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Fred Perry and Skinheads - Page 4

post #46 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave View Post
I wouldn't be caught dead wandering around looking like that.

What he said.
post #47 of 95
You better identify yourself in certain parts of the country. If you come to New York with that, you may end up catching a bad one.
post #48 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by London View Post
You better identify yourself in certain parts of the country. If you come to New York with that, you may end up catching a bad one.

Without wishing to be controversial about this, to someone like myself, who was around in London (England) in the 1960s, anyone from a later revival is at a significant remove from authenticity. If you add to that the context of a country outside the UK, then the distance of the remove is greater still. This is simply a cultural fact, not an insult to anyone else. It is not necessarily bravado on my part to say I would never feel that I should have to explain myself to anyone in New York, but frankly I ought not to have to - in New York or anywhere else. In the late 1960s the fact that I, as an individual and a skinhead, regularly and with ease mixed with people of other races proved that I wasn't a racist, and that anyone trying to tar the whole "movement" as such was adopting a simplistic view.

Having said that, things can get irksome. In the 1980s I re-adopted the look. I was only in my early 30s, still looked young, and could get away with it. I can recall attending a Caribbean carnival in Liverpool (one of England's cities with a large black population). I went there for the music. So there I was, standing in line to buy a Jamake Pattie for my lunch, and some (white) guy rolls up and challenges me because of the way I looked. Damn it - I even had a red-gold-green badge on my jacket! Still, some folk see what they want to see and disregard the rest...

It's like the Union Jack and the flag of St George - right wing activists commandeered those, but they remain properly national symbols, not racist ones. A black Briton or Englander has as much right to march along with them as any fascist has. More even. The skinhead look remains a fashion, not the uniform of neo-fascism, and the only way to assert that is to wear it in the face of all who make assumptions about it.

(Blimey - I had no idea I could still be that passionate about it in my 60s!)
post #49 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
some folk see what they want to see and disregard the rest...

yes. I aint even white and I'll get the "are you a nazi" question. really wtf?!

How can you be a skinhead and go out worrying about what someone else is going to perceive of your look? There's a reason the slogan "hated and proud" became such a mantra.

I dont even see the WP movement using the skinhead look anymore. They might call themselves skinheads but they look more like bald metal guys or skaters. When I first got into it in 80s you had guys into WP that looked very traditional, wearing smart gear, and it wasnt until you saw a badge on their coat that you knew what kind of politics they were into.
post #50 of 95
I didn't read a ton of this thread, as this topic has been beaten to death.

But like GS said, most folks in the white power movement aren't interested in looking smart.

I went to HS in Arkansas, my freshman year the national KKK rally was held very near my school. The people who came through the area were your typical ignorant looking slovenly folks.
I am sure that not all involved fit in to this category, but seeing multiple news pieces/articles about the rally it was clear these were followers not individuals who'd seek out fashion.
post #51 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
Without wishing to be controversial about this, to someone like myself, who was around in London (England) in the 1960s, anyone from a later revival is at a significant remove from authenticity. If you add to that the context of a country outside the UK, then the distance of the remove is greater still. This is simply a cultural fact, not an insult to anyone else. It is not necessarily bravado on my part to say I would never feel that I should have to explain myself to anyone in New York, but frankly I ought not to have to - in New York or anywhere else. In the late 1960s the fact that I, as an individual and a skinhead, regularly and with ease mixed with people of other races proved that I wasn't a racist, and that anyone trying to tar the whole "movement" as such was adopting a simplistic view.

Having said that, things can get irksome. In the 1980s I re-adopted the look. I was only in my early 30s, still looked young, and could get away with it. I can recall attending a Caribbean carnival in Liverpool (one of England's cities with a large black population). I went there for the music. So there I was, standing in line to buy a Jamake Pattie for my lunch, and some (white) guy rolls up and challenges me because of the way I looked. Damn it - I even had a red-gold-green badge on my jacket! Still, some folk see what they want to see and disregard the rest...

