying fair value for goods ordered.

Not exactly how I would run my advertising, but those that have been around awhile can see though it when they have the product on their backs.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › charles tyrwhitt