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Cigars - Page 4

post #46 of 9893
If you like hanging out at the bars in Tokyo, I would just start going to cigar bars. As you can imagine, there are a ton of them in the area and they will have a pretty good selection of the well known brands.

My favorites are mostly from Montecristo...pretty much any size.

Although it`s well made, I think the most over rated is Cohiba, but might as well give it a try since you can smoke the real stuff in Japan, but can`t in the U.S.
post #47 of 9893
Labelking, yes i do have a Zigarenbench or Cigar Holder...for when you want to rest it on the table.
iammatt, the party shorts are an amazing smoke. I do enjoy those little firecrackers.

Regards.
post #48 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post
If you like hanging out at the bars in Tokyo, I would just start going to cigar bars. As you can imagine, there are a ton of them in the area and they will have a pretty good selection of the well known brands.

This one's at the top of my list.

http://www.leconnaisseur.jp/shopguide/ginza.html

I've been there once to take a peek inside when they were full-up and my girlfriend complained that she didn't like the cigar smoke. I'll be paying them a visit this weekend.

Lots of bars have a humidor with a small selection, quite commonly Montecristo and Romeo y Julieta. Whether or not they store them well is anybody's guess.
post #49 of 9893
Pretty much everything that was said about cubans was spot on. If you are looking to smoke something now, I would search for some vintage cubans because they taste much better with at least 2-5 years behind them. Habanos offers a torpedo and robusto sampler which I definitely recommend if you are new to cubans or even cigars in general.

For Non cubans The Padron Anniversario series is fantastic. the 40th and 80th anniversaries are in my top 10 cigars of all time. Anything by Pepin Garcia is fantastic. He blends for Don Pepin, 601, Tatajue, Padilla, along with some other brands. I would recommend any of those.

For a milder smoke La Aruora makes some fantastic cigars. Any of their preferidos are great. For the beginner I would recommend the sapphire which uses a Connecticut shade wrapper.

If any of you need a site to buy authentic cubans, send me a pm. They have the cheapest prices on the internet by far and are 100% legit.
post #50 of 9893
Not to jack the thread or anything, but I've also started to get into cigars, but live in the States. What's the best non-cuban cigar I could get around here? Since I'm a noob, I don't want anything super heavy (or whatever the cigar vocab is) but wouldn't mind experimenting with a few.
post #51 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Not to jack the thread or anything, but I've also started to get into cigars, but live in the States. What's the best non-cuban cigar I could get around here? Since I'm a noob, I don't want anything super heavy (or whatever the cigar vocab is) but wouldn't mind experimenting with a few.

To me, the only non-Cubans that compare favorably to Cubans are Padron Anniversario, Ashton VSG, and Opus X. They are all horribly expensive. There are other good non Cuban cigars, but those are -- to my taste anyway -- "the best".
post #52 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
To me, the only non-Cubans that compare favorably to Cubans are Padron Anniversario, Ashton VSG, and Opus X. They are all horribly expensive. There are other good non Cuban cigars, but those are -- to my taste anyway -- "the best".

So...... basically in the <$20/stick category, I'm SOL?
post #53 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
So...... basically in the <$20/stick category, I'm SOL?

No, probably not. Arturo Fuentes (non-Opus) are quite good, as are Padron (non-Anniversario). I don't smoke much, so when I do I tend to splurge. But there are definitely some options out there at lower prices.
post #54 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red View Post
Thanks for the suggestion. Any particular cigars known for being tight or having other quality issues?

The few cigars I've smoked so far have gone quite well with single malts or cognacs, but my usual Saturday afternoon espresso would be a great excuse for a Montecristo #4.
The construction problem, as I understand it, is that after the Soviets left Cuba, there was not much money and they needed to make more, and fast. because of this they cut back on the fermentation time the tobacco got and started rolling cigars with tobacco that was slightly too wet. Wet cigars plug easily. Also, a lot of new rollers were put to work, so quality suffered. Contrary to common belief, the factorys each roll many different cigar shapes and brands. The old Partagas factory rolls a million different things, as do all of the others. Because of this, you can't say one brand is more consistent than the others. Some say Cohiba and Trinidad are better because they are double fermented, but I have had a lot of plugs from both. Nowadays, you should just be careful of long thin cigars. They are hard to roll, and very hand to roll in a way that allows for a good draw. It is a shame, because my favorites are all long and thin . With petit coronas and up, you should be OK. Quality is better now than it was five or six years ago. Just remember that there is no reason to smoke a big cigar, unless you have a big chunk of time.
post #55 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
So...... basically in the <$20/stick category, I'm SOL?

you can get some pretty good nicaraguan cigars for <$6, but that would be a matter of taste. I would really suggest hitting a store with a good walk in humidor, and getting 10 different cigars, long, short, thin, fat, dark, light, from differnt parts of the caribian and central america. try them out, start getting a feel for what you like. if you are more or less just starting out, I wouldn't spend 20 a stick on cigars.
post #56 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
you can get some pretty good nicaraguan cigars for <$6, but that would be a matter of taste. I would really suggest hitting a store with a good walk in humidor, and getting 10 different cigars, long, short, thin, fat, dark, light, from differnt parts of the caribian and central america. try them out, start getting a feel for what you like. if you are more or less just starting out, I wouldn't spend 20 a stick on cigars.

Awesome, thanks for the advice. By "starting out" I mean smoking gas station cigars, if you could really call them that. I didn't know at what price point you needed to hit before you started getting good stuff, but i'm sure, like you said, it's personal taste. I'll definitely hit up a walk-in humidor as soon as I can. Now, to find one in Indiana will be the trick LOL.
post #57 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Not to jack the thread or anything . . .

Your question wasn't even vaguely jacking the thread.
post #58 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red View Post
This one's at the top of my list.

http://www.leconnaisseur.jp/shopguide/ginza.html

I've been there once to take a peek inside when they were full-up and my girlfriend complained that she didn't like the cigar smoke. I'll be paying them a visit this weekend.

Lots of bars have a humidor with a small selection, quite commonly Montecristo and Romeo y Julieta. Whether or not they store them well is anybody's guess.

The place in the link looks pretty good. At least, they have all the cigars worth trying. While you`re there, don`t forget to take more exotic car pics and post
post #59 of 9893
nothing's wrong with gas station cigars. My last year of college, I smoked Black & Milds regularly. The only thing I don't like is the smell lasts forever on your body...
post #60 of 9893
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
. I didn't know at what price point you needed to hit before you started getting good stuff, but i'm sure, like you said, it's personal taste. .

I would say $5, but a lot of people would say that is still the crappy side. I honstly wouldn't spend $20 a stick when you have only been smoking gas station cigars - I smoked a lot of $3-4 cigars, about 20 years ago, which I would say probrably translates into a $5-6 cigar today. think of it like those boxes of wine scents that teach you about the flavors of wine, get a feel for what differnt flavors and mouth feel you get from differetn cigars, then spend more money.
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