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Best Burger Ever! - Page 3

post #31 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by teddieriley View Post

Grand Luxe Cafe has a great "Max Burger." The meat is topped with short rib. Excellent.

The Counter in Santa Monica has a great burger.

Chili's, generally, has a great burger.

Hodad's in San Diego has one of the best burger I've had in a while.

Burger Lounge in La Jolla is great as well.

I agree that for everyday burgers Carls and Chilis do do a pretty good job. The Philly Cheese Steak burger was particularly good. I have to throw in IN n OUT to this, although probably a little better and fresher.

But the Burger Lounge? I was disappointed with that burger. It lacked much flavor to me.

Where is Hodad's, I'll have to give them a try?
post #32 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post
We have very different palates, apparently. Chili's? Carl's Jr? I've also eaten at the Counter, which was fine but completely forgettable. The Father's Office uses a french roll, not brioche. It isn't exactly traditional, but to me it's almost perfect. I make burger's at home quite a bit, and I often use arugula and I also often use blue cheese, which is another non-traditional ingredient that they use. I would never put ketchup on a burger. I only eat ketchup with fries, and usually not even then. I'm not sure if I'm more repulsed by the sight of ketchup on a burger or on a breakfast plate.

The thing I hate most in a burger is if the meat is too thick, thus overwhelming the other ingredients, or moreso if the whole burger is too thick to fit into one's mouth. I don't get the point of that. The pug burger, at Hungry Cat in Hollywood, is another acclaimed local gourmet burger. I ordered it once and found out that it's about 6 inches tall. Why make a burger that you need to eat with a knife and fork? Retarded.

Fair enough. The ketchup thing is debatable since I grew up eating it with a lot of things and probably won't stop doing so any time before I die. But I agree it shouldn't be used on a great burger.

The word that escaped me when describing the FO's burger was pretentious, and certainly not to imply anyone that enjoys it as being the same whatsoever. We just have different ideas of what makes a good burger. I don't like bleu cheese either, so you start throwing everything I don't care for on a burger, then you get a burger I can't recommend.
post #33 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji View Post
London has terrible burgers.

Better than the clear ones in India.
post #34 of 889
I'd like to cast another vote against ketchup. Dijon mustard is the way to go for coniments.
post #35 of 889
I will readily admit I don't have the most refined palette. I put ketchup on burgers (but not the really good ones), almost anything fried, eggs scrambled or omelette, hot dogs, and certain types of chicken.

Does anyone think that Kobe burgers are also over-ated? I tried one and wasn't impressed. More importantly, I don't believe Kobe (or whatever restaurants use that they claim to be Kobe) was meant to be served as a burger - in both the way it is prepared and cooked.
post #36 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I'd like to cast another vote against ketchup. Dijon mustard is the way to go for coniments.

Actually, I'd say mayonnaise is the secret ingredient. Like butter, it makes everything better. I'm having a yellow mustard renaissance lately, so I use it about equally as often as dijon.
post #37 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post
Actually, I'd say mayonnaise is the secret ingredient. Like butter, it makes everything better. I'm having a yellow mustard renaissance lately, so I use it about equally as often as dijon.
I agree about the mayo, but yellow mustard creeps me out.
post #38 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by teddieriley View Post
I will readily admit I don't have the most refined palette. I put ketchup on burgers (but not the really good ones), almost anything fried, eggs scrambled or omelette, hot dogs, and certain types of chicken.

Does anyone think that Kobe burgers are also over-ated? I tried one and wasn't impressed. More importantly, I don't believe Kobe (or whatever restaurants use that they claim to be Kobe) was meant to be served as a burger - in both the way it is prepared and cooked.

Not sure about the American Kobe - I know the Japanese Kobe is extremely well marbled (when raw, almost appears to be like a pink granite) and the fat is evenly displaced. When cooked, the taste is unbelievable. I remember reading somewhere that the fat is "non-trans" and is supposedly "good" cholesteral, unlike normal Angus and the like, which accounts for the steep Kobe price.
That, and the fact the animals are massaged daily, and live a stress free existence.