It's like the Union Jack and the flag of St George - right wing activists commandeered those, but they remain properly national symbols, not racist ones. A black Briton or Englander has as much right to march along with them as any fascist has. More even. The skinhead look remains a fashion, not the uniform of neo-fascism, and the only way to assert that is to wear it in the face of all who make assumptions about it.

(Blimey - I had no idea I could still be that passionate about it in my 60s!)

pure brilliance.

I came up in the 80s in Dallas Tx and it was never harder to be a skin than it was then for me. The Hammerskins started here in 88, right at the same time i was getting interested in the scene, and we ALL got lumped in with them at the time. That's one MEAN bunch, and I didn't worry about it then so i'm sure as hell not gonna worry about it now that i'm in my mid 30s.

People will think what they think no matter what you tell them so who cares? they don't like it? I don't care. That's the intangible part of the look people don't understand. You can co-opt the whole deal but if you feel the need to explain yourself to every passer-by then you're missing the one thing that makes it all work.

just one guys opinion.
post #52 of 95
I definitely have to disagree with you. If you have to identify yourself as anything other than just skinhead then that's when the identity gets diluted and misinterpreted. I have never considered myself a SHARP or RASH(Reds are a joke),etc and I NEVER will. I could care less what society thinks of me.
post #53 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHT View Post
I definitely have to disagree with you. If you have to identify yourself as anything other than just skinhead then that's when the identity gets diluted and misinterpreted. I have never considered myself a SHARP or RASH(Reds are a joke),etc and I NEVER will. I could care less what society thinks of me.

I'm trying to work out who you're disagreeing with.
post #54 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHT View Post
I definitely have to disagree with you. If you have to identify yourself as anything other than just skinhead then that's when the identity gets diluted and misinterpreted. I have never considered myself a SHARP or RASH(Reds are a joke),etc and I NEVER will. I could care less what society thinks of me.

this is how real skinheads should think.

M-O-M, he was referring to some guy named Seckboy that posted earlier that you can't just be a skinhead, that you need a label attached
post #55 of 95
Got it, Smart. Thanks
post #56 of 95
yeah for a minute i though the was disagreeing with me but saying the same thing. weirded me out.
post #57 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
I'm trying to work out who you're disagreeing with.

I was disagreeing with what this other guy posted about labeling yourself as a "branch" of skinhead rather than just skinhead.
I prefer the 60's era style skinhead over what came after. I really don't see the reason to completely change the image(i.e. when punk influenced/revived the skinhead sub-culture). Plus the way these "Oi boys" wear their pants(REALLY tight), NO THANKS. My nuts need to breathe :-/. I'm gonna keep it Original
Just curious, I've seen tons of images with Original skinheads but I don't think I've seen pictures of them with scally caps. Why is that? I see nowadays many skinheads wear them.
post #58 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man-of-Mystery View Post
*snip*

It's kind of tragic if you think about it, that people will brand you as ignorant and judgmental, based purely on judgments founded through ignorance.
post #59 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHT View Post
Just curious, I've seen tons of images with Original skinheads but I don't think I've seen pictures of them with scally caps. Why is that? I see nowadays many skinheads wear them.

"Tons of images"? Blimey! Where? I've been scratching round all over the place and not found many.

Scally caps. You might have seen the odd one or two keeping his head warm with one whilst manning a barrow in the market, but they were never a skinhead "thing" (like cricket caps had been for scooter mods a couple of years before). However, for a brief season we did wear dark blue trilbys (with a brim slightly wider than a pork pie hat).
post #60 of 95
i think scally caps are an american-ized accessory. But the first time I remember seeing a skinhead with a flatcap was a photo of Jeff Turner from The Cockney Rejects wearing one, and that's why I went out and got one and proceeded to wear them for like the next 4 or 5 years straight. But i'd say the real culprit is once the Dropkick Murphys got big and suddenly everyone was wearing a scally cap.
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