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Fred Perry and Skinheads - Page 3

post #31 of 95
Some more info here :

http://www.filmnoirbuff.com/article/suedeheads
post #32 of 95
Alex, nice to see you slum it in this part of the woods
post #33 of 95
Growing-up in Australia in the 1980's, skinheads were all the kids of recent English migrants who were trying to be more English than the real English. Their identity was based entirely around this Englishness - some would later morph into racist thugs (see Romper Stomper), but most were more likely to have scones and tea, play cricket and say 'guvnah' a lot. And if they did fight, it was more likely to be with an anemic goth.

I don't recall any Fred Perry's back then - but I wouldn't have known the difference between a Fred and the trendy pink Lacostes that everyone was wearing then.
post #34 of 95
Couldn't help myself, Jason
post #35 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by RyJ Maduro View Post
By skinheads, do you mean neo-nazis?

I was one of the Original skinheads in London in 1968/69 (I have just turned 60!). We were a tail-end offshoot of the mods, mainly working class. There was no overall political ethos at first - I was an anarchist and ANTI-racist. I can remember a West Indian mate of mine who said to me "We minorities have got to stick together" (he meant blacks and skinheads). We all liked West Indian music and Motown.

However, as the skinhead fashion/movement grew, kids came to it from areas of London where there was racial tension and ignorance, and so the idea grew that it "was" a "racist" movement.

When the fashion was revived in Britain, post-punk, in the early 1980s, it was immediately adopted as part of Neo-Nazism. BUT there was also a counter-fascist reaction, known as Red Skins, and SHARP ("SkinHeads against Racial Prejudice").

Just so everyone is clear about that.

M-o-M
post #36 of 95
... oh, and by the way, the original "hard mods" and skinheads in the late 60s did wear tennis shirts. Fred Perry was preferred - I certainly had a couple - but not exclusive.

M-o-M
post #37 of 95
Interesting thread.. something I found.

Quote:
Trojan skinheads (also known as traditional skinheads or trads) are individuals who identify with the original British skinhead subculture of the late 1960s, when ska, rocksteady, reggae and soul music were popular, and there was a heavy emphasis on mod-influenced clothing styles. Named after the record label Trojan Records, these skinheads identify with the subculture's Jamaican rude boy and British working class mod roots.

Because of their appreciation of music played by black people, they tend to be non-racist, unlike the white power skinheads (a faction that developed in the 1970s). Trojan skinheads usually dress in a typical 1960s skinhead style, which includes items such as: button-down Ben Sherman shirts;,Fred Perry polo shirts, braces, fitted suits, cardigan sweaters, sleeveless sweaters, Harrington jackets and Crombie-style overcoats. Hair is generally between a 2 and 4 grade clip-guard (short, but not bald), in contrast to the shorter-haired punk-influenced Oi! skins of the 1980s.

It is important to note that the terms trojan and traditional are used in different ways in different sections of the world. traditional/trojan in some parts is seen as non-racist and in others is used to describe a dress code. In certain circles, you will see skinheads describing themselves as anti-racist and traditional, conflicting descriptions in other areas of the world.

The phrase Spirit of '69 is used by traditional skinheads to commemorate what they identify as the skinhead subculture's heyday in 1969. The phrase was popularized by a group of Scottish skinheads called Glasgow Spy Kids.Its use in the title of a skinhead history book, Spirit of 69: A Skinhead Bible, led skinheads to adopt it around the world. The book was published in the early 1990s by the author George Marshall, a skinhead from Glasgow. In Spirit of '69: A Skinhead Bible, Marshall documents the origins and development of the skinhead subculture, describing elements such as music, dress, and politics in an attempt to refute many popular perceptions about skinheads; the most common being that they are all racists.
post #38 of 95
May I pick up on the term "Spy Kids"?

The term was first used in a tabloid newspaper in about 1969. In fact they had mis-heard some London skins saying, in cockney accents, "Spike 'eads".

I remember having a good laugh about it at the time.

M-o-M
post #39 of 95
personally, I think skinheads should be skinheads without any prefix that tries to define what kind he is. I'm not fond of the ones that use it as a political position, whether they are White Power or SHARP/Red. I see both as equally unnecessary. just my 2 cents
post #40 of 95
Skinhead carries connotations of racism in most places in America. If you dress like a skinhead you will need to identify yourself immediately as anti-racist, SHARP, or whatever, or you'll immediately be branded a bigot. You can't "just be" a skinhead, it doesn't really work like that any more.
post #41 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeckBoy View Post
Skinhead carries connotations of racism in most places in America. If you dress like a skinhead you will need to identify yourself immediately as anti-racist, SHARP, or whatever, or you'll immediately be branded a bigot. You can't "just be" a skinhead, it doesn't really like that any more.

i think most skinheads, even non-racist ones, would disagree with you. it is definitely a tricky issue though. i mean, you're not familiar with the crucified skinhead logo?
post #42 of 95
Suprised no one's posted this thread yet, considering it's right under this one. http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=89027
post #43 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeckBoy View Post
You can't "just be" a skinhead, it doesn't really work like that any more.

oh ok, i guess I was mistaken.
post #44 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeckBoy View Post
Skinhead carries connotations of racism in most places in America. If you dress like a skinhead you will need to identify yourself immediately as anti-racist, SHARP, or whatever, or you'll immediately be branded a bigot. You can't "just be" a skinhead, it doesn't really work like that any more.

Yeah I can. you just have to stop giving a shit what other people think you are. plus, 99% of everyday people wouldn't recognize 'the look' of a real skinhead when they see it. they tend to think big-bald-Oi t-shirt and braces with the jeans rolled to the top of his boots is the skinhead look. I wouldn't be caught dead wandering around looking like that.

here in Dallas, the only skins that append a prefix to the term are racial skins. Hammers and the like.
post #45 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave View Post
99% of everyday people wouldn't recognize 'the look' of a real skinhead when they see it.

^

This
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