Ground Kobe is uncommon - the Japanese prefer New York style Striploin as their premium most expensive cut, unlike the west that puts a premium on the filet.

Some say, they enjoy listening to Mozart during their spa ritual.
post #39 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by c3cubed View Post
Not sure about the American Kobe - I know the Japanese Kobe is extremely well marbled (when raw, almost appears to be like a pink granite) and the fat is evenly displaced. When cooked, the taste is unbelievable. I remember reading somewhere that the fat is "non-trans" and is supposedly "good" cholesteral, unlike normal Angus and the like, which accounts for the price.

That, and the fact the animals are massaged daily, and live a stress free existence.
Some say, they enjoy listening to Mozart during the spa ritual.

Isn't there no such thing as American Kobe?

I thought I read somewhere that Kobe was only from that specific region in Japan. Like calling California sparkling white wine Champagne or something.

anyway, I don't really have anything else to add.
post #40 of 889
I don't know if this has been mentioned before, but the best burger I've ever had was at Five Guys in Georgetown, DC. It was huge, beefy, and greasy as heck. But man, when I think about burgers now, that image and taste come into mind.
post #41 of 889
I rarely ever eat burgers, although Max in Sweden generally have above average burgers. A heck of lot better than your average pub burger or Burger King
post #42 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Isn't there no such thing as American Kobe?

I thought I read somewhere that Kobe was only from that specific region in Japan. Like calling California sparkling white wine Champagne or something.

anyway, I don't really have anything else to add.

I believe there is such a thing now as American bred Kobe - yes, from the pairing of Japanese cows brought over from Kobe for that purpose. So the American cows are perhaps in name only, but still bred from the original genetic pool, and adhering to the same hedonistic existence and free-range pastoral principles.
post #43 of 889
No love for fatburger? Double kingburger with bacon and egg.... mmmm.....

Depends on the mood but the aforementioned in n out and apple pan are consistantly good in their simplicity.

The counter is hit or miss if you screw up with a weird combination... but the counter's not to blame for that. Same can be said for Fuddruckers; usually pretty good unless you get too adventurous with the weird combinations.

When I'm inhebriated, the artery clogging goodness of Tommy's hits the spot.

I'm all for high end burgers but I was quite underwhelmed with kobe burgers(actually american wagyu, same difference) at the burger bar in vegas inside mandalay place. Ground kobe defeats the purpose of the fine marbling of kobe since higher fat content can just be ground into leaner but equally flavorful cuts.

I tried the Father's Office burger for the first time last week and thought it was absolutely great (made transcendant paired with Hitachino white on tap and sweet potato fries). The bitter arugula really complemented the sweet carmelized onions. The reason ketchup is a no-no for Sang Yoon (FO owner/chef) is that the sweetness and acidity is already provided by the sweet onion. Ketchup on top of that would make the burger cloyingly oversweet. French roll was awesome as well as the taste of the dry aged beef used in the patty. I think that's the key for a really good flavorful burger. Dry aging really intensifies the "beefiness" so that it can stand up to the stronger flavours of bleu cheese and gruyere.
post #44 of 889
We went to Five Guys today for lunch and I decided to try a bacon cheese dog since I was only moderately hungry. It's just as good if not better than the burgers. Hands down the best hot dog I've ever had.
post #45 of 889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenaimarr View Post
I'm all for high end burgers but I was quite underwhelmed with kobe burgers(actually american wagyu, same difference) at the burger bar in vegas inside mandalay place. Ground kobe defeats the purpose of the fine marbling of kobe since higher fat content can just be ground into leaner but equally flavorful cuts.

Hmmn. I wonder if the American version of Kobe tastes different? Different grass feed? Haven't tried American, but there is a distinct difference of taste in the fat of Japanese Kobe vs regular black Angus.

I hope the Vegas restaurant wasn't cheating either, and just overpricing something regular to unsuspecting patrons. That would be most annoying.
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