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Cigars - Page 2

post #16 of 9965
Where's the love for Avo? Avo has some very fine cigars, from the mild to the full strength. Highly recomended. My favorite size is 6 x 50. I like that fatter ring gauge.
post #17 of 9965
Avo signatures are really good. The few Avos I have tried from the domain line have had a really open draw that I did not like, it was like sucking on an empty straw. I like the Avos from whatever the normal line is called.
post #18 of 9965
I'm just starting to learn about cigars, and after a search of all the cigar threads, found this one the most informative.

My question to experienced smokers is: What cigars would you recommend for a novice to get acquainted with the spectrum of strengths and flavors? Equally importantly, which ones would you avoid?
post #19 of 9965
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red View Post
I'm just starting to learn about cigars, and after a search of all the cigar threads, found this one the most informative.

My question to experienced smokers is: What cigars would you recommend for a novice to get acquainted with the spectrum of strengths and flavors? Equally importantly, which ones would you avoid?
Since you live in Japan, you will want to look at Cuban cigars. Something like an El Rey del Mundo or Sancho Panza will be a good place to start.
post #20 of 9965
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Since you live in Japan, you will want to look at Cuban cigars. Something like an El Rey del Mundo or Sancho Panza will be a good place to start.

Fonsecas are also good for a mild-medium Cuban entry level cigar.
post #21 of 9965
no offense to smokers of the following brands, and to those with no access to Cuban cigars, but IMHO Opus X and VSG cigars are crap, and not at all the full bodied cigar i am looking for in a smoke. I met some reps of an up and coming cigar company, ACC a few weeks ago...they have some very interesting blends in the work, using Cuban tobacco with that of non-Cubans. I smoked a maduro that was a blend of tobacco from 5 different countries, it was a full bodied smoke and had that kick that i found lacking in many non-cuban cigars that are usually labelled as on the stronger end of the spectrum. It was much better than the over-hyped, somewhat gimmicky Cohiba Maduro 5 series. Also smoked a cigar rolled from 1960's Cuban tobacco, it was very mellow but that was to be expected with the age on them. They have a very interesting range of products, and should be interesting to see how they take on the luxury market as more people hear about them. For now I think they are only based in Shanghai and are targeting the Chinese/Middle Eastern market, but I think they are soon branching out to Europe and perhaps the US. I suggested they try Japan as there is definitely an audience for this kind of luxury niche. Nantucket I think a good entry cigar is the Montecristo #4. Some say it is too strong for a novice smoker, but it was the very first cigar i smoked and it got me hooked for life. I find it to be medium bodied, and it is the world's best selling cigar so i think it would be a proper introduction. Also it's a quick smoke, you can down one in about 15-20 mins so no worries about time commitment. Most people recommend Fonseca as an entry level smoke, but I think it is a bit too mild...if i was offered one as my first smoke, i don't think i would've been as captivated. For that petit corona size, the Por Larranga petit corona is also a good option, as is the somewhat stronger Bolivar Petit Corona. Romeo Y Julieta is in general a good brand for a novice smoker as many of their offerings are on the mild-medium end of the spectrum. Their most famous is probably the Churchill, but in recent years the Short Churchill (has nothing to do with churchill in terms of ring gauge, it's just the name) has proven to be a good everyday smoke. If you can get your hands on the boxes of 10 from the first launch in 2006 with a darker color, those should be fantastic. If you find you prefer fuller bodied smokes, Bolivar is an excellent and consistent brand. The Royal Corona (robusto), Belicoso Fino (Torpedo), Corona Gigantes are all very good. As is Ramon Allones, whose specially selected (robusto) i think is a benchmark for the size. The Partagas Serie D No. 4 is the world's best selling robusto, and for good reason. It's one hell of a smoke and I don't think I've ever come across a bad one. As you refine your palate and begin to crave longer smokes with more depth and complexity, i think the Cuaba Diademas is a brilliant smoke. Had one on my birthday, was smoking it in a room that was crowded with various cigarette and cigar smokers, and yet it was still very flavorful. The Salomones is a shorter length in the same format, but more powerful. For double coronas, the Punch DC is very good, and not as powerful as the Lusitania or Hoyo so it is worth considering if you want a more mellow smoke and have some time. Punch Punch is also a great smoke. If you can get your hands on one, the Cohiba Sublime EL from a few years back is a classic, i don't think i've ever smoked a cigar with so many dimensions and layers of complexity. Trinidad is a pricier brand, but worth the money more so than Cohibas I think. The Fundadores is more medium bodied and more appropriate for a novice smoker, as are the smaller sizes such as the Reyes and Coloniales. The Robusto Extra is a bit fuller and also quite a thick ring gauge and large cigar, so you may want to ease into that one a bit later. They recently launched an EL cigar, the Ingenios, which was a very rich smoke and should get better with age. Cigars I would avoid: Most Cuban Cohibas. For the price they are commanding, I think there are better options out there and i get the sense it's more of a status symbol than anything these days. That said, I put "most" because the Siglo VI is arguably the best cigar Cuba has to offer today...but it's manufactured in a different place than the rest of Cohiba products, so that may have something to do with it. And of course if you can get your hands on vintage Cohibas from the black lettering era it's always worth a go, the old Lanceros are classics. that's a lot of info and maybe enough for now, so ill stop here. hope this helps.
post #22 of 9965
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Since you live in Japan, you will want to look at Cuban cigars. Something like an El Rey del Mundo or Sancho Panza will be a good place to start.

