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Are french cuffs more comfortable?

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
It may be my imagination, but I find that when typing, etc. at my desk, it is more comfortable to be wearing french cuffs with silk knots (in my case, fairly small french cuffs from Jantzen), as compared with button cuffs. Do you find this to be the case?
post #2 of 35
Most of the time, I don't notice a difference in comfort. I'd have to say, though, that it never occurs to me that I'm wearing barrel cuffs, but every once in awhile my french cuffs will get in the way, which I guess equals less comfort.
post #3 of 35
Quote:
every once in awhile my french cuffs will get in the way, which I guess equals less comfort.
i second that - though it might just be a case of getting used to it. i wear barrel cuffs most of the time so i'm more used to them.
post #4 of 35
Everything French is more confortable...
post #5 of 35
Quote:
Everything French is more confortable...
Which is why they should always be called double cuffs. (good one, ernest) I find double cuffs more enjoyable, not necessarily more comfortable per se.
post #6 of 35
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Quote:
(ernest @ 29 Nov. 2004, 5:28) Everything French is more confortable...
...I find double cuffs more enjoyable, not necessarily more comfortable per se.
Ditto.
post #7 of 35
I never did understand the public's overawed fascination with having an extra two pounds of cloth draped around one's wrists unless it is some sort of succinct isometric exercise. Single Link Cuffs, the proper antecedent to some desperate French designer's early 1900's misguided waste of additional fabric, are not only the more dignified but certainly the more comfortable style of cuff. Worn exclusively by such obviously unknowledgeable gents as Leonard Bernstein and Thomas K. Wolfe, the Single Link Cuff has none of the misengineering of French cuffs which cause them to bind inside all but the most 'sackish' of jacket sleeves. It remains the only correct cuff for a "white tie" shirt. Hence, its inherent right to the title of "Most Formal". It weighs less than half that of the French cuff, hence its physics alone earn the title of "Most Comfortable".
post #8 of 35
Quote:
I never did understand the public's overawed fascination with having an extra two pounds of cloth draped around one's wrists unless it is some sort of succinct isometric exercise. Single Link Cuffs, the proper antecedent to some desperate French designer's early 1900's misguided waste of additional fabric, are not only the more dignified but certainly the more comfortable style of cuff. Worn exclusively by such obviously unknowledgeable gents as Leonard Bernstein and Thomas K. Wolfe, the Single Link Cuff has none of the misengineering of French cuffs which cause them to bind inside all but the most 'sackish' of jacket sleeves. It remains the only correct cuff for a "white tie" shirt. Hence, its inherent right to the title of "Most Formal". It weighs less than half that of the French cuff, hence its physics alone earn the title of "Most Comfortable".
Huh, single link cuffs, what a marvelous idea. Apart from the bespoke route, which company utilizes them? Jon.
post #9 of 35
French cuffs can be turned inside out if dirty. Might this explain how they came into being?
post #10 of 35
I certainly think they are more comfortable. I will not wear a suit without also wearing French cuffs, with the exception of an interview.
post #11 of 35
Not when you're writing at your desk.
post #12 of 35
French cuffs look better. More elegant than button cuffs. In terms of comfort, they do seem to sit more comfortably on the wrist, now that you mention it. However, they're much more trouble to put on (and put away) than button cuffs, which makes them overall less comfortable. I vote for the elegant look of French cuffs even though they're a pain.
post #13 of 35
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I certainly think they are more comfortable. I will not wear a suit without also wearing French cuffs, with the exception of an interview.
The Interview Exception you mention is interesting. Do you mention this because you do not want the french cuffs to be a distraction? Do they make you feel uncomfortable during the interview in some particular way? What is the reason you do not wear them to an interview? I have never used french cuffs on interviews, but up until now I haven't thought against doing so. (haven't interviewed too much lately).
post #14 of 35
Quote:
Single Link Cuffs, the proper antecedent to some desperate French designer's early 1900's misguided waste of additional fabric, are not only the more dignified but certainly the more comfortable style of cuff.
Might I ask what a single link cuff is? A picture would be most welcome. I assume it is the cuff held by a cuff link without the extra fold of a French cuff, normally seen on formal full dress shirts.
post #15 of 35
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I assume it is the cuff held by a cuff link without the extra fold of a French cuff, normally seen on formal full dress shirts.
Bingo.
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