+1 on El Rey. Also forgot to mention San Luis Rey, the Serie A is another good place to start and a cigar of consistently fine quality.
post #23 of 9965
If you live in the States, some of my favs are Rocky Patel 1990s, Almost anything Padron (esp. the 1926 line), and CAO Brazilias.

If you are looking for some really great bang for your buck smokes, i suggest you go to cigarsinternational.com and search for their Legends line. The story behind them is that they collaborated with well known cigar makers and each cigar maker had to make a cigar 6in x 54ring gauge and retail for under $5 a stick. I love the Pepin, Camacho, and Patel sticks.
post #24 of 9965
CAO Brazilias as well as Italias are both great smokes for the price. If I had no access to Cuban cigars, i'd probably smoke mostly this, as well as Tatuajes.
post #25 of 9965
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fade to Black View Post
CAO Brazilias as well as Italias are both great smokes for the price. If I had no access to Cuban cigars, i'd probably smoke mostly this, as well as Tatuajes.

Italias are awesome as well. I have a few of the new america line as well I haven't tried them and have heard mixed reviews.

Almost anything don pepin touches is gold IMO
post #26 of 9965
Thanks, everybody. Fade to Black, you've really gone above and beyond the call of duty here.

As Matt mentioned, I live in Tokyo, and Cubans are available in abundance. Every cigar mentioned here, with the possible exception of the ELs, is readily available.

Now I have some idea where to start here. I think the Sancho Panza Bellicosos and Bolivar Bellicosos Finos look like they would make an instructive comparison, being the same vitola but different strengths. The Partagas Serie D No 4 and the Punch Punch are two others I want to try. The Monte Cristo No 4 just seems like something along the lines of an old jazz standard; one that nobody doesn't like.
post #27 of 9965
well once you become an experienced smoker, the Monte 4 becomes a crap cigar...ha ha. Even the Monte 2, the benchmark cigar of the brand, i have not smoked a good one in YEARS, literally. And recently they released the Montecristo No. 4 Reserva edition, which comes in a neat black lacquered box and is about $50 a stick. Total waste of money/pure marketing garbage. However, the last time they did the Reserva edition w/ the PSD4's, those were fuckin awesome...i still have 2 boxes lying around and feel they are too precious to smoke. The Millenium edition Montecristo Robusto (comes in white porcelain jar) is a good smoke if you can find one of those babies...my favorite Montecristo nowadays is the Petit Edmundo, this cigar is the equivalent of a petite framed latina bombshell, small but bursting with flavor and character. I smoke this one all the time (the last WAYWT i posted where i was sitting outside IFC w/ the N(N) shirt and holding a cigar, it was this one). Perfect for golf outings due to its compact size, you can pretty much chain em. If you live in Tokyo, i am sure the ELs will be there as they are released worldwide. There is another type of EL, the Regional Limited Edition, where each continent/country gets different, unique cigars. For asia there have been 3 so far: - Punch Super Robusto: Don't waste your time/money. This cigar is the equivalent of smoking air. - Ramon Allones Estupendos: AWESOME cigar. Mild to medium on the palate, it is a very complex and multi layered smoke. Should get better with age. - Por Larranga robusto: I smoked one when it first came out, it is a very sweet tasting cigar with hints of dates/raisins. Too early to tell, but it is a very young, immature smoke and needs a few years of aging IMO.
post #28 of 9965
So what lovely accessories do you cigar smokers own? Anyone use a cigar holder?
post #29 of 9965
no accessories...just a pretty cheap, crap cigar cutter that i don't even know what brand it is, no lighter as i prefer matches. Sometimes if i'm lazy and don't have an access to a cutter i just bite the cap off my cigars, cowboy style. for humidors the only one i have is the Elie Bleu special Che Guevara edition red humidor, i think mine is #16 of 50. I don't keep it at home, i leave it at the store as they help me regulate the humidity and all that. My dad has an elie bleu cigar holder he brings when he goes golfing. other than that, pretty much it.
post #30 of 9965
Remarkably simple tastes, I think, or good restraint--I smoke cigarettes maybe twice or thrice a week, and have spent lots of money on cases, lighters and a filtered holder. I'd like a bamboo and solid gold holder though.
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